Grow your skills before the year ends with these eBook collections

Need a boost on that resume? Get a valuable tech education on your own time with these eBook bundles. They contain guides from Packt Publishing that cover everything from game development to machine learning.

The Complete Mobile App Developer eBook Bundle

It's a veritable gold rush in the App Store these days. Get in on it and develop your own killer app using Xamarin, JQuery and other platforms. This 10-book master class covers the entire development process from scripting to marketing.

MSRP: $223.90

Sale Price: $19.99 (91% off)

The Machine Learning Mastery eBook Bundle

This bundle simplifies the complex algorithms you need to kick off the process of machine learning, the technology powering voice recognition, self-driving cars, and more cutting-edge innovations. The eBooks here include broad overviews of the core concepts plus dedicated courses on Python and other essential tools.

MSRP: $223.90

Sale Price: $19.99 (91% off)

The A to Z Artificial Intelligence eBook Bundle

Master the growing field of AI, and you can work smarter by teaching your computers to work harder. There are applications for artificial intelligence in the worlds of robotics, big business, and gaming, all of which are covered in this series.

MSRP: $311.90

Sale Price: $19.99 (93% off)

The Complete Game Developer eBook Bundle

These guides will get you mastery of all the tools you need to make your game idea a reality. You'll get complete walkthroughs of not only platforms like Unity and Javascript, but the process of how to test your creation for bugs. Read the rest

DJ Earworm: 100 songs from the past decade in one mashup

Ten years, 100 songs, three minutes. Sheer. Fucking. Genius. Watch it before a Youtube copyright enforcement bot deletes it and DJ Earworm's channel with it. (via Metafilter) Read the rest

JOHN WILCOCK: The Day Kenneth Anger Walked Into The Pentagon to Distribute 93 Anti-War Talismans

Part Two of "LEVITATION OF THE PENTAGON" — Concluded Next Week

Read Part One: Applying for a Permit to Exorcise the Pentagon of Evil Spirits, Levitating It Ten Feet Off the Ground

From John Wilcock, New York Years, by Ethan Persoff and Scott Marshall.

(See all Boing Boing installments)

Read the rest

A racist cop bullies two black men for "acting suspicious," and he actually gets fired

Crazed Indiana officer Daryl Jones was fired after bullying two black men for "acting suspicious" after they bought a bunch of goods from Nordstrom Rack.

The unhinged officer came up to the men, who were sitting in their car in front of the department store, and asked for their ID. When the Nordstrom customers repeatedly asked why, the officer's only response was that they were acting suspicious. When they asked for the officer's name, he wouldn't give it to them. When they questioned his behavior, he said, "I got my rights to do anything I want to do, I’m a police officer."

Finally the now ex-officer called for backup, who realized what a jerk the officer was and let the guys go. Good thing the guys videotaped the incident (things get going at 1:15). Two hours after the chief constable watched it, Jones was fired. A refreshing ending to a common horror story.

According to NBC:

In the video posted to YouTube on Nov. 13, the description says the two men first noticed the officer watching them while they were at a Nordstrom Rack store in the Castleton neighborhood of Indianapolis...

According to the description of the 17-minute video posted a day after the incident, which has been viewed more than 300,000 times as of Tuesday morning, the men started filming when they began to exit the parking lot and the officer screamed he was going to run their plates.

"He watched us buy everything, and then followed us to the car," the YouTube video description says...The

Read the rest

Hilarious decal "fixes" a dented vehicle

From Hussy Horse Designs, this delightful Wile E. Coyote decal.

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Trump Jr. attacked on Twitter after his idiot tweet that questions Vindman's heroism

Trump Junior retweeted an article from the Federalist this morning called “Let’s Stop Pretending Every Impeachment Witness Is A Selfless Hero" about National Security Council Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who received a purple heart medal in 2004. Yep, from the boy (and son of Bone Spurs) who fled from his own book signing at UCLA on Sunday because he was afraid that his own fans were mad at him.

Of course it didn't take long for the Twitterverse to set things straight...

