New sextortion phishing scam uses target's harvested password

A new twist on an old email scam making the rounds addresses its recipients by name and uses an actual password (hopefully deprecated). They attempt to blackmail victims, and it's definitely a little anxiety-inducing to see an old password written out. Read the rest

Deflating Pikachu aggressively pulled offstage during performance

At the recent Pokémon World Festival in Incheon, South Korea, a Pikachu deflated midway through a dance. Fortunately, agents specially-trained for such emergencies acted quickly and decisively. (See the action at 1:12 in the video.) (via Laughing Squid)

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How crappy is your job? 200 jobs, ranked

For about 30 years, CareerCast has ranked jobs. Their best jobs in 2017 include analysts, engineers, scientists, and a few surprises like dieticians and speech pathologists. The crappiest job is newspaper reporter, which barely edged out broadcaster. Read the rest

Cows try to befriend grumpy turtle

Cows investigate a turtle

This turtle has bovinophobia. Read the rest

Making rainbow magic with dissolving Skittles

Hot water on a ring of Skittles! (via The Kid Should See This) Read the rest

Donald Duck is a quite effective and surreal math teacher

"Donald in Mathmagic Land" was released in 1959. As Walt Disney said, "The cartoon is a good medium to stimulate interest."

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Class action suit: smart sex toys spy on their owners and transmit their masturbation habits

An anonymous woman has filed a class action suit against Standard Innovation, a company that makes We-Vibe "smart" sex toys that record exactly how their owners masturbate and transmit detailed dossiers, along with personally identifying information, back to the company. Read the rest

Iraq stops using $60,000 dowsing rods for bomb detection

After the July 3 suicide bomb that killed 300 people in Baghdad, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi banned the use of the ADE 651. a fake bomb detector made by British fraudsters, who claimed the gadgets could detect bombs, ivory, drugs, and golf balls. The Iraqi military had purchased $60 million worth of the bogus devices. The founder of the company that made the useless devices is in prison serving a ten-year sentence. I think he should spend a lot more time than that behind bars, since a great many people died by putting their trust in the devices.

ABC News

Faced with mounting criticism, former Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki ordered an investigation into the effectiveness of the devices in 2010. The outcome was inconclusive, and they continued to be used.

The head of the Interior Ministry's bomb squad department, Jihad al-Jabri, was convicted in 2012 and sentenced to four years in prison for accepting a bribe from the British manufacturers. But the case against him did not address whether the wands were effective. Many Iraqis believe he was a scapegoat to protect more senior Iraqi officials from prosecution.

Politics also may have played a role.

After the July 3 blast, al-Abadi fired the military officer in charge of Baghdad's security and accepted the resignation of Interior Minister Mohammed Salem al-Ghabban, who was in charge of police.

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Who got paid what at Woodstock

Hendrix, $18K; Baez, $10K; CCR, $10k; Janis, $7500; Sha Na Na, $700; the Dead, $2250. Multiply by 6.37 for inflation adjustment. (Thanks, Spooky!) Read the rest