Report finds over 125,000 complaints against more than 25,000 Chicago police officers

An analysis of five decades of police records by The Chicago Tribune found that a small group of Chicago police officers have racked up over 100 complaints each over the course of their respective careers, “including notoriously corrupt cops who wound up in prison but also others whose allegations of repeated wrongdoing were never before made public.” Read the rest

Lou Dobbs apologizes for (maybe) doxxing Jessica Leeds, one of Donald Trump's alleged sexual assault victims

On Thursday, Lou Dobbs appears to have doxxed a woman who said Donald Trump sexually assaulted her. The Fox Business Channel anchor tweeted what is believed to have been Jessica Leeds' home address and phone number, and claimed she was linked to the Clinton Foundation. Read the rest

Melania Trump demands People retract part of accuser's sexual assault story--but not that part

Melania Trump is demanding that People Magazine retract a portion of a story that claims her husband sexually assaulted a reporter. Which part of the story? Not the part about sexual assault. Read the rest

North Dakota must drop outrageous charges against journalist Amy Goodman of "Democracy Now"

Amy Goodman, award-winning journalist and host of Democracy Now, has been facing an outrageous arrest warrant in North Dakota for “criminal trespass” since early September. The charges are a result of her merely doing her job as a reporter and covering police violence against oil pipeline protesters in North Dakota. Read the rest

Sassy Trump Responds To People Magazine Allegations

A blistering new “Sassy Trump” lipdub from Peter Serafinowicz. Read the rest

The astounding story of Iceland's constitution - and its government's failure

In 2012, more than two-thirds of Iceland's population ratified the most democratically crafted constitution in world history, written in public and drafted by a representative committee of 1,000 Icelanders; now in a stirring video in the leadup to the next national election, Icelanders are calling on one another to only vote for candidates who'll take action on the constitution the nation voted for. (Thanks, Larry!) Read the rest

Adorable doggo turns 12 and gets a Big Mac to celebrate her birthday

“My dog Pip turned 12 the other day and we gave her a Big Mac to celebrate,” says IMGURian Amandazander1d. Read the rest

The Vlogbrothers break down the differences between Trump and Clinton’s tax plans

In just 10 minutes, John Green takes a deep dive into both candidates’ proposals. Read the rest

Things I miss: Radiskull

Joe Sparks animation makes me smile every time. Read the rest

Bodum pour-over coffee maker with permanent filter

"With the Chemex, even a moron can make good coffee.” Those were the memorable words of inventor and bon vivant Peter Schlumbohm, praising his creation. A Chemex costs $(removed) on Amazon, but you can buy what appears to be a functionally identical semiknockoff from Bodum for half the price. Unlike the Chemex, which requires a paper filter, the Bodum has a permanent stainless steel mesh filter. It's made from borosilicate glass, and is "mouth-blown" as opposed to being blown with another orifice capable of producing pressurized gas. Read the rest

Two turtles, one hat

It’s a classic problem: two turtles, one hat. Well, maybe not classic, but you get the idea. In the just-released and last book of his Hat series, Jon Klassen’s wit shines. Though his previous two Hat stories feature different characters, they both begin with a common problem – a stolen hat. We Found A Hat, however, is all about the moments before the grab.

There is so much brilliance in this book, and to be fully appreciated, it helps to know the series, as the pace and place of each differs subtly but smartly. In I Want My Hat Back, we clod through the forest with a bear, who slowly comes to the realization of who stole his hat at a pace not unlike that of one waking up from a long winter’s rest. In This Is Not My Hat, readers tail an underwater chase that is slow but necessarily suspenseful, with images and ending that, like vision under water, are clear enough, but not quite. We Found A Hat, perhaps fittingly for the last in the series, takes place in the desert. Who better than turtles to force the reader to slow down and savor the moral agony of friendship versus fashion? In this barren landscape, there are sounds in the pictures – the shape of the cacti echoes that of the newly found 10-gallon hat and the rocks echoes the turtles’ shells. The overall design of word and text calls back to each of the previous books. Read the rest

New York Times responds to Donald Trump's lawsuit threat: bring it on

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump boasted of groping women. This opened the gates, and women came forward with claims of Trump groping them. The New York Times reported their allegations. Trump threatened to sue the Times. Times lawyer David E. McCraw responds:

Dear Mr. Kasowitz:

I write in response to your letter of October 12, 2016 to Dean Baquet concerning your client Donald Trump, the Republican nominee for President of the United States. You write concerning our article “Two Women Say Donald Trump Touched Them Inappropriately” and label the article as “libel per se.” You ask that we “remove it from [our] website, and issue a full and immediate retraction and apology.” We decline to do so.

