Barbie's Ken is now sporting a manbun

Earlier today, Mattel announced its brand new line of Fashionistas Barbie and Ken dolls. These 40 new dolls come in a variety of body sizes (which now includes Ken's "slim," and "broad" figure), as well as a bunch of different skintones, hair colors and hairstyles. The most notable hairstyle, in my opinion, is Ken's MANBUN.

Yep, Barbie's boyfriend (they are dating, right?) is finally sporting last summer's hottest hairstyle.

Don't shoot me, I'm just the messenger.

(The WOW Report) Read the rest

Belle Gunness lured lonely men to her Indiana farm to rob and kill them

Belle Gunness was one of America's most prolific female serial killers, luring lonely men to her Indiana farm with promises of marriage, only to rob and kill them. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll tell the story of The LaPorte Black Widow and learn about some of her unfortunate victims.

We'll also break back into Buckingham Palace and puzzle over a bet with the devil.

Show notes

Please support us on Patreon! Read the rest

Dashcam video shows killing of Philando Castile

Jeronimo Yanez was acquitted Friday after killing Philando Castile last July. Castile, unarmed, had disclosed to Yanez that he was a legal owner of a concealed-carry firearm as he reached for his driver's license, as Yanez had requested. Yanez shot him seven times in front of his wife and child, later claiming that the smell of marijuana, and his inability to see what Castile was reaching for, justified the killing. Viewers watched the aftermath on Facebook Live, broadcast by Castile's distraught wife. The Star-Tribune synchronized and superimposed the two videos — only the dashcam footage is embedded above.

Tyrone Terrill, president of the African-American Leadership Council, said the video could further widen the gap in community-police relations.

"No, no, no," Terrill said minutes after viewing the video. "You don't have to remain calm on this one. You have a right to be outraged. You have a right to be angry. And I would be disappointed if you weren't outraged, if you weren't angry. It raises the question — how will you ever get a guilty verdict?"

He said he tried to point the gun away from the little girl in the back seat. He heard her screaming. "I acknowledged the little girl first because I wanted her to be safe."

Yanez attended a training course that teaches cops to think like "bulletproof warriors", to shoot without a second thought, and that the rush of killing people leads to "the best sex of their lives"

In the class recorded for “Do Not Resist,” Grossman at one point tells his students that the sex they have after they kill another human being will be the best sex of their lives.

Read the rest

Auction: Kelly LeBrock's studded leather jacket from Weird Science

Chips, dips, chains, whips. Kelly LeBrock's custom studded leather jacket she rocked as Lisa in "Weird Science" (1985) is up for auction. Starting bid is $30,000 and it's estimated to go for $50,000. From Profiles in History auctioneers via eBay:

Original black leather bolero-style women’s bomber jacket with short shawl lapel and hook and eye front closure. The entire jacket has been expertly studded with steel points, round stars and spikes with stud-formed symbols including spades with the number 13, crosses and diamond panels. Created by costume designer Marilyn Vance and hundreds of hours of single-studding to realize the designs’ special symbols representing luck and superstition. With draped link chains on the back of the jacket. Interior lined with black satin. Highly visible in the beloved coming of age, Sci-Fi comedy when dream girl brought to life., “Lisa” (LeBrock) teaches the boys, “Gary” and “Wyatt” (Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith) how to be “party animals”. The only one of these jackets produced due to limited time and extreme expense. In production used fine condition. Comes with an LOA from designer Marilyn Vance.

Read the rest

Thinking is a group activity

Most of us vastly overestimate our understanding of how things work. We think we know more than we do. Why? Because we get by with a little help from our friends. (Sorry.) Cognitive scientists Steven Sloman and Philip Fernbach explore why we think we're so smart in a new book titled The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone. Over at Scientific American, Gareth Cook interviews Sloman about how thinking turns out to be more of a community activity.

TELL ME MORE ABOUT THIS IDEA THAT WHAT WE KNOW IS “SOCIAL”?

People fail to distinguish the knowledge that’s in their own heads from knowledge elsewhere (in their bodies, in the world, and—especially—in others’ heads). And we fail because whether or not knowledge is in our heads usually doesn’t matter. What matters is that we have access to the knowledge. In other words, the knowledge we use resides in the community. We participate in a community of knowledge. Thinking isn’t done by individuals; it is done by communities. This is true at macro levels: Fundamental values and beliefs that define our social, political, and spiritual identities are determined by our cultural communities. It is also true at the micro-level: We are natural collaborators, cognitive team-players. We think in tandem with others using our unique ability to share intentionality.

Individuals are rarely well-described as rational processors of information. Rather, we usually just channel our communities.

The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone (Amazon) Read the rest

Be Prepared: EFF's Summer Security Camp

Aaron from EFF writes, "EFF has just launched the Summer Security Camp, a two-week membership drive that challenges people everywhere to gather ‘round the online rights movement and prepare for the privacy and free speech challenges in their paths. Through the 4th of July, everyone who signs up as a Silicon level member and above can receive a set of three different miniature field guides with shareable digital security tips:" Read the rest

Ohio will be eliminated.

This is a problem as I will be flying there shortly to visit my family.

Hoping it's just a software glitch on the Chicago Transit Authority station sign.

(via r/softwaregore) Read the rest

We bought the LEGO Star Wars Rebels 'The Phantom' for the included minifigs

My daughter built The Phantom. I wanted the Chopper and Grand Admiral Thrawn minifigs, (Kanan is ok too.)

She had a great time building the set in an afternoon. The laser canon work and the projectiles sting a little. The minifigs are delightful.

