Over 8,400 NASA Apollo moon mission photos just landed online, in high-resolution

Space fans, rejoice: today, just about every image captured by Apollo astronauts on lunar missions is now on the Project Apollo Archive Flickr account. There are some 8,400 photographs in all at a resolution of 1800 dpi, and they're sorted by the roll of film they were on. Read the rest

The greatest Craigslist 'Missed Connection' of all time

If ever there was a 'Missed Connection' that should be a Bogart and Bacall film, this one is it. Read the rest

CC-licensed design resources

Sam writes, "I've been releasing a lot of graphic design resources, turning the plants and animals I see into colour palettes and web or print design textures. (Disclaimer: no animals were harmed in the making of these pixels. I ate some of the plants afterwards. They were tasty.) Read the rest

Think we don't need Banned Books Week anymore? Think again.

Peter from the National Coalition Against Censorship writes, "Some say book banning isn't even a problem anymore, so we should ditch Banned Books Week altogether. That's a terrible idea." Read the rest

Brass cuffs decorated with vintage maps, anatomy, science and math

Kate in Dorchester, England makes gorgeous brass wrist-cuffs decorated with vintage literary, cartographic and scientific imagery: there's Poe's Raven; the periodic table; anatomical dentistry drawings; Newton's laws of motion; the human spine; a map of the Thames and the Tower of London; a tape-measure; the human foot's bones; and headlines from Jack the Ripper's killings and much, much more. Read the rest

A very useful illuminated hand held magnifier for 3 dollars

This handheld magnifying glass has two bright LEDs and is powered by 3 AAA cells (not included). The manufacturer says the magnification is 40X. I think it is less than that, but it is still plenty powerful for my needs - mainly, reading the markings on tiny electrical components and checking the layer fusion on 3D printed parts. I have a few different magnifiers, and this one has quickly become my favorite.

It's not like a regular magnifying glass. It's more like a jeweler's loupe. To use it, you hold it up to your eye and move close to the thing you want to look at.

It comes with a fake leather pouch. At $(removed) + free shipping on Amazon, it's a great value.

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PocketLab: a $100 scientific "Swiss Army knife"

The PocketLab is billed as a "Swiss Army Knife of science." Launched via Kickstarter, the small device contains numerous sensors to measure acceleration, force, angular velocity, magnetic field, pressure, altitude, and temperature and send that data to smartphones or laptops. According to inventor Clifton Roozeboom, it's a tool for students and citizen scientists who can't afford to spend tens of thousands of dollars on lab equipment and will get the data they need from this $100 gadget. From IEEE Spectrum:

“If you are doing a classic experiment in AP physics, you might have, say, a track and a pulley and you want to attach a sensor to a cart to measure acceleration, force, and momentum transfer,” says Roozeboom. “The typical gear available is wired, plugs into a specialized handheld gadget with a host of menus to navigate. The students spend a lot of time understanding how to use the gear instead of learning concepts.” In other traditional physics experiments, Roozeboom says, the device can be attached to a rocket to study projectile motion, stuck to a pendulum to look at harmonic motion, or placed inside a tube to measure changes in pressure with volume.

Video demo: Read the rest

Man fired for farting too much?

Louann Clem of Trenton, New Jersey, is suing her and her husband Rich's former employee, Case Pork Roll Co., claiming that he was fired for farting too much. Both the Clems complained to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), but her case was dismissed so she decided to sue while her husband's EEOC complaint is pending. According to the suit, Rich Clem had gastric bypass surgery that led to “extreme gas and uncontrollable diarrhea.” That was when the owner of the company, Thomas Dolan, began harassing them, she says. Some of Dolan's alleged comments that Louiann Clem references in the lawsuit:

“We have to do something about Rich. This can’t go on.”

“Why is Rich having these side effects?”

“Is Rich following his doctor’s recommendations?”

“We can’t run an office and have visitors with the odor in the office.”

“Tell Rich that we are getting complaints from visitors who have problems with the odors.”

The company's owner claims the Clems weren't fired but rather quit after refusing to take a pay cut when the company fell on hard times.

(MyCentralJersey.com) Read the rest

Boing Boing, a hentai/manga title we have nothing to do with but find amusing

Someone just pointed me to this hentai/manga porn for sale on Amazon, entitled Boing Boing.

Boing Boing is a great name for a creative project!

Boing Boing by Yamatogawa via Amazon.

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This may be the most brilliantly complicated book synopsis ever on Amazon

You know, every once in a while you run into a real gem on Amazon. A self-published work by an “outsider” author who must also function as their own publisher. When you find a gem like that, you drop to your damn knees and thank Jeff Bezos for creating a space where this sort of thing can happen.

