"phil foglio"

Tee: You can't fix democracy by turning it off and on again

Cartoonist Phil Foglio (previously) writes, "I designed a cool t-shirt!" They're $22 from Offworld Designs. Read the rest

Kickstarting a new Girl Genius collection

Phil Foglio (previously) writes, "Studio Foglio is kickstarting a new Girl Genius Collection! The Incorruptible Library covers the adventures of Agatha Heterodyne and her friends as they journey beneath the streets of Paris. There they encounter hidden subterranean civilizations, forgotten labyrinths filled with secrets, and a healthy dollop of Adventure, Romance, and Mad Science!" Read the rest

Kickstarting the next Girl Genius collection

Phil Foglio, co-creator of the amazing Girl Genius comics, writes, "We are Kickstarting our latest Girl Genius collection; City of Lightning through April 12." Read the rest

Women of the Haunted Mansion cosplayers at SDCC

This year's San Diego Comic-Con masquerade featured a cosplayer team dressed as the "women of the Haunted Mansion" -- from a maid to a stretching portrait to a changing portrait to ballroom and graveyard ghosts, all doing a delightful dance routine. Read the rest

Kickstarting a new Girl Genius collection

Phil Foglio writes, "Woo hoo! Excitements abounds! Today Studio Foglio flipped the Big Red Switch and we have launched our latest Kickstarter. This one is for Girl Genius Volume 13- Agatha Heterodyne and the Sleeping City. Now, as some people might remember, we had a very successful Kickstarter last year. successful enough that you might be excused asking 'So what for do you need more money? Did you blow it all on coke' (On this point, you can rest assured. No one who does coke stays as fat as we are.) No, we calculated how much it would cost to get all of our books back into print, make tchotchkes like pins and patches and travel stickers, and hire us a business manager, and that is where the money went." Read the rest

Kickstarting a new Cheapass game with Patrick Rothfuss

Carol from the wonderful Cheapass Games writes, "Pairs is our latest project: a classic pub-style card game, designed by James Ernest and Paul Peterson. We've teamed up with Patrick Rothfuss to make decks with themes and artwork from the world of his Name of the Wind novels.

We still have 10 days left in the Kickstarter, and we've got over 3000 backers, and support that's passed $100,000. As the campaign grows, we're adding more card decks for backers to choose from." Read the rest

Kickstarting the next Girl Genius volume with Kaja and Phil Foglio

Kaja and Phil Foglio have launched a Kickstarter to fund the printing of volume 12 of the wonderful Girl Genius webcomic, and to reprint the older books. These are multi-award-winning, independent steampunk delights, and $30 gets you "an actual, dead-tree, SOFTCOVER copy of Girl Genius Volume 12: Agatha Heterodyne and the Siege of Mechanicsburg. 192 pages in full color. Shipped to you by means of one of the largest government agencies on Earth!"

Printing the actual books is our biggest single expense. The first print run of a typical volume costs in excess of US$25,000. If that seems high, you must remember that we print eight thousand of them, and they usually run to around 120 pages. Our latest volume, number 12, will be even more expensive, as it comes in at 192 pages, and we’ll be printing nine thousand of them, because eight thousand wasn’t enough last time. Exciting? Yes, but one can’t pay the printer with excitement.

We also have to ship the books. Actually, we have to ship them twice. Once from the printer to the fulfillment center, and once again from the fulfillment center to the customer. And whether a book is shrink–wrapped with thousands of its friends onto a pallet and loaded into a truck, or carefully packaged for individual shipping, several thousand pounds of books cost serious money to transport.

It's got a short fuse on it because they want to get the books in hand in time for San Diego Comic-Con. Act now! Read the rest

Gygax Magazine: Dragon reborn

Jayson sez, "Gygax magazine is a quarterly adventure-gaming magazine, created in the spirit of such iconic '80s journals as Dragon, White Dwarf, Adventure Gaming, and Pegasus. At the helm are Gary Gygax's two eldest sons, Luke & Ernest Gary Gygax Jr., along with Jayson Elliot, and Dragon magazine founder Tim Kask.