LEGO Star Wars The Phantom 75170 Building Kit (269 Pieces) via Amazon Read the rest

Human toe used in "sourtoe cocktail" stolen from Canadian bar

I don't know what's weirder – the fact that a bar uses an amputated human toe as a cocktail ingredient, or that the toe was stolen. But both happened at a saloon in Canada's Dawson City, Yukon.

The Sourtoe Cocktail Club started in 1973 at Dawson City's Downtown Hotel. To join the club, you need to down 1 oz of hard liquor – preferably Jack Daniels – with a severed toe bobbing in the glass. To earn a membership certificate, you need to make sure the toe touches your lips. But last week the toe was stolen.

"We are furious," said Terry Lee, the hotel's "Toe Captain" in a news release. "Toes are very hard to come by."

And where do these toes come from? The first one – the one that inspired the original Sourtoe Cocktail – was a toe from the prohibition era. To avoid gangrene the toe was chopped off and stored into a mason jar. Some 50 years later the toe was discovered and voila, the Sourtoe was born. Since that toe, however, others have been donated from people who have had to part for whatever reason with one of their digits.

According to CBCNews:

The theft of the toe is a big loss, said hotel manager Geri Coulbourne. She says the toe was donated by a man who had to have it surgically removed, then cured in salt for six months.

"This was our new toe, and it was a really good one. We just started using it this weekend," she said.

Read the rest

A man named Mule owns 3 mules and travels with them across the western US

Documentary Filmmaker John McDonald is making a documentary about a man named Mule. Mule lives outdoors and owns three mules, and can sometimes be seen walking with them through big cities like Los Angeles. Authorities don't know how to deal with him.

John Sears, aka Mule, has been roaming the western United States with his three mules for almost thirty years, trying to find balance between the man-made and the natural world. The 69-year-old and his animals sleep outside, insisting on their right to move as they please. Bemoaning the loss of open space due to the ever increasing urban sprawl and our dependence on the automobile, Mule advocates a simpler way of life in harmony with nature. While many appreciate his nomadic lifestyle and applaud his courage, he's not welcomed everywhere. Confrontations with law enforcement have led to his being fined, arrested, and even institutionalized and his animals being impounded. An intimate look at an intriguing, but controversial character, his unique experiences and adventures, and his urgent message for contemporary American society.

McDonald is seeking funding to complete his film.

In 2012 Mr. Homegrown of Root Simple spotted Mule in the Silverlake district of Los Angeles and took a few photos.

[via Homegrown Evolution]

Read the rest

Short documentary about controversial artist Jeff Koons

After watching this short documentary about sculptor Jeff Koons (narrated by Scarlett Johansson), I have more appreciation for what he does. I used to resent the fact that he has a team of artisans that do much of the actual work, but now I think, "so what?"

Video has nudity.

[via Kottle] Read the rest

A contralto (lowest female part) and countertenor (highest male part) sing a duet

Contralto Juliana Strangelove and countertenor Arthur Vasiliev sing Nick Cave's "Where The Wild Roses Grow."

[via] Read the rest

Why people name things, and themselves, "Zzyzx"

When I was a youngster, during the golden age of prank calls before caller ID, my friend and I found the name Zerba Zzyx at the end of the telephone book. We called Mr. Zzyx and asked if he realized he was the last name in the telephone book. Much to our surprise, he pleasantly told us that yes, he was aware of that fact, and hung up. (It wasn't one of our proudest prank call moments.)

Anyway, I hadn't thought about Mr. Zzyx for many years until I just saw this post on Weird Universe about "Zzyzx Road," just outside of Baker, California. Here's the origin of the road's name:

Entrepreneur Curtis Springer decided he wanted to be the last name in the directory, so when he opened a health spa at a natural springs in the Mojave Desert he called it Zzyzx Springs, so he could promote it as "the last word in health." By 1965 he had convinced the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors to rename the road running to the springs Zzyzx Road. (It used to be Soda Road)...

Several movies have been named after Zzyzx Road, including the record-holder for the lowest-grossing Hollywood movie ever.

Sufficiently curious about any connection between Zzyzx Road and the Zerba Zzyx who I telephonically encountered in the 1970s, I did a Google search found this 1981 article from the Associated Press:

(Cincinnati) Roger Obermeyer wanted a way to make his name noticed in the city telephone book, so the advertising executive has himself listed as Zerba Zzyx, the last name in the directory. Read the rest

Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" as a spaghetti western theme

The Samurai Guitarist brings some Morricone to Michael.

(via Laughing Squid)

Read the rest

Wolf chases goat across sheer cliff

In this video, a hungry wolf chases a small goat across the face of a sheer, crumbling cliff. The wolf wins. Read the rest

US-Mexican beer mocks Trump with frowning Mariachi label

Amigous Cerveza is a craft beer that sports a glum Mariachi Trump sporting a swastika belt buckle, a sombrero that says "Luck You" on the brim, and a misspelled "Amigos." The back of the label declares that the orange guy belongs "in a mad house, not the White House."

The beer was created by the cross-border team Epic Brewing in the US and Mexico's Casa Cervecera Cru Cru brewery. "We don't agree on how the president of the United States talks about Mexico. We wanted to show him that we can create great products collaborating between The United States and Mexico," says Cru Cru's CEO Luis Enrique de la Reguera.

Launched in May, the first batch – 1,200 bottles and 400 liters on tap – sold out in one week. I don't think Trump's wall will be able to keep this beer away.

Read the rest

Look how fast these tiny Japanese sumo robots move

These little remote control vehicles are designed to push each other out of a small circle. They dart so fast that it's hard to keep up.

[via] Read the rest

More posts