Everything is not fine

KC Green updated his classic "everything is fine" comic to reflect the manifest fact that everything is not fine. Read the rest

Feast your eyes on Handsome Jack and his new book

If you don't know who Handsome Jack is, let me get you up to speed.  He is perhaps the most famous male model in the world - and has made the time to be a world class magician.  Read the rest

Marc Laidlaw's collected short fiction, for the first time, for $4 (DRM-free!)

Cyberpunk pioneer and games-writing treasure Marc Laidlaw writes, "The latest and for now final addition to my Kindle collection is now live. I've never had a collection; I put this one, 400 Boys and 50 More, together myself. It contains basically all my short stories, novelettes and novellas from the last nearly 40 years (except for the Gorlen series)." Read the rest

NYT's horrifying video of hateful Trump rally attendees

No wonder so many GOP senators and governors are supporting Trump. Just look at how smart and considerate his rally attendees are!

Overheard:

"F--- those dirty beaners."

"F--- political correctness."

"F--- Islam."

"Sieg heil," the Nazi salute.

"F--- that n-----," a man shouted when Trump was taking aim at Obama.

"Get out of here you f--," a man told a protester.

"Hillary is a whore."

"Hillary Clinton needs to get her a-- spanked."

"B----."

"F--- you, Hillary."

"Hang the b----!"

"Kill her!"

[via] Read the rest

"Augs Lives Matter": Black Lives Matter co-opted for a scifi game, but creators claim coincidence

When you've been caught appropriating that hottest of cakes—the name of a contemporary political movement—one has two fair options: either (1) take your work seriously and make a case why it's clever/smart/funny/interesting, or (2) apologize and fuck off. But Andre Vu, the "global executive brand director" of forthcoming sci-fi videogame Deus Ex:Mankind Divided, thinks he has a third way out: to claim it's a coincidence.

A back-and-forth with BioWare designer Manveer Heir led to Vu’s comments and other defenses of the campaign slogan. Vu chalked up widespread interpretations of "Augs Live Matters" as piggybacking on the similarly named social media movement to an out-of-context "hate wagon."

"You are criticizing our integrity and the fact we try to abuse of recent event when it isn’t the case," Vu wrote in response to Heir’s criticism that the ad was "a bad look... These words were thought in our game way before the current events," Vu said. "Unfortunate coincidence for sure."

How on Earth does he expect to be taken seriously?

The game, which tackles issues of segregation in a futuristic dystopia, already raised eyebrows after the company making it put out a bizarre statement reassuring players that 'Deus Ex: Mankind Divided’s portrayal of government-mandated segregation is presented "as neutral as possible,"' as if apartheid itself were a subject upon which neutrality was a reasonable position.

Looking forward to Deus Ex:I Love My Augness, And Yours and the sequel Deus Ex:Oh My God JC It's A Bomb Read the rest

This is the country's largest collection of brains

When the zombie apocalypse breaks out, the Harvard Brain Bank will resemble the scene at a cheap casino buffet's peel-and-eat shrimp table.

Read the rest

Siberian heat wave unleashes deadly 'zombie anthrax' outbreak

At least 90 people have been hospitalized from an anthrax outbreak in Russia, including 50 children. Eight are confirmed as infected with anthrax. Doctors believe at least 6 patients have the more virulent intestinal form of the disease, which killed one boy, age 12. Authorities say it's the first fatal anthrax outbreak in Russia in more than 75 years. Read the rest

Hurray for hose bib extenders

We have a potted lemon tree in out backyard. I water it by filling a watering can from the garden hose. The spigot for the garden hose is against the house, behind a scratchy bush. I didn't want to get scratched by the bush any longer, so I bought this Hose Bib Extender on Amazon for $30, along with a 6 foot hose to attach it to the existing spigot. Now I have an easy-to-access spigot and look how green the lemon tree looks!

Read the rest

Zika hits the US military: 33 service members now have virus, says Pentagon

Pentagon officials told reporters today that at least 33 active-duty American service members, one of whom is a pregnant woman, have Zika. Read the rest

90-year-old fills in $90,000 crossword art, now claims copyright

Last month, a 90-year-old woman visiting an art museum in Nuremberg, Germany was drawn to a 1977 crossword puzzle on display called "Reading-work-piece." Next to the artwork, created by avant-garde artist Arthur Köpcke, was a sign that said, "Insert Words." The visitor took the sign seriously and began filling out the puzzle with a ball point pen.

Police rushed to the scene and questioned the senior citizen, whose name has been released as Hannelore K. She said the museum should have warned visitors not to fill in the puzzle, and the police let her go.

But now the woman is threatening to sue the museum for cleaning up her additions to the art piece. She claims that she now holds the copyright to the "collaborative" artwork, since she enhanced it, but the museum destroyed her creative work by restoring the piece to its original state.

...her lawyer has produced a seven-page rebuttal to the accusation of damaging property.

He says that far from harming the work in question, his client has increased its value by bringing the relatively-unknown Köpcke to the attention of a wider public. Moreover, her "invigorating re-working" of the exhibit further increased its worth.

Indeed, Frau K.'s lawyer claimed that her additions meant that she now held the copyright of the combined artwork—and that, in theory, the private collector might sue the museum for destroying that new collaboration by restoring it to its original state.

