Play Morissey and PETA's new anti-meat mobile game

PETA and Morissey released This Beautiful Creature Must Die, an anti-meat game where the goal is to save animals from slaughter. Play it below. The soundtrack is a chiptune version of, you guessed it, The Smith's "Meat is Murder."

"This game is the biggest social crusade of all, as we safeguard the weak and helpless from violent human aggression," Moz said. "You don't get that from Pokémon Go."

(Rolling Stone)

Read the rest

If adblocking is dead, the future is brandblocking--and less appetizing things, too

Facebook is at war with users who block ads, and battle proceeds apace. Just two days after boasting that it could serve ads that were undetectable by adblockers, Facebook got a rude awakening in the form of updates to AdBlock that detected them just fine. But it isn't giving up, and has already adjusted its code to once again circumvent the blocks.

A source close to Facebook tells me that today, possibly within hours, the company will push an update to its site’s code that will nullify Adblock Plus’ workaround. Apparently it took two days for Adblock Plus to come up with the workaround, and only a fraction of that time for Facebook to disable it.

Update: A source says Facebook is now rolling out the code update that will disable Adblock Plus’ workaround. It should reach all users soon.]

Still, the cat-and-mouse game is sure to rage on.

AdBlock is at a disadvantage due to Facebook's engineering resources and ability to update its site on-the-fly. That said, Facebook loses more money from each lost ad than AdBlock pays to remove it, which creates an asymmetrical fight. AdBlock is, of course, not a noble venture—it dominates the ad blocking market and whitelists ads from publishers that pay it protection money.

Adblockers generally distinguish ads from content by looking at how web pages are structured and where they come from. To those unfamiliar with HTML, web pages are a nest of boxes, each tagged as a <paragraph or a <division or an <articleor what-have-you, with each identified or classified so that other code can decide what it looks like, where it goes, or what content gets pasted into it as the page renders. Read the rest

Luna's prime real-estate and how to seize it

Though 1967's Outer Space Treaty says no country can lay claim to the moon (and thus no person can get a deed to lunar territory), the treaty does allow for commercial and scientific installations on Luna, and there are some very small, very valuable bits of crater rim that could be squatted in this way, to the enormous benefit of whomever gets there first (and the detriment of all others). Read the rest

Audible illusion - this tone seems to rise in pitch forever

BTW: The folks at DeepMiningCorpAssoc sound like assholes.

From YouTube:

The shepard tone is an audio illusion which seems to get forever higher but never really does.

Whoever DeepMiningCorpAssoc is, STOP TRYING TO COPYRIGHT THIS! It doesn't have a single bit of your music in it!

Source of sound graph.

All sounds and images in this video are in the public domain and not copyrighted, feel free to use it!

Shepard tone sound was downloaded from Soundcloud (sound not copyrighted), (Thanks to a guy in the comments.)

From Wikipedia:

A Shepard tone, named after Roger Shepard, is a sound consisting of a superposition of sine waves separated by octaves. When played with the base pitch of the tone moving upward or downward, it is referred to as the Shepard scale. This creates the auditory illusion of a tone that continually ascends or descends in pitch, yet which ultimately seems to get no higher or lower. It has been described as a "sonic barber's pole".

Read the rest

The Tor Project's social contract: we will not backdoor Tor

I first encountered the idea of "social contracts" for software projects in Neal Stephenson's seminal essay In the Beginning Was the Command Line, which endorsed the Debian project on the strength of its social contract: "As far as I know, Debian is the only Linux distribution that has its own constitution." Read the rest

World's greatest seafood display

A person who goes by the moniker usedcatsalesman227 on Reddit took this photo at a Whole Foods in Brooklyn, remarking, "We think the merchandiser hated their job and decided to quit with this stunt as a final send off."

Taken at the Whole Foods in Brooklyn -- We think the merchandiser hated their job and decided to quit with this stunt as a final send off.

Read the rest

Driver caught steering with feet while texting with both hands

A driver on the Schuylkill Expressway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania recorded another driver steering her car with her feet while texting with both hands. Read the rest

Thief unwittingly steals 16 bottles of oil extracted from weasels' anal glands

A New Zealand thief spotted box of chemicals in a parked car. Probably thinking the chemicals were drugs of some kind, the thief smashed the window and took the box. The box contained 16 small bottles of pungent oil extracted from the anal glands of stoats, which was intended for experimental lures.

From NZ Herald:

The thieves could get more than they bargained for: just a few drops of scent glands in their car or home would stink for weeks.

"We popped a gland in our lab a couple of years ago during research.

"We had fans running and windows open in the middle of a Wellington winter, and it still took weeks to go. Some staff chose to work from home for a couple of days."

The oil was so potent it was in the process of being moved off-site for storage.

Read the rest

Cash grants to people with unexpected bills successfully prevents homelessness

In The impact of homelessness prevention programs on homelessness (Scihub mirror), a group of academic and government economists show that giving an average of $1,000 to people in danger of losing their homes due to unexpected bills (for example, emergency medical bills) is a successful strategy for preventing homelessness, which costs society a lot more than $1,000 -- more importantly, these kinds of cash grants do not create a culture of "dependency" that leads to recklessness, nor does it have a merely temporary effect. Read the rest

Eliminate your ancient USB flash drive with drag and drop file sharing

If you’ve ever tried to quickly share a file with someone, you know there’s nothing actually quick about it. Between permissions, log-in credentials, size limitations, and download issues, it’s a miracle if you’re ever able to share the document at all. That’s why we think Droplr Pro is so essential.

Droplr Pro lets you quickly, easily, and safely share files with anyone. It’s as easy as dragging a file to the Droplr icon on your desktop—your file is then automatically loaded to a remote server, and you receive an easy link to share with whoever.

You can view and work on anything, from small files (Word documents) to larger files (videos and images) that are too big for simple email sends. This app saves us tons of time, not to mention it allows for unlimited storage unlike its competitors.

Droplr Pro even got 5 stars on CNET. You can get your license for just $21.99 today, rather than paying the normal $9.99 monthly fee. It's a small investment for a huge productivity boost to your day-to-day. Read the rest

How a digital-only smartphone opens the door to DRM (and how to close the door)

Fast Company's Mark Sullivan asked me to explain what could happen if Apple went through with its rumored plans to ship a phone with no analog sound outputs, only digital ones -- what kind of DRM badness might we expect to emerge? Read the rest

Important man's African-American colleague wins Olympic medal

At the Olympic games in Rio, The Mercury News reports that top U.S. swimmer "Michael Phelps shares historic night with African-American."

The subject of The Mercury News's unspecific racial disinterest is in fact Stanford junior Simone Manuel, who not only has a name and is neither Phelps' sister or wife, but is the gold medal winner in the 100-meter freestyle event.

The Mercury News later apologized for its "insensitve headline." Read the rest

Handy Pokemon Go tips

Here's a good collection of tips for playing Pokemon Go. I didn't know any of them.

[via] Read the rest