Guy Fawkes Day meets Doge

“What doge the Fawkes say?” Read the rest

50 free tickets to visit HQs of Google, Funny or Die, Twitter, and 80 more companies at NewCoLA, 11/9-10

Get inside Google, Twitter, Tastemade and 80+ of LA's most inspirational companies during NewCo Los Angeles. NewCo turns business conferences inside out. Instead of gathering in boring ballrooms, NewCo participants get inside the headquarters of a city’s most inspiring companies. For two days at NewCoLA, you’ll engage in behind-the-scene tours of cutting-edge work environments, learning from the city’s best entrepreneurs and getting a peek into new product developments and innovations.

All company sessions have limited capacity and are already filling up. Sign up and choose your favorites now. Use the code BBoingNewCo50Free for a 100% discount on "Unlimited Passes." Once those passes disappear -- and they will -- get 30% off tickets with the code BBoingNewCo30off. Read the rest

Ben Carson: I faked the names of kids I tried to stab or bash when I was a violent bully

U.S. Presidential candidate Ben Carson sure is one wacky guy. Read the rest

“The Hateful Eight” trailer is out. Quentin Tarantino's 8th film looks pretty great.

The first official trailer for “The Hateful Eight” hit the internets today. The new Quentin Tarantino film stars Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Tim Roth, and Bruce Dern.

“See it in glorious 70mm on Christmas Day.”

Don't mind if I do.

[Facebook]

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This guy's poor dog really hates it when his owner blows raspberries

Nathan Chung's dog really hates it when he “blows raspberries.”  Read the rest

US warplane shot at survivors fleeing Doctors Without Borders hospital bombing, MSF reports

Doctors Without Borders released an internal report today that claims a U.S. warplane shot at people who were trying to escape the international medical aid group's hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, after the building was bombed by American forces. Read the rest

George Barris, creator of the original Batmobile and many other iconic TV cars, has died

Comic Book Resources broke the sad news today that the great car customizer George Barris, who created the Batmobile for the 1966 "Batman" TV series, has passed away.

Barris died early this morning at his home. He was 89 years old. Read the rest

Excerpt from The Biographies of Ordinary People, by Nicole Dieker

Summer 1989

Natalie wore a red-and-white checked dress with strawberry buttons, and she could feel the ends of her hair brush her chin. She held on to Mommy’s purse with one hand as Mommy pushed the stroller and Meredith walked a few steps ahead, in her dress that was blue.

Yesterday Mommy had given them afternoon baths and then asked them to go out on the front porch and sit still while she cut their wet hair. She asked them not to put their feet near the broken part of the step because Daddy hadn’t fixed it yet. Then Mommy put one knee on each side of Natalie to hold her in place as she cut and combed and cut again, and pulled Natalie’s hair straight with her fingers to make sure it was even.

They all had just-alike hair now, all new-school just-alike hair and different colored barrettes that had come from the same package. Natalie’s barrettes were red, and Meredith’s was blue, and Jackie’s was yellow. Mommy had let them toss the old hair in the yard, for the birds. Meredith had not been happy.

Now they were going to school for Orientation. They were close enough that Natalie could see the tent. She had never seen a school with a tent before. When they lived in Portland, she had gone to preschool.

They stopped at the crosswalk and looked up and down the empty street for cars, because Rosemary knew you had to do it every time or one of her girls would forget, when they were older. Read the rest

Best of MAKE, Vol 2: 65 cool DIY projects from the magazine

My favorite part of MAKE has always been the how-to projects, and this second volume of the Best of MAKE contains complete instructions for 65 projects ranging from a sous vide cooker, to a beginners Arduino Robot, to a helium balloon imaging "satellite," to a cigar box guitar (written by yours truly). Most of these projects were published while I was editor-in-chief of MAKE, and it's great to see them available in one low cost volume. The Kindle edition is just $(removed). The first volume of the Best of MAKE is still in print, too. Read the rest

Kid dressed as Darth Vader performs own theme song on cello

Here's video of “7-year-old Suzuki School of Newton cellist Ryan anticipating The Force Awakens,” says Ryan's dad.

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Awesome space photo of a volcano in action: Indonesia's Mount Rinjani, erupting

NOAA just released this awesome NASA image of a volcanic eruption in action. Read the rest

Hypnotic synchronized juggling routine

A round of synchronized applause for Vlad Gapanovich, Maxim Golovchenko, and Evgeniy Pahalovich! I haven't seen a multi-person juggling routine this captivating since The Flying Karamazov Brothers. The video, titled, um, "Drugs," was directed by Taras Pozdnyakov, founder of [Raw Art], a "post-circus" of graduates from the Kiev Circus Academy.

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Moby Dick, or The Card Game

See more photos at Wink Fun.

Confession time: I’ve never read Moby Dick. I’ve meant to. I’ve tried to. I’ve even made significant headway. But I have yet to actually finish the novel. You might say that completing it is my white whale. Ahem. Apologies.