The art is said to be valued at around $90,000.

Read the full story at Ars Technica. Read the rest

Only What's Necessary – A whole lot of Peanuts and Schulz stuffed into one volume by Chip Kidd

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Only What's Necessary: Charles M. Schulz and the Art of Peanuts

by Chip Kidd (author) and Geoff Spear (photographer)

Harry N. Abrams

2015, 304 pages, 12 x 9 x 1 inches

$27 Buy a copy on Amazon

Here’s a quick list of everything to be found in Chip Kidd's Only What’s Necessary: Charles M. Schulz and Peanuts:

Intro by Jeff Kinney Foreword by Jean Schulz “Behind the Door” by Karen Johnson (Director of the Schulz Museum in California) Preface by Chip Kidd Brief biography of Sparky Schulz, including pictures of his first published drawing in Ripley’s Believe it or Not Photos & drawings of and from Schulz’s WWII Sketchbook Early cartoons Schulz drew for the Saturday Evening Post Schulz’s first printed comic strips (1947) Li’l Folks strips Peanuts strips Process of drawing Peanuts Rare, unfinished strips Subscriber promotions for newspaper editors Ads for Peanuts coloring books, viewmaster collections, color by numbers kits, candy bars, etc. Pictures of the Peanuts board game Vinyl dolls Covers from the first collections Advertisements featuring Peanuts characters Braille editions Correspondence with Harriet Glickman resulting in the creation of Franklin Unpublished watercolors & other art Intros and backstories for other characters (Spike, Woodstock) "The Last Strip" by Paige Braddock (Creative Director at the Schulz Studio in California)

There is, in other words, a whole lot of stuff packed into this one single volume of ephemera. And it’s a heck of a package. Heavy, glossy pages bring out the differences in color between hand-drawn strips and their pasted-on title cards as well as the fine printing notes scribbled in the margins. Read the rest

Australians asked not to list their religion as Jedi

Spoilsports within the Atheist Foundation of Australia have asked its citizens to stop listing their religion as "Jedi" on census forms because it is making the country seem more religious than it actually is.

"Unfortunately I think the Jedi joke is a bit old," the group's president Kylie Sturgess tells Newsbeat. "I've put it down myself in the past, and now we're calling on people to take the census a bit more seriously."

According to Wikipedia, "The 2006 census recorded 58,053 Jedi [in Australia] In the 2011 census, the numbers listing their faith as Jedi had picked up from the 2006 census to 65,000."

In neighboring New Zealand more people identify as Jedi (1.5%) than Buddhist (1.2%) or Hindu (also 1.2%). Read the rest

love it! -- worst tabloid ever?

What's not to love?

Here a NSFW parody.

[via] Read the rest

Man places boy inside rhino enclosure at zoo

What a cool grandpa! I wonder if he knows that rhinoceroses can run 30mph and weigh over a ton?

From IBI Times:

Dublin Zoo have said they are investigating after pictures emerged over the weekend of a child inside the rhino enclosure. The images shared on social media show a boy standing on the other side of the fence while a man holds his hand.

Read the rest

Lawsuit: Getty Images copyfrauded 47,000 photos from indie press agency Zuma

Photographer, public domain enthusiast, and national treasure Carol M Highsmith is suing Getty Images for $1B because they took the photos she'd donated to the Library of Congress and started asking people who'd used them to pay for them (they even sent Highsmith an invoice!); now it turns out that Highsmith is not alone: independent news agency Zuma is suing Getty for doing the same thing with 47,000 of their images. Read the rest

Colorized 1865 photo of Abraham Lincoln assassination conspirator Lewis Powell

Marina Maral colorized this 1865 photo of Abraham Lincoln assassination conspirator Lewis Powell. I always forget that the world wasn't black and white in the olden days. Read the rest

Tabloid warning: "Children with soulless black eyes terrorize residents foolish enough to let them in"

What’s in celebrity handbags this week? Is it lip gloss and sunglasses? Car keys and chewing gum? We’ll never know, because Us magazine this week deprives us of its weekly feature ‘What’s in my purse?’ which gives “celebrities" aspiring to rise to the D-List the opportunity to fill their tote bags with healthy snacks they’d never usually eat, products they’re paid to promote, and books they’d like to be seen reading. Has Us mag run out of celebrities? Has this window into stars’ private lives become too intrusive? Or could it be because every "celebrity” purse carries the same dull, predictable contents week after week? And why have we seen inside dozens of celebrities’ purses yet never encountered a single one with any condoms, soiled Kleenex, or medication for their bipolar disorder? They can’t have dropped the feature because there’s too much real news, because that’s one thing sorely lacking in this week's celebrity magazines and tabloids.

O.J. Simpson attempted a jail break, scooping out a shallow trench beneath the razor wire surrounding Nevada’s Lovelock Correctional Center, claims the Globe, which says that he was caught red-handed. It’s hard to imagine that one of the most recognizable inmates in the US prison system would try to escape under the eye of 213 prison guards and CCTV into a flat expanse of desert without any accomplices outside to help him flee, yet that’s what the Globe would have us believe. Or maybe he was just walking too close to the fence, and tripped? Read the rest

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