Via HuffPost and Raw Story

Image: by DonkeyHotey - Donald Trump Jr. - Caricature, CC BY-SA 2.0, Link Read the rest

Dredging Up What's "Under the Silver Lake"

Did you see this trailer for Under the Silver Lake about a year ago and think nothing of it? Lots of people did and dismissed it as a generic hipster-centric snoozefest. But a few interested people stuck around and read the checklist as a piece of comedy. Vinyl? Yes. Ridiculously nice apartments with one sole occupant? Yes. Struggling actors trying to make it in Hollywood? Yes. Pretentious bars? Yes. Violent Femmes? Sure, yes.

As much as these elements might seem like they'd make for a bland 30-something-centric film involving thousand yard stares and brunch, director David Robert Mitchell (It Follows) lampoons mumblecore, Los Angeles and "the male gaze."

The story in Silver Lake starts off innocently enough, wherein our protagonist Sam (Andrew Garfield) is caught staring at his sunbathing neighbor through binoculars and later notices signs of a neighborhood dog murderer. Perpetually unemployed (and unperturbed), Sam tracks down clues surrounding a disappearance and gets rapidly sucked into the lavish, oddball world of the Hollywood adjacent.

Though the plot reads a bit like a noir, it's difficult to describe this world as an "underbelly," seeing as the parties and high teas Sam goes to on his mock-chivalric quest are neither clouded in cigar smoke nor shot through shuttered blinds. The real hook of this film comes in the barrage of red herrings, corner-of-your-eye subplots and ridiculous clues that sometimes pan out, sometimes don't, and sometimes turn out to be redundant at best. In addition to all that, the film's (for lack of a better word) meta narrative allows you to go on a hunt for clues that parallel Sam's adventure. Read the rest

Terabytes of data leaked from an oligarch-friendly offshore bank

The Distributed Denial of Secrets Twitter account has published links to terabytes of data identified as raw data from the Cayman National Bank and Trust; Phineas Fisher (previously), the public-interest hacker(s) behind the Hacking Team breach, is credited with the leak. Read the rest

20 grams of melt-in-your hand gallium

Gallium is a metal that melts at 86 degrees F. It's more fun than playing with mercury, and probably safer, too (it *will* temporarily stain your skin gray though, because it's "wet" when liquid and will adhere to the crevices of your skin). My daughter's friend brought some over a couple of years ago, and it was such a hit at our house that we had to get some of our own. This 20 gram sample is on Amazon.

Image: DaveHax/YouTube Read the rest

Quiet Rooms: Illinois schools lead the nation in imprisoning very young, disabled children in isolation chambers

20 years ago, Illinois was rocked by a scandal after the widespread practice of locking schoolchildren, especially those with disabilities or special needs, in small, confining boxes was revealed. The teachers who imprisoned these children argued that they did so out of the interests of safety -- that of the imprisoned students, of the other students, and of school staff. Read the rest

Mysterious rolls of cash randomly appearing on sidewalks in tiny English village

Mysterious rolls of cash keep showing up on sidewalks in the small English village of Blackhall Colliery, on the North Sea coast of County Durham. In the last 5 years, around US$30,000 has been found in twelve rolls. Well, twelve rolls that the finders turned in to police anyway. From 9News:

"These bundles are always left in plain sight such as on pavements and discovered by random members of the public who have handed them in," Detective Constable John Forster said.

"I have looked into it and I am not thinking crime, drug dealing or money laundering. Drug dealers are not known for being reckless with their money."

Read the rest

Music that inspired 1980s Japanese environmental music composer Yukata Hirose

Yutaka Hirose is a Japanese composer who was a key figure in that country's ambient/environmental music scene of the 1980s that in recent years has been rediscovered by crate-diggers around the world. Hirose's "NOVA" (1986) is a classic of the genre, a soundscape that Misawa Home Corporation commissioned as a "soundtrack" for the prefabricated houses. While original LPs have sold for hundreds of dollars, WRWTFWW Records have recently reissued the record as an expanded double LP and double CD. (For a further exploration of Japanese environmental music of the 1980s, Light in the Attic Records' "Kankyō Ongaku: Japanese Ambient, Environmental & New Age Music 1980-1990" is a perfect portal.)

