#NoDAPL: U.S. orders halt in North Dakota pipeline construction on Native land

Protesters demonstrate against the Energy Transfer Partners’ Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S. September 9, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

The United States government today ordered a temporary halt to construction of a stretch of North Dakota oil pipeline that has been the focus of a sustained and growing occupation protest by Native Americans and environmental activists.

Tepees stand in the Seven Council camp, one of three encampments that have grown on the banks of the Cannon Ball River over the last month. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

Tepees stand in the Seven Council camp, one of three encampments that have grown on the banks of the Cannon Ball River over the last month. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

The Obama Administration's order to pause the pipeline is seen as a big win for the #NoDAPL movement. The Standing Rock Sioux Nation and other indigenous groups have long argued that the sprawling petroleum project irreparably harms their ancestral land and waterways, and threatens the humans and other living beings who live there.



From the New York Times:

The order came after a federal judge’s ruling rejected efforts by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to halt construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, which would run just north of their reservation boundaries.

Moments after the ruling came down, the United States government in an unusual move issued a statement saying it would, for the time being, not allow the pipeline to be built underneath a dammed section of the Missouri River that has become a focal point of the pipeline dispute. The statement, from the Justice and Interior Departments and the Army, urged the pipeline company to pause construction.

“We appreciate the District Court’s opinion on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. However, important issues raised by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other tribal nations and their members regarding the Dakota Access pipeline specifically, and pipeline-related decision-making generally, remain,” the statement said.

Tribal leaders said they were heartened by the government’s move and relieved that, for the time being, the Dakota Access pipeline would not be allowed to cross under their water supply. “When there’s a wrong that keeps continuing to happen, it’s oaky to stand up against that wrong. That’s all we did,” said David Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux. “I’m just so thankful that agencies are starting to listen.”

The ruling by Judge James E. Boasberg in Washington rejected efforts by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to halt construction of the Dakota Access pipeline. A lawyer for the tribe says the ruling will be appealed.



Work on the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation is stopped. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

Work on the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation is stopped. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

A sage tie, which has spiritual significance for Native American Plains tribes, hangs at the Seven Council camp, one of three encampments that have grown on the banks of the Cannon Ball River. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

A sage tie, which has spiritual significance for Native American Plains tribes, hangs at the Seven Council camp, one of three encampments that have grown on the banks of the Cannon Ball River. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

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