The Nostalgia Nerd’s Retro Tech: Computers, Consoles and Games

Peter Leigh, known as the Nostalgia Nerd on his YouTube channel, has a cool new hardcover book out called The Nostalgia Nerd’s Retro Tech: Computers, Consoles and Games, which is exactly what it says it is - photos and descriptions of gear from the 1970s-1990s. Here are a few spreads from the book to give you an idea of what's in it and how the material is presented:

Read the rest

This is what 'going viral' looks like

Sometimes I blog about something and it goes nowhere, much like this girl's domino:

Sometimes I blog about something and it continues to weave its way to the many corners of the internet, much like this:

But, sometimes I blog about something and it starts a chain reaction that looks more like this (I looked for a domino video that featured fireworks and confetti but came up short):

via

In other words, it goes viral. Now, on November 11, I blogged about Tim Klein's "puzzle montages" and I believe it's the most-viral post I've written in my over-seven-year professional blogging career. While I don't have the exact numbers, I have been watching it quickly spread across the planet and I feel certain that it is. Today, I thought it would be fun to pull back the curtain a little to show you what "going viral" looks like from "backstage."

[TL;DR version (and, warning, this post IS entirely TOO LONG): The post I wrote about Tim Klein's puzzle montages went nuts! Media outlets from around the globe picked up the story (digital, print, TV), some linked back to Boing Boing, some didn't. Tim got TONS of fan mail, all of his art sold, and now he's being offered gallery shows. Well... he and I talked and we plan to take it to the next level together (note: we didn't know each other before all of this). We first want to build a community of people who love puzzle mashups. Want to learn more? Read the rest

Man in hang glider fails to strap in properly, hangs by his hands for dear life

This unlucky guy tried hang gliding in Switzerland. His instructor failed to attach him to the glider. Watch this video and prepare to wet your pants. Read the rest

Literal breadboarding, with toast and Vegemite

Vegemite has enough salt to be conductive, and is viscous enough to draw distinct traces with on suitable medium (say, toast that has been cooked such that most of the water has evaporated, making it a good insulator), as Luke Weston has ably demonstrated. Read the rest

Watch this comedian's hilarious step-by-step 'Tainted Love' dance tutorial

When you've got moves like comedian Joe Kwaczala, it's best not to keep them to yourself. He says, "Yes, this is going to be the official dance from the music video." No, it's not. Watch it anyway.

Thanks, Jenny! Read the rest

Eat the Teacup, It’s Delicious

The Japanese are extremely proud of their pottery, which is among the finest in the world. And with the special place the Tea Ceremony holds in Japanese culture, tea cups are finely wrought. Many of them look more like not-so-chunky mugs than the European teacups we see. Those known as Karatsu Ware are among the most highly regarded.

While they look like teacups, these “karatsu-yaki” are actually edible rice cakes. They are made by master confectioner Osamu Tsurumaru in the city of Karatsu, Saga Prefecture, Japan and are sold at Nakazato Tarouemon Tobo, a 400-year old pottery studio.

The price is a shockingly low $2.60 per cup, all of which are painted by Tsurumaru himself in traditional designs. He also makes rice-cake saucers, which perhaps look more realistic than the teacups! A set of one cup and saucer will set you back 12 bucks, but imagine serving it to guests for desert.

Via Asahi Shimbum/Photos by Mahito Kaai. Read the rest

Nobody is happy in the first trailer for Avengers: Endgame

Having 50% of the universe's population turned into ash by a lunatic seems to have brought everyone in the Marvel Cinematic Universe down. That said, after the emotional thrashing that Marvel fans took from watching Avengers: Infinity War, anything will likely feel light and airy. Read the rest

Moose unwittingly plays ding dong ditch with his butt

A moose accidentally rang a doorbell with his behind while bumbling around the outside of an Anchorage, Alaska home.

On Thursday, Kyle Stultz and his partner Allie Johnstone heard the doorbell ring at 1:30 AM. They thought it was a prankster until they saw the security cam footage. That's when they learned it was a moose whose backside had hilariously set off the bell. The video is everything.

KTVA reports:

After checking on their dogs and looking out the door to find nothing, Stultz assumed some neighborhood kids were playing a prank.