The first issue includes an article by Cory Doctorow on DMing for toddlers, as well as new comics from Phil Foglio (What's New With Phil & Dixie) and Rich Burlew (The Order of the Stick).

Gygax will launch its first issue this Saturday at The Brooklyn Strategist. The event, which is open to the public, will also have lots of gaming (including a massive AD&D 1E dungeon delve with the founder of Dwarven Forge) and a video Q&A with the staff. The whole event will be live-streamed at GygaxMagazine.com."

Gygax Magazine Read the rest

Hugo winners, 2011

Last night's Hugo Award ceremony at the World Science Fiction Convention in Reno were just great, and some damned fine writers, creators, editors and books were nominated and won. Some of the balloted works/writers you've seen reviewed here this year include:

* The Magicians by Lev Grossman (Campbell Award for Best New Writer, winner) * Zoo City by Lauren Beukes (Campbell Award for Best New Writer, nominee) * Lifecycle of Software Objects by Ted Chiang (Best Novella) * The Dervish House by Ian McDonald (Best Novel, nominee) * Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century, Volume 1: (1907–1948): Learning Curve, by William H. Patterson, Jr. (Best Related Work, nominee)

The winners were: * Best Novel (1813 ballots): Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis (Ballantine Spectra) * Best Novella (1467 ballots): The Lifecycle of Software Objects by Ted Chiang (Subterranean) * Best Novelette (1469 ballots): “The Emperor of Mars” by Allen M. Steele (Asimov’s, June 2010) * Best Short Story (1597 ballots): “For Want of a Nail” by Mary Robinette Kowal (Asimov’s, September 2010) * Best Related Work (1220 ballots): Chicks Dig Time Lords: A Celebration of Doctor Who by the Women Who Love It, edited by Lynne M. Thomas and Tara O’Shea (Mad Norwegian) * Best Graphic Story (1263 ballots) Girl Genius, Volume 10: Agatha Heterodyne and the Guardian Muse, written by Phil and Kaja Foglio; art by Phil Foglio; colors by Cheyenne Wright (Airship Entertainment) * Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form (1755 ballots): Inception, written and directed by Christopher Nolan (Warner) * Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form (1466 ballots): Doctor Who: “The Pandorica Opens/The Big Bang,” written by Steven Moffat; directed by Toby Haynes (BBC Wales) * Best Editor, Short Form (983 ballots): Sheila Williams * Best Editor, Long Form (898 ballots): Lou Anders * Best Professional Artist (1304 ballots): Shaun Tan * Best Semiprozine (1112 ballots): Clarkesworld, edited by Neil Clarke, Cheryl Morgan, Sean Wallace; podcast directed by Kate Baker * Best Fanzine (870 ballots): The Drink Tank, edited by Christopher J Garcia and James Bacon * Best Fan Writer (814 ballots): Claire Brialey * Best Fan Artist (993 ballots): Brad W. Read the rest

Girl Genius steampunk badges: zeppelins, trilobites and Tesla Rangers

So far, the standout retail moment at this year's World Science Fiction Convention in Reno are the very reasonably priced "Girl Genius" badges from Kaja and Phil Foglio, inspired by the Hugo-Award-winning webcomic of the same name. Worked with great trilobite and zeppelin motifs, the badges were apparently manufactured by the same supplier who does the collectible pins for the Disney parks, and have a good, solid heft. I'm also VERY fond of the old-timey sheriff's badge (cogtoothed, not starred) emblazoned with TESLA RANGERS and enlivened with little electrikal curlicues.

The New Airship Entertainment Online Store Read the rest

Phil Foglio on why he posted his Hugo-winning comic online

Mike sez, "Phil Foglio describes why he posted Hugo-winning comic Girl Genius online for free."

First of all, printing comic books is expensive. I figured that by not having to do the comic book we were saving close to $20,000 a year. When you lay out a comic book and then lay out a graphic novel, it's two entirely different jobs. You have to do it all over again. All we do now is sell the collections. Also, printing the comic was really expensive, and we were in a cash crunch at a particular time and we were like, "Is this really worth it?"

