"david dao"

Even when a Chicago cop is convicted of wrongdoing, a secret appeals court usually overturns it

Chicago boasts one of the nation's most corrupt police forces: Chicago PD ran an off-the-books secret torture site; stole millions from innocents and used the funds to buy illegal surveillance gear; has more than 125,000 outstanding abuse complaints; conducted an illegal extortion racket and a coverup that went to the highest levels; is systemically racist and corrupt; a force that tolerates cops who cover up and celebrate murder (no surprise that the force trained the ex-Gitmo torturer who beat Dr David Dao unconscious for refusing to give up his seat on a United flight). Read the rest

Two of the Chicago airport cops who beat up Dr David Dao got fired for lying about it (but not for the beating)

Two of the four Chicago Department of Aviation Security officers who beat United Airlines passenger Dr David Dao until he was unconscious, concussing him, breaking his nose and then dragging him off the plane, have been fired -- but not for administering the beating. Rather, they were fired for lying about it. One of the other two officers involved has quit and the final one got a two-day paid holiday ("suspension"). Read the rest

The Chicago airport cops who beat David Dao unconscious totally lied about it on their report

Chicago's Department of Aviation finally replied to the LA Times's Freedom of Information request for the police report on the public beating Chicago airport cops dealt to Dr David Dao when United Airlines decided to give his confirmed, paid seat to a crewmember and ordered him to vacate it. Read the rest

United's CEO just lost out on the Chairmanship of United's board

When United CEO Oscar Munoz lied about Dr David Dao, slandering the passenger that was beaten unconscious as a direct result of his employees enacting the policies he put in place, he was acting in the knowledge that he would shortly be elevated to the Chairmanship of United's board of directors. Read the rest

The Bureaucratic Style in American prose

After Colin Dickey wrote about United CEO Oscar Munoz's nonpology for the savage beating of Dr David Dao, he was taken to task for accusing the CEO of writing in the "passive voice."

The closer Dickey looked, the more he concluded that "passive voice" is not a good characterization of the style employed by corporate America; rather, the instantly recognizable "Bureaucratic Style" "makes use of both active and passive constructions, but its purpose is uniform: to erase and efface any active agent on the part of the bureaucracy."

Dickey's essay on Bureaucratic Style is fascinating.

To begin with, the bureaucratic style works to erase cause. Here is Munoz’s description of the start of the incident: “On Sunday, April 9, after United Express Flight 3411 was fully boarded, United’s gate agents were approached by crewmembers that were told they needed to board the flight.” Setting aside the passengers for a second, in this sentence there are two named actors: the gate agents and the crewmembers. You might expect, then, that this all started when the crewmembers approached the gate agents and told them they needed to board the flight. However, a closer reading of the syntax implies this is not the case; the crewmembers themselves “were told they needed to board the flight.” Who told them? The sentence does not make this clear, even though it is this unnamed actor, presumably a supervisor, who set this entire chain of events in motion. Deliberately pushed back as far off the stage as possible, there is no one here to responsibly hold accountable for subsequent events.

Read the rest

Lawyer of Dr. David Dao schools United Airlines in fantastic speech

Prominent lawyer Thomas Demetrio lambastes United Airlines – as well as all airlines and big corporations in general – for their bully culture in this outstanding speech at a press conference.

About airlines, he says, "They have the highest duty of care to provide protection and safety to its fair paying passengers. That was not done."

"For a long time, airlines – United in general – have bullied us. They have treated us less than we deserve."

Demetrio then describes what we should expect from airlines. "Here's what we want as a society: We want fairness in how people treat us. We want respect. And we want dignity. That's it! It's not a big deal. This seems so simple. Forget the law for a minute that requires common decency and treatment of passengers. Just treat us with respect like your really care."

This is the kind of speech that movements are made from.

The above is a ten-minute clip. Click here for the full hour-length speech. Read the rest

United Airlines CEO lied - David Dao was calm and polite, not "belligerent"

United CEO Oscar Munoz said that passenger David Dao was "disruptive and belligerent" when he was told that he was going to be kicked off the plane after he bought a ticket and too his seat. But this newly released video shows Dao to be quite calm and reasonable given the circumstances. In the end, Dao was beaten senseless, his nose was broken, teeth were knocked out, and he suffered a concussion. United filled the empty seat with one of its employees.

From Teen Vogue:

A post shared by People Magazine (@people) on Apr 12, 2017 at 1:40pm PDT

On Monday, a video clip surfaced of Chicago Department of Aviation security officials brutally dragging Dao down the aisle of the plane on Sunday night for refusing to involuntarily give up his seat on a United flight went viral on social media. Shortly after the incident, United CEO Oscar Munoz told employees in an email that Dao had acted “disruptive and belligerent," which, in his words, left officers with no choice. However, passenger Joya Cummings uploaded new footage to Facebook showing the moments leading up to the officers' assault on Dao, and it shows a very different story.

“I’m a physician. I have to work tomorrow at 8 o’clock,” he told officers calmly in the video. "No, I am not going. I am not going."

Soon after, officers threatened to "drag [him]" off the plane if he didn't comply. “Then drag me down,” Dao told them. “I am staying right there.”

Also, it looks like United didn't have the legal right to ask police to remove Dao. Read the rest

Scorpion stings man during flight on United Airlines

Watch it - if you're not beat up in a United Airlines seat, you might get stung. At least that's what happened to Richard Bell, a passenger flying from Houston to Calgary on Sunday, when a scorpion dropped from the overhead bin, landed in his hair, fell onto his tray table, and then zapped him.

This mishap occurred on the same day United passenger David Dao was beaten up on another flight for not "volunteering" to give up the seat he paid for. He was then dragged off the plane while unconscious.

Luckily, the scorpion did much less damage to Bell – he only suffered pain that "felt like a wasp sting." Other than that he was fine.

And as for the scorpion? It was flushed down the toilet in the aircraft.

Read the full story on The Washington Post.

Image by Papypierre1 Read the rest

Oversold, understated and authoritarian: debullshitifying the reporting on United's "removal" of Dr David Dao

As the scandal over a United passenger who was beaten unconscious and dragged off a plane when he refused to give up his seat for a deadheading crewmember unspools, there's a predictable torrent of bullshit about how United was in the right because something something private property, and let us not forget the great American sport of victim-blaming. Read the rest

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