These trippy videos are designed to entice you to purchase eyewear

Belgian fashion designer Walter Van Beirendonck has paired up with the Russian eyewear company FakbyFak to create fashion videos for the release of his new eyewear line “Toy Glasses.” The three videos are named Brutal Love, Total Liquidity, and Self Destruction. Out Magazine explains that the films are “a demonstration of what would likely happen to our Sims if they were left to their own devices in an artsy sex dungeon with a bunch of acid...Beirendonck's videos employ the talents of performance artists Maria Forque, Salvia and Liza Keane, and are styled in 3D animations created by visual artists Claudia Maté, Ines Alpha and Jennifer Mehigan. They're influenced by a combination of '70s punk subcultures, Alice In Wonderland and bizarre makeup techniques”.

Wonderfully strange and psychedelic, Beirendonck’s films warp the viewer's reality and urge them to question the nature of their own perception. From Out:

These 3D spaces speak to Walter Van Beirendonck’s interest in utopias—the need to dream in order to not only escape reality but to challenge it. In doing so they ask us to break free from the mind-forged chains of convention we weigh ourselves down with day to day.

Beirendonck’s conceptual ideas behind the film make me think of Timothy Leary’s philosophy that helped define '70a counterculture; to break away from the rigid conformity that plagues so much of society and to think for oneself.

NSFW?

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Coffee makes you live longer? Don't believe the buzz

Two new studies from the Annals of Internal Medicine have made the rounds on news sites, each claiming that an increased coffee consumption leads to a higher life expectancy. While this may sound like a great excuse to fuel a coffee habit, the summary of the studies explicitly states that:

Although drinking coffee cannot be recommended as being good for your health on the basis of these kinds of studies, the studies do suggest that for many people, no long-term harm will result from drinking coffee.

Despite the claims from many news sources, excessive coffee drinking has not been proven to prolong your life. For those wondering why the study in inconclusive, an opinion piece in Forbes clearly outlines why association does not prove causation, and why more coffee will not necessarily benefit you.

A compelling article from last year in New York Times' Well explains a fairly decisive link between genetics and the health impact of coffee-drinking. Whether or not you are a fast- or slow-metabolizer of caffeine may determine its health benefits or consequences. If you are interested in the subject, it is worth reading.

While the two new studies do suggest that coffee drinkers live longer lives, there is no evidence that clearly points to coffee as the culprit. For now, drink assured that coffee will not harm you, but know that it may not be the elixir that it’s currently hyped up to be.

Image: Peter Lindberg Read the rest

RIP: George Romero creator of "Night of the Living Dead"

George Romero was 27 when he made the zombie movie Night of the Living Dead on a $114,000 budget. He went on to make over 20 movies, many with a horror or zombie apocalypse theme. He died today at age 77 from lung cancer.

From the LA Times:

In recent years, as the zombie genre had a resurgence, Romero wasn’t always a fan. He told a British newspaper in 2013 that he’d been asked to do some episodes of “The Walking Dead,” but had no interest.

“Basically it’s just a soap opera with a zombie occasionally,” he told the Big Issue. “I always used the zombie as a character for satire or a political criticism, and I find that missing in what’s happening now.”

Romero took an intellectual view to his depiction of zombies, an approach he found lacking in some of the work that came after him.

“I grew up on these slow-moving-but-you-can’t-stop-them [creatures], where you’ve got to find the Achilles’ heel, or in this case, the Achilles’ brain,” Romero told The Times in 2005, referring to the organ whose destruction waylays a zombie. “In [the remake] they’re just dervishes, you don’t recognize any of them, there’s nothing to characterize them.... [But] I like to give even incidental zombies a bit of identification.

