How to discourage removal of political lawn signs: coat with glitter and vaseline

The Nation reports that people who try to steal yard signs for Democratic Congress candidate Jon Ossoff find themselves being covered in a mixture of glitter and vaseline. The sign-takers started to burn the signs instead, so the sign-owners attached American flags to the signs.

Then there’s the women-led Pave It Blue, which is more Yippie than yuppie (though not many are old enough to know what that means). They describe themselves as “ninjas.” They dress up like dinosours and make Ossoff signs that “glitter bomb” (the signs are bordered in Vaseline with clear glitter, so people who attempt to remove them find themselves coated in Vaseline and glitter). It’s a brilliantly defensive move: Sign removal has been a problem in this traditionally red district. And when their Ossoff signs began being set on fire, they started attaching American flags to them, since conservatives believe flag-burning should be illegal.

As one Twitter user commented: "The flag things reminds me of Fumi-e. To keep Christians out of Japan, people disembarking ships would have to step on religious images."

Image: frankieleon Read the rest

Gallery of 34 notes written by pissed-off neighbors

Loud sex. Stolen Amazon packages. Dog crap. Here are 34 angry letters of complaint and warning written by neighbors who've had it up to here.

Read the rest

What happens to a levitating gyroscope in a vacuum?

The Action Lab took a maglev gyroscope and placed it inside a sealed chamber to see what happens to a levitating gyroscope in a vacuum.

A lot of people took issue with the experiment's setup and explanation, but it's interesting nonetheless. He responded to those concerns:

Hi everyone! I see a lot of comments that mention it will stop because of gravity. A lot of people said that in my pendulum video also. But remember that gravity doesn't "slow things down." The only reason we associate gravity with slowing things down is because it pulls things toward the earth and they hit the earth and the friction causes it to stop. So friction is the stopping force, not gravity. But you are right, gravity does play a role here that I didn't mention in the video. That is that it causes precession in the gyroscope. Since it never started out initially straight up, gravity does make the gyroscope tip over eventually. This may be even a larger factor than the magnet friction I talked about.

Will a Levitating Gyroscope Spin Forever in a Vacuum Chamber? (YouTube / The Action Lab) Read the rest

Cute cat-shaped geta sandals from Japan

I can think of at least three feline-loving friends of mine who are going to flip when they see these cute cat-shaped sandals.

With the soles shaped like the silhouette of a cat, the "Nyarageta" is a fun take on traditional Japanese geta sandals. Geta sandals are sort of a cross between clogs and flip-flops and are usually made with wooden soles. This version, however, is made with a softer material called "elastic cell foam sponge EVA."

According to SoraNews24, even the name is playful: “Nya” means meow, "Nara" is the name of the Japanese city where they’re from and, of course, "geta" are the sandals themselves.

One pair costs 3,780 Yen or approximately $33.84.

(SoraNews24) Read the rest

Sean Spicer expected to leave post

Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, first held an off-camera briefing that had one reporter describe him as "just kind of useless", then was ridiculed by colleague and top Trump crony Steve Bannon as getting fatter, thereby explaining his unwillingness to be seen, and is now reported to be "searching for his own replacement." With luck it will be Laura Ingraham.

Read the rest

Elle Australia's new cover shot on an iPhone 7 Plus

Ask any photographer or filmmaker about the lamest question they get the most, and they'll probably say questions about what gear they use. Georges Antoni showed that camera doesn't matter as much as other factors by shooting the June Elle Australia cover on an iPhone 7 Plus: Read the rest

Rare video of a white owl swimming through a canyon

Here's something you don't see every day, a swimming owl.

In late 2016 Derrick Zuk and some pals were hiking through a canyon in Lake Powell (between Utah and Arizona) and discovered this great horned owl as it started swimming in the water. Zuk waded behind the white bird to capture this rare footage.

While it looks rather beautiful, National Geographic reports that this behavior is a "last resort" for the bird:

In an email with National Geographic, Geoff LeBaron, the Christmas bird count director at the National Audubon Society, noted that the owl—which still has some of its nestling feathers—is likely a young great horned owl that has only just begun to explore the world beyond its nest.

"I suspect it actually fell out of the nest," said LeBaron. "In the West especially, great horned [owls] do nest on ledges on cliffs, often in raven or other birds' nests that they take over." He suspects the young owl could have also fallen out of its nest or faltered during an early test flight.

"This bird is young enough that the parents were probably still caring for it, so hopefully once the folks go by, the bird dried off and its parents found it," LeBaron offered.

