UK Tory MP who helped kill Legal Aid is wiped out by defending himself against sexual assault claim

Alan sez, "At least he's got the sense to own up and say he's sorry. Nigel Evans used to be in Parliament. While there he helped cut legal aid. As a result, people who are charged by the government but found innocent can't recover costs. Mr Evans is now looking at a (UKP) 130,000 legal bill (plus VAT) after defending successfully against an allegation of sexual assault.

Of course, were he in the US he'd be in the same or worse shape."

He's been wiped out, and has pledged to try to undo the damage he's done to Legal Aid if he gets reelected. Meanwhile, the real victims of this are poor crime victims, especially women in abusive relationships, who are grappling with a system where only rich people get lawyers. Read the rest

‘X-Men’ director Bryan Singer accused of raping teen boy in 1999; case mentions sex offender Marc Collins-Rector of DEN

Bryan Singer, the director of the forthcoming film “X-Men: Days of Future Past” is accused in a lawsuit filed today in Hawaii federal court of drugging and raping a teenage boy in 1999. The case is a civil case, not a criminal case, and Singer's attorney says the charges are "without merit." AP reports that the lawsuit was filed in Hawaii "because of a state law that temporarily suspends the statute of limitations in sex abuse cases."

Also mentioned in the lawsuit is Marc Collins-Rector, a sexual predator and founder and chairman of Digital Entertainment Network (aka DEN or <EN), an early internet video startup that made headlines for high capitalization and sex parties involving founders and teen boys. Collins-Rector is a registered sex offender who fled to Spain, and was arrested there in 2002. In 2004, Collins-Rector pled guilty to charges he lured minors across state lines for sexual acts. The allegations of sexual abuse involving Collins-Rector and other DEN executives shocked the web startup world in 1999, and led to the collapse of DEN's IPO.

Variety reports on the charges against Brian Singer filed today: Read the rest

Miyazaki beer label

I could (and probably will) write an essay about all the ways in which the Ghibli Museum in Tokyo is amazing and totally different from the usual museum (shortlist: limited capacity managed through waiting lists instead of price-hikes; exhibits that are intended to be handled, even the fragile ones; no cult of personality for founders; emphasis on both wonder and production; modest and beautifully stocked shop; overall non-commercial emphasis; quirkiness that is commensurate with the actual films), but for now, I'll leave you with this: the beautiful Miyazaki-esque beer-labels from the hot-dog and ice-cream stand.

Miyazaki beer label, Ghibli Museum, Tokyo, Japan Read the rest

RiYL podcast 048: 3D Systems CEO Avi Reichental

Recommended if You Like is Boing Boing's weekly podcast of Brian Heater's cafe conversations with musicians, cartoonists, writers, and other creative types.

When 3D Systems CEO Avi Reichental swung by New York to address the Inside 3D Printing conference in Manhattan, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to discuss the technology. The company has been at the forefront of the space since 1986, when co-founder Chuck Hull invented the process of stereolithography, which gave rise to the world of industrial additive manufacturing. The company’s been a player on the business side since then and has also spent the last several years developing a consumer facing arm for the quickly growing world of desktop 3D printing. We covered the viability of consumer technology, the on-going patent wars, and the recent controversies surrounding 3D printed weapons.

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A tumblog of Greatness: Time is a Flat Circus

True Detective + The Family Circus = timeisaflatcircus.tumblr.com

(thanks, @sfslim!) Read the rest

Sword and Laser Podcast 169: Sneaking Peeks and Swapping Sleeves

The Sword and Laser (S&L) is a science fiction and fantasy-themed book club podcast hosted by Veronica Belmont and Tom Merritt. The main goal of the club is to build a strong online community of science fiction / fantasy buffs, and to discuss and enjoy books of both genres. Check out previous episodes here.

From a debate on whether we should read early chapters from George R.R. Martin's Winds of Winter to the usefulness of Asimov's three laws, to our wrap-up of Altered Carbon, this is an episode that should contain a lot of wisdom. Who knows? It might!

Read show notes here.

Sword and Laser is not just a podcast; we’ve also been a book club since 2007! Each month we select a science fiction or fantasy book, discuss it during kick-off and wrap-up episodes of the podcast, and continue that discussion with our listeners over on our Goodreads forums. So come read along with us, and even get a chance to ask your questions to the authors themselves!

Sword and Laser: Subscribe RSS | iTunes | Download this episode Read the rest

Gweek podcast 142: the funniest living American

Your browser doesn't support the HTML audio tag. You can still download the show, though!

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In each episode of Gweek, Dean Putney and I invite a guest to join us in a discussion about recommended media, apps, and gadgets. Our guests this week are:

Ruben Bolling, author of the weekly comic strip Tom the Dancing Bug, which premieres each week on Boing Boing, and pre-premiers for members of his Inner Hive, which you can join by going to tomthedancingbug.com.

Nick Carr is a New York City movie location scout. On his blog, Scouting New York, Nick says he’s been pretty much everywhere, from the highest rooftops to the deepest subway tunnels, from abandoned ruins to zillion-dollar luxury penthouse apartments.

This episode is brought to you by:

NatureBox, makers of delicious, wholesome snacks delivered to your door. Go to NatureBox.com/gweek to get 50% OFF your your first box.

iFixit, the world’s free online repair manual for everything.. Use coupon code GWEEK at checkout and get $(removed) off your order of $(removed) or more. Read the rest

Web developers: EFF needs your help with important pro-democracy tool!

Rainey from the Electronic Frontier Foundation sez, "The Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Sunlight Foundation, and Taskforce.is have teamed up to build a public domain tool that makes it easier for everyday people to contact Congress.