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Five great crime novels

Every week, Kevin Kelly, Claudia Dawson, and I send out our Recomendo newsletter. It's a lightweight rundown of six useful things. (Sign up here!) Here's this week's newsletter:

Five good crime books: On the excellent Five Books website Author Simon Brett is interviewed about his five favorite crime novels. Three of his picks (A Kiss Before DyingThe Big Sleep, and The Talented Mr. Ripley) are among my favorites, so I added his other two picks to my wish list. — MF

Summer enjoyment: I spent almost four hours lounging in this papasan float on the 4th of July and it’s now my favorite purchase of the year. Half my body stays in the water, so I’m able to stay cool while basking in the sun. The only drawback might be how easy it is to relax — time went by so fast, I got sunburned. — CD

Outstanding listen: You know about Song Exploder, yes? It’s this amazing podcast that takes one well-known song each week and explodes it into its component parts. The musicians who wrote and perform the song take it apart track by track, sometimes beat by beat, explaining what they were thinking as they created the pieces: what challenges and dead-end they met along the way, how the song changed as they worked on it, and why they like the final version. It’s the x-ray into music I always wanted. — KK

Free app finder: Daily App Advice shows you which paid apps are currently being given away for free in the iTunes App Store. Read the rest

Take this visual compatibility quiz to find out what kind of person you are

Do you have a neat signature, or a messy one? Do you let the dishes pile up in the sink, or do you clean them as soon as you are done using them? Do you prefer coffee or tea? The purpose of 2 Kinds of People, by João Rocha is to sit down with another person and go through the dozens of side-by-side drawings to find out how compatible you are. It isn't supposed to be a serious exercise, but you will probably learn some interesting things about yourself and your friends and partners by doing it. For instance, not only did I learn that Carla likes to hang her toilet paper with the hanging side towards the wall, she was also able to convince me that her preferred way is superior.

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Proposed Massachusetts law would let cops steal your car if it had a "hidden compartment"

Hey, remember how Bill Clinton doubled down on the War on Drugs, perfecting Reagan's haphazard and shoddily made race-war into a well-oiled incarceration machine that turned America into the world's greatest incarcerator, a nation that imprisoned black people at a rate that exceeded Apartheid-era South Africa? Read the rest

Disney will pivot Epcot away from its "sponsored content" model

Epcot Center (now "Epcot") is a weird stepchild among Disney themeparks; it started as a kind of ghastly parody of Walt Disney's plan to build a totally controlled domed company town on the enormous tract of central Florida land that is Walt Disney World, and became a cash-cow-oriented park whose radical break with themepark design norms was a blessing and a curse. Read the rest

Shade the Changing Girl v. 1: On sidequels and writing the teenage alien.

This week (and next due to the nature of different release dates for the direct market and the book market) marks the release of the first collection of SHADE THE CHANGING GIRL v.1: Earth Girl Made Easy, which compiles issues 1-6 (previously). It’s a heavy load to recreate a character that giants before you have written. Steve Ditko is a master of the strange. His mind a merry-go-round of experimentation.

Free on the Internet Archive: 255 issues of Galaxy Magazines, 1950-1976

Galaxy was one of the first pulps to explicitly bill itself as a magazine for "adults," in 1950 under founding editor HL Gold. Read the rest

Here's an interactive way to learn ethical hacking

The Metasploit framework is an open source tool that lets you simulate real attacks against your system. You can get introduced to this essential cyber security software with this Penetration Testing & Ethical Hacking course, available now in the Boing Boing Store.

Throughout these 23 lessons, you’ll exploit vulnerabilities, evade antivirus software, and gain unauthorized access to protected systems. After getting familiar with the Metasploit environment, you’ll analyze targets for system weaknesses and execute automated tests backed by the world’s largest database of exploits. You will learn how to escalate privileges and take over remote machines by executing your own penetration code, and discover how to effectively cover your digital tracks. It’s a great way to pick up the fundamentals of this critical security role, since you’ll be following along closely with their interactive lessons.

This Hands on, Interactive Penetration Testing & Ethical Hacking course is usually $65, but you can pick it up here for $28. Read the rest