To celebrate the NOVA reissue, The Vinyl Factory asked Hirose to create a mix of music he was listening to and inspired by in the 1980s Listen above. It's a beautiful, sometimes-jarring, and totally compelling journey through avant-garde sounds of the time. Here's the tracklist:

1. Jan Steele – All Day 2. David Toop – Do The Bathosphere 3. Gavin Bryars – 1, 2, 1-2-3-4 4. Joan La Barbara – Poems 43, 44, 45 5. Meredith Monk – Waltz 6. Karlheinz Stockhausen – Stimmung 7. John Cage – Seven Haiku 8. Throbbing Gristle – Almost A Kiss 9. Robert Ashley – Yellow Man With Heart With Wings 10. The Flying Lizards – The Window 11. Henry Cow Little Red Riding Hood Hit The Road 12. Faust – Faust 13. CAN – Future Days 14. Tangerine Dream:Rubycon 15. Michael Nyman – Decay Music 16.

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"Softbody Tetris": what if tetronimoes were made of jello?

C4D4U's SOFTBODY TETRIS V16 is (as the name implies), the latest in a series of "softbody" simulations of Tetris, in which the tetronimoes are rubbery, jelly-like solids that glisten as they wobble into place. It's an incredibly soothing thing to watch (C4D4U calls them "ASMR for my eyes") and part of a wider genre of softbody sims. JWZ argues that this "becomes intolerable" upon the "realization that completed rows don't liquify" but if that's your thing, you need SOFTBODY TETRIS V9. Read the rest

Revisiting Operation Mindfuck

Over at Medium, BB pal Douglas Rushkoff explores how today's propaganda -- born in the 17th century to propagate the Catholic faith and reborn in the 20th century as "public relations" -- is no longer about convincing people to believe in whatever story the source happens to be selling. Today, Doug writes, "the primary goal of government propaganda is to undermine our faith in everything. Not just our belief in particular stories in the news, but our trust in the people who are telling the stories, the platforms, and fact-based reality itself." Interestingly, he traces this kind of systematic reality disruption to the counterculture. From Medium:

Before Watergate anyway, it felt as if the press and the government were on the same side, telling the same story to us all. There was no way for the underfunded counterculture to compete with mainstream reality programming—except by undermining its premises. The flower children couldn’t overwhelm Richard Nixon’s National Guard troops, but they could put daisies in the barrels of their rifles.

Taken to the extreme, this sort of activist satire became Operation Mindfuck, first announced in 1975 by Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea in their Illuminatus Trilogy!. The idea was to undermine people’s faith in government, authority, and the sanctity of consensus reality itself by pranking everything, all the time.

The idea of Operation Mindfuck was to break the trance that kept America at war, blindly consuming, and oblivious to its impact on the rest of the world. Destabilize the dominant cultural narrative through pranks and confusion.

Read the rest

Sand thieves believed to be behind epidemic of Chinese GPS jamming

Ship's captains and outside monitoring firms have reported waves of GPS jamming around Shanghai's ports, on a scale and of a severity never seen before: the jamming causes ships' locations to be incorrectly displayed and to jump around; the observations were confirmed via an anonymized (sic) data-set from a short-hire bike firm, whose bikes are also mysteriously appearing and disappearing at locations all through the region. The spoofing has created a massive local shipping hazard and has led to spectacular shipwrecks. Read the rest

Man helps beaver carry branch

This kind man assisted a beaver with a heavy burden. Read the rest

Glass screen protector for my Nintendo Switch

I use these screen protectors on my Nintendo Switch.

The Nintendo Switch gets handed from child to child. The Switch gets banged, bumped, dropped and treated like something a 5-year-old is struggling wrest from a 10-year-old. Screen protectors come and go, but thus far the Switch has been undamaged.

Three packs are nice.

[3 Pack] Screen Protector Tempered Glass for Nintendo Switch, iVoler Transparent HD Clear Anti-Scratch Screen Protector Compatible Nintendo Switch via Amazon Read the rest

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