"We were thinking kids coming through playing ding dong ditch or maybe a neighbor coming through. We had no idea," Stultz said.

So they checked their security system and were surprised to see a moose caboose.

"We had this nice moose behind waiting for us right here," Stultz said. "And he decided to back up right into it and that’s how he got our doorbell."

(Jezebel) Read the rest

Fry Roulette is a new game to eat fried foods with friends

Ground House, a hip burger joint in Irvine, CA, has just gamified eating fried foods with their Fry Roulette. There's a spinning wheel, six types of deep-fried potato products, and 12 different dipping centers.

Buzzfeed shows how it works: Fry Roulette Exists And We Know You Want To Play

screenshot via Ground House IG Read the rest

$30 plug-and-play kit converts a Bird scooter into a "personal scooter"

When scooter companies like Bird started illegally deploying their gadgets in city streets, there was intense interest in both the street value of the components to be found within each of these VC-backed ewaste-in-waiting devices, and tactics for hotwiring them. Read the rest

An annual Christmas craft tradition: the Die Hard Air Duct ornament

Combine a paperclip, tin foil, a cereal box, and a print out to make the Die Hard John McClane Air Duct Christmas Ornament. PS: Die Hard is a Christmas movie. (via Kottke) Read the rest

Top FTC official is so such a corporate shill that he has conflicts of interest for 100 companies, including Equifax and Facebook

Andrew Smith is Trump's chief of the FTC Consumer Protection Bureau, in charge of investigating companies that abuse Americans -- but he can't, because he has previously provided services for over 100 of America's largest companies, including Facebook, a whack of payday lenders, Amazon, American Airlines, Amex, BoA, Capital One, Citigroup, John Deere, Equifax, Expedia, Experian, Glaxosmithkline, Goldman Sachs, Jpmorgan, Linkedin, Microsoft, Paypal, Redbubble, Twitter, Sotheby's, Transunion, Uber, Verizon, Visa, Disney and Wells Fargo. Read the rest

Ha-ha, only serious: McSweeney's on price-gouging in the emergency room

Emergency rooms at for-profit hospitals are notorious price-gougers, where an ice-pack and a bandage can cost $5,000, and where no one will tell you how much your care is costing until months after the fact. Read the rest

Here's a new, smarter way to learn a new language

At the rate the world is shrinking, you don't need to be a globetrotter for a second language to be a useful skill. And if you're looking to learn that second language (or a third, or fourth), uTalk Language Education is the learning program that makes progression not only easy but fun.

If you can't be among native speakers, there's not much of an immediate reward to rote memorization of words and phrases. That's why uTalk "gamifies" the process by folding the learning process into fun challenges and exercises. You can "level up" your fluency as you go along, getting verification on your pronunciation from native voice artists. Before long, you'll be picking up full sentences you can use in real-world conversations.

What's more, uTalk offers this learning structure for more than 130 languages, loads more than most other language apps. You can choose up to six with a lifetime subscription to uTalk Language Education for $24.99 - a drop from the previous sale price of $29.99. Read the rest

Pantone chose this 'life-affirming' shade as 2019's Color of the Year

In 2019, we'll move out of Ultra Violet and into Living Coral, according to the Pantone Color Institute. Their color experts have determined that their Color of the Year will be the "vibrant, yet mellow" PANTONE 16-1546.

Here's what they have to say about this "life-affirming" shade:

In reaction to the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life, we are seeking authentic and immersive experiences that enable connection and intimacy. Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral welcomes and encourages lighthearted activity. Symbolizing our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.

Representing the fusion of modern life, PANTONE Living Coral is a nurturing color that appears in our natural surroundings and at the same time, displays a lively presence within social media.

How do they come to pick their Color of Year? Well, they write that "the selection process requires thoughtful consideration and trend analysis" and that their color experts "comb the world looking for new color influences."

Don't get me wrong, it's a lovely color, but the cynic in me is screaming, "But climate change is bleaching the coral reefs!"

(After I wrote this up, I found this searing Slate article that agrees with me, "Pantone might as well have named it 'The Rare Coral That Has Not Yet Been Bleached, as It Inevitably Someday Will in This Increasingly Toxic Toilet Bowl We Call Earth.'")

images via Pantone

(It's Nice That) Read the rest