The essence of a libel claim, of course, is the protection of one’s reputation. Mr. Trump has bragged about this non-consensual sexual touching of women. He has bragged about intruding on beauty pageant contestants in their dressing rooms. He acquiesced to a radio host’s request to discuss Mr. Trump’s own daughter as a “piece of ass.” Multiple women not mentioned in our article have publicly come forward to report on Mr. Trump’s unwanted advances. Nothing in our article has had the slights effect on the reputation that Mr. Trump, through his own words and actions, has already created for himself.

But there is a larger and much more important point here. The women quoted in our story spoke out on an issue of national importance – indeed, as an issue that Mr.

Read the rest

Wells Fargo's new CEO previously denied that the bank's sales culture had any problems

Yesterday, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf announced his "early retirement" from the scandal-haunted company, with the CEO seat being filled by former COO Tim Sloan. Read the rest

Mondo Mod - 1967 documentary of Sunset Strip scene

An exploitation documentary that looks at Los Angeles youth culture in the 1960s. Without mobile phones they had to amuse themselves with sex, drugs, music, surfing, and motorcycles.

From the YouTube description:

Greasers, Mods, Beehived Go-Go girls, and pre-Hippie "Mod Generation" run wild in MONDO MOD, a lunatic look at the Hollywood Youth Scene of 1966 that's so hilariously dated it's almost breathtaking! From discotheques to dirt bikes, political protests to pot parties, MONDO MOD takes you to the Neon Neverland of the Sunset Strip, peers into an underground drug den, and even rides with an outlaw motorcycle gang!. Before there was Woodstock there was MONDO MOD, complete with mini-skirts, surfer dudes, narration by L.A. deejay Humble Harve, photography by Laszlo Kovacs (Easy Rider) and Vilmos Zsigmond (Close Encounters Of The Third Kind) and non-hit title tune "It's a Mod Mod World!"

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San Francisco's competitive lightsaber academy opens this week

LudoSport is an international network for "sporting lightsaber combat" and they've just landed their first US location in San Francisco.

Via the SF Chron:

Light saber fighting is really a thing and has been for some time. In the past, light saber classes allowed wanna-be Jedis to learn the basics of saber handling. But thanks to LudoSport, one can now actually sign up for light saber tournaments and compete locally, nationally, and internationally.

Founded in Italy 10 years ago, LudoSport’s light saber academies and tournaments have swept Europe. Really. The whole concept is a bit complicated, although for “Star Wars” fans who wish to compete in international light saber duels, the detailed (and we mean DETAILED) rules, logistics, and philosophy behind the “sport” might be right up their alley.

There are seven forms of lights saber combat and ten rules. Much like karate belt colors, light saber athletes must wear the correct uniform for their level of light saber skill. Players are rated on experience, fighting skills, and technical quality (presumably by someone who fancies himself a present-day Obi-Wan Kenobi.) Points are earned by attending classes and meeting up with fellow light saber athletes in the LudoSport network for actual duels. The results must be deposited online after every battle.

LudoSport takes the whole thing very seriously. This isn’t “Star Wars” camp. LudoSport is making the leap to the United States by opening an academy right here in San Francisco. Classes begin October 15th at Studiomix on Van Ness.

This seems like a fantastic way for GenX parents to connect with their younger children. Read the rest

Looney Tunes Anti-Drug PSAs from the 1970s

Here's Mel Blanc channeling Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Sylvester, and other Looney Tunes characters decrying the use of hard drugs. Read the rest

My 9-year-old daughter is tearing through the Land of Stories series

Yesterday my daughter insisted we go to the bookstore and get the third installment in Chris Colfer's Land of Stories series. These addictive fantasy adventures have her reading rather than asking to watch teen web series about hair styles!

I was thrilled and a little bit shocked when my kid's requested activity on a day off of school was to go to the bookstore. I assumed we were in for another long perusal, punctuated by me repeating the mantra "one fashion magazine AFTER you choose a book!" but she went straight to a clerk, asked for the book she wanted and was pleased as punch to find there was one copy left. She cheerfully brought it over and started to tell me all about it! Amazingly, I'd never heard of this Land of Stories.

Seems twins, Alex and Conner, are swept into the land of fairytales through their recently passed away father's magic journal. Their grandmother turns out to be a fairy-grandmother, and the two go on various quests with familiar fairy tale characters. While fun and fantastic, the content isn't all whimsical as the twins learn to cope with the loss of their Dad in the first book, and rescue their Mom in the second.

The characters must be engaging, as my daughter clearly and animatedly discusses them. She could not wait to read the third book in the series, opening it as we left the store and double checking her backpack for it this morning.

While Colfer may be better known for his fantastic role on Glee, this series is helping teach my daughter to love reading. Read the rest

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