It happens in this synopsis of a book published by P. Arden Corbin of Topeka, Kansas.

Here is his own synopsis of his self-published novel, “Unanswered Letters,”

A very young boy writes letters to his parents, who never answer them. Then when this person grows into an adult, he writes letters to his first wife, his second wife, and lastly to his fourth wife, of which she never answers any of those letters. Because this wife never talks to that husband, like a wife is supposed to do. But while all of this is happening, this male person is also taking care of his various positions in his life, trying to earn a living with all of the many things that he does. And while he is doing this, he is also raising a family of six girls and four boys. Not all of them are naturally born to his family. Meaning some of them he has adopted as a single father, even when he was a married man. Trying to keep his sanity while doing all of these things has put a lot of stress and strain on this person.

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NFL team traveled to England with its own toilet paper

Ah, the comforts of home. The New York Jets football team landed in London today with their usual equipment, plus 350 rolls of good ol' 'Murican toilet paper. Apparently the toilet paper in London is too thin for them.

"Some may say that’s a little over the top or whatnot, but it didn’t really cost that much, so why not?” Aaron Degerness, the team's operations manager told the New York Times. “We’re basically trying to replicate everything that we’re doing here over there.”

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Data breaches are winning the privacy wars, so what should privacy advocates do?

My latest Guardian column, "Why is it so hard to convince people to care about privacy," argues that the hard part of the privacy wars (getting people to care about privacy) is behind us, because bad privacy regulation and practices are producing wave after wave of people who really want to protect their privacy. Read the rest

HOWTO: terrifying Deep Dreaming costume

Normally, choosing to dress up for Hallowe'en as a sassy pop-culture meme means you're not going as a terrifying monstrosity from our cultural nightmares -- but with the Deep Dreaming costume, you can be both, with dogs! Read the rest

Free medical marijuana offered to victims of Northern California's Valley Fire

Two medical marijuana product companies are offering free weed to folks impacted by the catastrophic Valley fire. Recipients must present a valid medical marijuana prescription at one of 5 dispensaries in San Francisco, Santa Rosa, Sebastopol or Lake County.

SFist shares:

The giveaway has been going on since Thursday and runs through October 7, and the two companies, Care By Design and AbsoluteXtracts, will be giving out the products via five dispensaries in San Francisco, Santa Rosa, Sebastopol, and Lake County, according to a joint statement.

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Trump's Prosperity Gospel backers say Jesus makes you rich, cures Ebola, resurrects chickens

That weird meeting between presidential candidate Donald Trump and a number of so-called Prosperity Gospel evangelists sounds weirder the more we learn about who was there, and what they actually say they believe. Read the rest

Argentina wants to extend photographic copyright by more than 100 years

It'll go from 20 years from publication to 70 years after the photographer's death, and it's retroactive, meaning that millions of presently public domain photos reproduced online and in books will suddenly become copyright violations with gigantic penalties for all concerned. Read the rest

Rise of the Synthesizer: How an Electronics Whiz Kid Gave the 1980s Its Signature Sound

The recent revival of all things '80s has spurred a newfound appreciation for the decade's signature sound, which was largely produced by the synthesizer. Until the late 1970s, synthesizers had been finicky and difficult instruments to play, but the Prophet-5 in 1978 and the Oberheim OB-Xa two years later changed all that. For example, the pop-synth riffs on Cars hits like "Let's Go" were produced by the Prophet-5, while everyone from Prince ("1999") to Eddie Van Halen ("Jump") ran their fingers across Oberheim keyboards.

To learn more about these instruments, I visited Lance Hill at his Vintage Synthesizer Museum in Oakland, California, and interviewed Dave Smith, who not only gave the world the Prophet-5 but also co-created MIDI, a file protocol that's so durable, it's been in 1.0 since its release in 1982.

Still, advances technology were changing more than just music. South of San Francisco, the Silicon Valley that only a few years before had been dominated by the aerospace industry was suddenly poised to be a proving ground for what would become the personal-computer revolution. Among the region’s watershed moments was the first meeting of the Homebrew Computer Club in March of 1975. Hosted in the garage of a programmer named Gordon French, the meeting was attended by a computer engineer named Steve Wozniak, who, with the marketing and sales support of his friend Steve Jobs, released the first Apple computer in the summer of 1976.

In short, the musical-synthesizer revolution was taking place at the exact same moment as the dawn of the personal computer.

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