(TwistedSifter) Read the rest

100 years of bridesmaid dresses

It turns out that back in the 1920s, bridesmaids often wore white to match the bride. Meanwhile, today’s bridal party looks tend to be cohesive but not identical. Read the rest

Nailing Trump on a technicality will not fix America

One subtext of the investigation into President Trump (especially its political dimensions) is the winking suggestion that the Russia stuff is small potatoes and the meat is in getting to prove everything else the man surely got up to: payola and piss tapes, oh my. But be wary of the expansive power of government to entrap, to trick, to effectively "produce new crimes" on their way to nailing a target. If they can do it to Trump, however satisfying and deserved it is, it's only a reminder how often they do it to the weakest and poorest among us. Here's Ken "Popehat" White, at the National Review:

Investigators and prosecutors will tell you that this is a good thing — that their power to convict targets for lying or obstruction helps catch criminals who would otherwise go free because of problems of proof. But people who hold vast power rarely think they ought not. In fact, the most petty and weak human reactions can lead to federal felony convictions during an investigation. To be a federal crime, a false statement to the federal government must be material — that is, meaningful. But federal courts have defined materiality in a way that criminalizes trifles. Under current law, a statement is material if it is the sort of statement that could influence the federal government, whether or not it actually did. Hence, federal agents interrogating people always ask some questions as to which they already have irrefutable proof, hoping that the target will lie and hand the feds an easy conviction.

Read the rest

$28 Chinese app is a browser for insecure webcams

Chinese state media reports on a $28/RMB188 app that browses webcams whose default passwords haven't been changed, allowing subscribers to watch the goings-on in stores, living rooms, bedrooms, children's rooms, and anywhere a CCTV might be installed. Read the rest

Chinese wives, denied legal rights, hire "mistress dispellers" to keep their marriages intact

China's long economic boom and near-total lack of social and legal protections for divorced women has created growth industries in weird services that help women keep their marriages intact after their jerky husbands start treating them like shit and/or start having affairs. Read the rest

Artist proves that basic school supplies work fine for making art

YouTuber Peter Draws accepted a viewer challenge and created two lovely sketches using basic school supplies: a standard No. 2 Pencil, a wide ruled composition book, and a manual pencil sharpener. Read the rest

Just in time for summer: Pizza-flavored ice cream

Little Baby's Ice Cream in Philadelphia is known for their oddly-flavored ice cream (and, their bizarro ads) but they've outdone themselves with their latest icy offering. Since mid-June, the frozen dessert purveyor has been serving up PIZZA ICE CREAM. What makes it pizza-y? Tomato, basil, oregano, salt and garlic. For some people, that just isn't enough pizza pie, so they've taken upon themselves to plop a scoop on top of a hot slice of pizza.

(USAToday)

Previously, the pizza lovers edition: Pizza slice-shaped bags for, well, your slices of pizza Read the rest

The freaky tricks your memory can play on you

If there’s one thing this video from AsapSCIENCE taught me, it’s that I have a terrible memory. Thankfully (or then again, maybe not), it turns out a lot of other people do too. Read the rest

Turn your fast food budget into cheap homemade meals

Josh Greenfield of Brothers Green Eats proves that fast food isn’t necessarily cheaper than cooking for yourself. As he explains:

I’ve had enough of people telling me that eating fast food is easier and cheaper than cooking yourself. The sole purpose of this video is to debunk that idea. I went to McDonald’s, got three meals worth of food, then went to the market and spent the same amount of money and cooked a ton of delicious food. I ended up making enough food for 3-4 days and didn't even use up everything that I bought. Even if you eat off the dollar menu, cooking at home can save you some green.

Read the rest

Big Cable asks FCC to ban states' investigations into lies about broadband speed

The cable industry lobby has petitioned the FCC, asking it to ban states from investigating and taking action on deceptive advertising claims about broadband speed -- seeking an end to actions like last year's New York State Attorney General's investigation into Time-Warner's lies about its broadband offerings. Read the rest

North Korea wakes its citizens with creepy dystopian music

Somewhere between "hard to believe" and "of course they do" lurks the music, played over massive PA systems in Pyongyang, by the North Korean regime. Here are two important points of comparison: the unsettling Lavender Town locale in Pokemon, which matches North Korea's oddly melodic eeriness...

... and Chicago's tornado siren, for sheer nightmare terror quotient. (via)

Read the rest

More posts