Artwork that challenges you to weave in between pendulums

The artist and William Forsythe has mounted a mesmerizing installation in Paris called "Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time No. 2" -- in which he fills a huge room with swinging pendulums, and viewers are supposed to walk among them without running into any.

Quite a challenge, as the video shows! As a writeup at Colossal notes:

“The spectators are free to attempt a navigation of this statistically unpredictable environment, but are requested to avoid coming in contact with any of the swinging pendulums,” says an artist statement regarding Forsythe’s choreographic object. “This task, which automatically intimates and alerts the spectators innate predictive faculties, produces a lively choreography of manifold and intricate avoidance strategies.”

Me, I'd love to see a video of precisely how the gallery-workers set those pendulums in motion every day. Read the rest

Opera browser now includes cryptojacking protection

"Cryptojacking" is the latest trend in malware; by some estimates, there are at least 2,500 sites that illicitly run Javascript in your browser to secretly mine cryptocurrency.

So the browser pushback has begun. Opera just announced its latest release includes anti-mining measures:

Bitcoins are really hot right now, but did you know that they might actually be making your computer hotter? Your CPU suddenly working at 100 percent capacity, the fan is going crazy for seemingly no reason and your battery quickly depleting might all be signs that someone is using your computer to mine for cryptocurrency.

Brave, Brendan Eich's new startup browser, also implemented this type of blocking earlier this year. I hope this trend continues; there are lots of plugins that block cryptocurrency mining, but it'll only become mainstream if it's built as a default into mainstream browsers. Read the rest

Some of 2017's most beautiful and striking objects

Rain Nos roundup of the Core 77's Favorite Objects from 2017 has some real beauts that are of note to aficionados of physical culture and made objects. Read the rest

The Polak Game: an exercise to help reveal your theories of the future

Dutch sociologist and Holocaust survivor Frederik Lodewijk Polak's massive future studies text The Image of the Future makes a bold statement about optimism and pessimism, creating four categories of belief about the future, divided on two axes: things are improving/worsening; and people can/can't do something about the future. Read the rest

"The efficiency gap": understanding the math behind a crucial Supreme Court gerrymandering case

Last October, the Supreme Court heard argument in Gill v. Whitford, a Wisconsin gerrymandering case that has far-reaching implications for the November midterms in 2018; the court is expected to rule next June. Read the rest

This short film gives a sense of how terrifying sleep paralysis can be

Paralys reenacts the moment a young woman falls asleep while watching a game show, only to experience sleep paralysis. Read the rest

Exhilarating highlights from a year of pro snowboarding

Heart-pounding snowboard footage set to the original version of "Major Tom"? Yes please! Read the rest

Mesmerizing videos of recreated astronomical events

Inspired by Kubrick and Nolan, designer Thomas Vanz set out to create cool effects depicting massive phenomena from our universe: Read the rest

Liartown: the First Four Years, a tour-de-force of killer shooping and acerbic wit

Sean Tejaratchi's amazing Liartown, USA (previously) is a bottomless well of astoundingly good photoshops from a parallel universe of bitter, ha-ha-only-serious sight gags, minutely detailed, lovingly crafted and often NSFW; Tejaratchi's new 248-page color, 8.5"x11" anthology, LiarTown: The First Four Years 2013-2017 is a powerful dose of creepypasta in its purest form.