knolling

Japanese inn with "self-driving" robotic slippers and other autonomous amenities

Nissan, to show off its autonomous parking tech, outfitted an inn in Hakone, Japan with "self-parking slippers," autonomous floor cushions that tidy themselves, and a TV remote control that straightens itself on the coffee table. While obviously a marketing gimmick, self-knolling anything is quite appealing to me. ProPILOT Park Ryokan (Nissan)

Read the rest

Things Organized Neatly: The Art of Arranging the Everyday

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Things Organized Neatly: The Art of Arranging the Everyday

by Austin Radcliffe

Universe

2016, 104 pages, 7.8 x 10 x 0.8 inches

$17 Buy a copy on Amazon

Simply as advertised. Rows and rows of diverse things neatly organized. This process is often called knolling. The applied organizing logic varies: it can be by size, by color, by age; in rows, in grids, in fitted mosaics. The effect is always hypnotic. Seemingly meaningless collections gain intelligence and order which focuses attention on the parts. The book ranges wide and far in the type of things that are inspected. You will soon knoll your own.

Read the rest

Things Organized Neatly: a book of knollish greatness

The Things Organized Neatly blog (previously), which celebrates the kentucky art of knolling, is now a gorgeous, essential book filled with photos of meticulously arranged wonders of all description. Read the rest

Things, organized neatly: a kentucky site for knollers

Things Organized Neatly is a Tumblr devoted to excellent knolling photos in which things are, well, organized neatly. Zomg, but this tickles something vulnerable in my hindbrain. Show here: a RepRap (in bits), and Cannoli in Buenos Aires.

Things Organized Neatly

(Thanks, Fipi Lele!) Read the rest

How to eat a corn in 10 seconds

how to eat a corn in 10 seconds via reddit's "Learn Useless Talents" section Read the rest

Knolling: a verb for those who like things nice and kentucky

Here is an incredibly useful verb for you: to Knoll. Knolling is "the process of arranging like objects in parallel or 90 degree angles as a method of organization." It was coined by Andrew Kromelow, a janitor who worked for Frank Gehry.

At the time, Gehry was designing chairs for Knoll, a company famously known for Florence Knoll's angular furniture. Kromelow would arrange any displaced tools at right angles on all surfaces, and called this routine knolling, in that the tools were arranged in right angles—similar to Knoll furniture.[1] The result was an organized surface that allowed the user to see all objects at once.

Here is Tom Sachs's Always Be Knolling manifesto:

* Scan your environment for materials, tools, books, music, etc. which are not in use. * Put away everything not in use. If you aren't sure, leave it out. * Group all 'like' objects. * Align or square all objects to either the surface they rest on, or the studio itself.

Knoll (verb)

(via Making Light)

(Image: A scanned page from Tom Sachs' 2009 zine "Ten Bullets". Chohlasa/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA)) Read the rest

:)