And thirdly, for years people had been coming up to me and saying "I would like to get into comics" and I had been saying "Screw comics. Do a webcomic. It's the wave of the future and your production costs are super low," and eventually I realized that instead of just giving this advice I should take it.

A lot of the success of Girl Genius I think could only have been done by a person like myself who had a long career building up an established name and being in independent publishing, because that meant I was publishing my own books. So when Girl Genius went online, we were able to sell people Girl Genius books from day one, whereas almost everybody, who starts a webcomic has to collect material before they get a book. It takes them sometimes up to two years before they can begin to monetize our core product.

Read the rest

Hugo Award winners and statsporn!

Last night I had the extreme pleasure of attending the Hugo Awards ceremony at the World Science Fiction Convention and of losing two Hugos to two of the nicest, most deserving people in science fiction: my friend and teacher Nancy Kress (Best Novella for "The Erdmann Nexus") and my friend and copyfight comrade Neil Gaiman (Best Novel for "The Graveyard Book"). Indeed, this may have been the strongest Hugo ballot in a decade. The pre-award reception was practically awash in awesomesauce, and the winners were, to a one, absolute mensches and geniuses.

I've pasted in the winners below, and thrown in a link to the Hugo Awards administrators' traditional infoporn dump of stats on who nominated and voted for what. My undying thanks to all of you who put Little Brother and True Names on the ballot. I've also thrown in the text of my undelivered Little Brother acceptance speech, because I can, and because it thanks a lot of people who deserve it.

Congrats to Boing Boing reader Jeremy Kratz on wiinning the Hugo Awards logo design competition!

Once I've got a fatter network pipe (this post is going out over the VIA Rail on-train WiFi), I'll upload my Hugo photos, which includes a shot of Neal Stephenson's undelivered acceptance speech for Anathem, which was translated into Ur by Jeremy Bornstein!

Best Novel: The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman (HarperCollins; Bloomsbury UK)

Best Novella: ''The Erdmann Nexus'' by Nancy Kress (Asimov's Oct/Nov 2008)

Best Novelette: ''Shoggoths in Bloom'' by Elizabeth Bear (Asimov's Mar 2008)

Best Short Story: ''Exhalation'' by Ted Chiang (Eclipse Two)

John W.

Read the rest

Holy Surveillance: Tammy & Jim Bakker & Friends

BB reader wishbook says,

With the recent passing of televangelist Tammy Faye Messner, I thought it was a fitting time to share the shrill sounds and sights of the 1975 album, "Oops! There Comes A Smile: Songs & Stories By Jim & Tammy & Their Friends."

To that end, I've flickr'd scans of the album and created a link to the creepy track, "God Is Watching You," in which the Tammy-voiced pig puppet proclaims "he sees everything you do, and he hears everything you say; my God is watching all the time!" For the penitent or masochistic, there is alo a megaupload link to the entire album.

Link. Also noteworthy is the lyrical name of the woman to whom this one belonged, visible in this larger jpeg: Link.

Reader comment: Anonymous says,

The lizard looks suspiciously like the Winslow from various Phil Foglio comics, chiefly Buck Godot. Perhaps the Bakkers were really Winslowists in disguise!

Dan, from The ARChive of Contemporary Music, says:

I noticed that you posted the cover of Tammy Faye's "Oops, There Comes A Smile" today and I wanted to let you know that last week we posted that and two other Tammy Faye covers, as well as a ten-record discography of people in the Bakker/PTL orbit (mostly Tammy, but Jim and others as well - yes, we have all of them in our collection).

You can see the covers here: Link (Click on them for a larger view.)

While "Oops" was perhaps the "best" for music, "Run Towards the Roar" was everyone at the ARChive's favorite cover.

Read the rest

Foglio fan-art for Good Omens

Phil Foglio, one of the premier genre toon artists, has produced a two-page fan-art tribute to Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman's spectacular and hilarious end-of-the-world novel Good Omens.

Link

(Thanks, Zed!)

Read the rest

:)