EFF wants to use it so that Internet users can effectively stop Congress from enacting laws that don't make sense for technology and advocate for laws that protect our rights. But once it's done, it will be free software that anybody will be able to use it and improve.

"There's already a functional prototype, but it's not quite finished: we need web developers to donate time to help us finish off creating individual files for each member of Congress.

Please pitch in for a few hours if you can, and help us make the voices of Internet users heard in the halls (or at least the inboxes) of Congress."

Dear Web Developers: EFF Needs Your Help

(Thanks, Rainey!) Read the rest

Renaissance Space Invaders art

Artist Dan Hernandez painted a gorgeous series of frescoes depicting Space Invaders and other vintage game screengrabs as Renaissance and Byzantine art. They're hanging in a show called "Genesis" at the Kim Foster Gallery in NYC. Read the rest

Neanderthalism: handmade art materials from your backyard workshop

Our friends at Machine Project in Los Angeles have a fun workshop coming up on Saturday, May 31. It's called Neanderthalism:

Interested in making inexpensive art supplies using materials you gather in your backyard? Want to learn to heat water or cook in a solar oven that costs less than $10 to make? Like to learn about pigments and dyes native to the area? Then this workshop with artist and Neanderthal enthusiast Katie Herzog is for you!

You will be introduced to the messy joy of making egg tempera paint, drawing charcoal, and dyes from California native plants and kitchen scraps. This four hour workshop will serve as an introduction to a variety of fun and easy techniques you can continue to use at home. You will make and take home a car sunshade solar cooker, egg tempera paint, and a hand-dyed silk scarf. At then end, you will also be provided with a list of related books and resources available at the Los Angeles Public Library for continued education.

We will provide you with a list of kitchen scraps like coffee grounds and onion skins to bring if you would like to make dye from them, and you are welcome to bring colorful dirt or soft rocks to crush up and use as pigment.

Neanderthalism: Handmade Art Materials from your Backyard Workshop Read the rest

This Day in Blogging History: Hidden mural at LA hotel; Our "Missing" Chromosomes; Final Transmetropolitan collection

One year ago today The secret history of a hidden mural at a Los Angeles hotel: During the clearance sale, a puzzling discovery was made: a fifteen-foot mosaic mural commissioned by The Los Angeles Petroleum Club was found behind some old wood paneling.

Five years ago today Our "Missing" Chromosomes: So here's the thing: We have 46 chromosomes. Our nearest great ape relatives have 48. On the surface, it looks like we must have lost two.

Ten years ago today Final Transmet collection available: The final Transmetropolitan collection, "Transmetropolitan: One More Time," is available for pre-order on Amazon. It's the tenth book, collecting issues 55-60: there are nine other books collecting the earlier issues, and as good as those issues were, it's in this, the final volume of the most original and invigorating sf comic I've ever read, that Ellis outdoes himself, pulling together a finale to his five-year serial that's triumphant, sad and brave. Read the rest

Tell Me Something I Don't Know 027: cartoonist and zinemaker Nicole Georges

Tell Me Something I Don’t Know is Boing Boing's podcast featuring artists, writers, filmmakers, and other creative people discussing their work, ideas, and the practical side of how they do what they do.

Nicole Georges is a cartoonist, writer, zinemaker, teacher, aerobics instructor (?), and pet portraitist. When she was a child, Georges’ mother and family told her that her father died when she was a baby. When she was 21, a palm reader told her that her biological dad was still alive. She called conservative talk show host Dr. Laura for some advice. She chronicles what happened next in her graphic memoir, Calling Dr. Laura.

Based in Portland, Georges has been making comics and zines including “Invincible Summer” for over a decade. She also teaches at the Independent Publishing Resource Center, which provides access to tools and resources for creating independently published media and artwork. Georges tells us about teaching Riot Grrl history and zinemaking to teenagers, and finding value and self-empowerment through self-expression. When we talked to Georges, she was in the middle of a 9-month fellowship at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT.

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Follow TMSIDK on Twitter Read the rest

Pulp magazine and pinup auction preview

Will Husley's Lizards from Hell is my favorite item for sale at Heritage's Pin-up, Pulp, & Advertising Art Signature Auction. This Gil Elvgren cheesecake painting (with a current bid of $65,000) is my second favorite, and this Don Davis preliminary paperback cover drawing for Ringworld is the only one I might be able to afford (current bid: $2). Read the rest

Center for Public Integrity smacks down ABC bid to tag along on their Pulitzer

Remember in school, when you had to do group projects, and there was always that one kid who showed up late, only worked on part of the project, half-assed what they did do and then demanded full credit that other people earned? Yeah, that's apparently Nightline. Read the rest

Check your neuroskepticism

I have been increasingly skeptical of the value of brain imaging studies and the scope of what they can actually tell us. This report from the University of Pennsylvania and the Hastings Center is a nice counterpoint that's making me skeptical of my skepticism. Read the rest

Space cherries hit puberty early

It normally takes 8-10 years for a cherry tree grown from a seed to blossom. But some seeds that went to space aboard the ISS are producing trees that flower far, far earlier. One in as little as two years. Nobody knows why, or whether the effect actually has anything to do with the time the seeds spent in orbit. Read the rest

Millennia-old canoe discovered in museum hallway

A canoe found by the shores of Lake Minnetonka in 1934 is not 264 years old, as previously thought, but closer to 1000. It is in remarkably good condition and, until recently, sat in the corner of a hallway at the Western Hennepin County Pioneer Association museum. Read the rest

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