The point remains though, that even though I’ve never read the book, I know the story. I know the characters and I can make (most likely incorrect) references to elements from the book. Which is why, when I came across the Kickstarter campaign for Moby Dick, or The Card Game from King Post, I opted to back the project.

The delivered and currently available-for-purchase game is beautiful. 107 cards, 2 dice, and 40 oil tokens, plus rules make up the core set. The quality put into the components is outstanding – my set has been through numerous play throughs and still looks as clean and pretty as the day I got it. In fact, just in terms of art, this is one of the prettiest games I own.

But, how does the game play? This game will take some time and effort to play. Initial set-up is fairly easy and mainly involves putting a few key cards on the table. From there, crew selections are made. This is a longer process and where experience will come into play. Once the crews have been chosen, cards from The Sea deck are brought into play, putting the assembled crews through events pulled directly from the novel. If a whale card is pulled, the third part of the game, The Hunt, is brought into play. Read the rest

This game about a lazy crow running a seedy hotel is really delightful

In the charming platform game Crowtel, you're a crow running a seedy hotel, and you're not very good at it. Well, really you're just lazy—not living up to your potential, as your crow teachers doubtless used to say—and as a result your not-so-fine establishment is looking pretty crusty indeed when the feline health inspectors show up.

Unless you want to get shut down, it's time to get your crow butt in gear and run through six levels of rapid cleanup, contending with giant balls of garbage, deadly bugs and broken toilets you can fix with your melodious birdsong. Also maybe there are ghosts?

Developed by Sink with a soundtrack by Captain Beard, Crowtel is pay-what-you-what over on Itch.io, so technically you can get it for free if you want. But after you see how delightful it is, chances are you'll wish you'd dropped a few dollars in the jar.

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Groove to the deepest, most beautiful jazz you've probably never heard

Strata-East Records was a pioneering record label founded in 1971 that went deep down the post-bop, spiritual jazz path most famously explored by John Coltrane on his iconic 1964 work "A Love Supreme." Strata-East was a radical label, featuring radical sounds by the likes of Gil Scott-Heron, label founders Charles Tolliver and Stanley Cowell, Clifford Jordan, Pharaoh Sanders, Cecil McBee, Sonny Fortune, Shirley Scott, and other greats.

I'm just beginning to check out the history, edges, and intersections of the jazz genre(s), and I had never heard of Strata-East until I visited San Francisco's legendary Groove Merchant record store several weeks ago. I told proprietor Chris Veltri that I love "A Love Supreme," Alice Coltrane, and Pharaoh Sanders, and asked where I should go next. Without missing a beat, he answered Strata-East. And now I can't get enough. My primers are Andy Thomas's excellent article "A Guide to Strata East," the killer compilation Soul Jazz Loves Strata East (from top-shelf reissue label Soul Jazz), and DJ Gilles Peterson's incredible Strata East Mix, celebrating a Strata-East Live event that took place in London earlier this year. Listen to Peterson's mix below:

(illustration above from Peterson's event poster) Read the rest

The CIA's experiments with psychedelic drugs led to the Grateful Dead

"Earlier this year, the surviving members of the Grateful Dead played sold-out 'Fare Thee Well' concerts in Santa Clara and Chicago to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of their band," says Ben Mark of Collectors Weekly. "But Jerry Garcia and company did not start using the name Grateful Dead until December of 1965. The exact date is surprisingly hard to pin down, as my story for Collectors Weekly reveals, but we do know that the Grateful Dead's sound grew out of its experiences as the house band at the Acid Tests of 1965 and 1966, which were organized (if that's even the right word...) by Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters. And where did Kesey get the idea to conduct experiments on human beings with LSD? In 1959, he was an LSD guinea pig himself in tests conducted by the CIA.

For Garcia, the ability of the Acid Tests to stop the world for a while and then remind you that it was still spinning was one of its key lessons. The Acid Tests, he says in Signpost, were “our first exposure to formlessness. Formlessness and chaos lead to new forms. And new order. Closer to, probably, what the real order is. When you break down the old orders and the old forms and leave them broken and shattered, you suddenly find yourself a new space with new form and new order which are more like the way it is. More like the flow.”

To put Garcia’s formulation in terms a contemporary Silicon Valley venture capitalist might understand, LSD was a disruptive technology, except that instead of upending mere transactions such as hailing a cab or renting a hotel room, the things being disrupted were the basic conventions of society, which is why mainstream America was, and remains, so terrified of the drug.

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Trippy trailer for "Alice Through the Looking Glass"

"Alice Through the Looking Glass" is director James Bobin's sequel to Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland" (2010). Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway, Mia Wasikowska, Helena Bonham Carte, Alan Rickman, Stephen Fry, Michael Sheen, and Timothy Spall are once again down the K hole, I mean the rabbit hole.

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