"Tingle Monsters" is an incredibly unsettling ASMR feminist horror film

If you don't get chills from the ASMR audio experience of Tingle Monsters, then you'll definitely get them from the looming tension and sheer overwhelming sexist dread that oozes throughout this ten-minute short film (especially in the expertly-created comments section that helps to drive the plot). It is weirdly kind of relaxing, until it's absolutely not. Here's the official synopsis:

An ASMR vlogger with a devoted fan base returns from an extended absence with a livestream that spirals out of control.

Writer/director/actress Alexandra Serio had this to say as well:

I was compelled to make "Tingle Monsters" because I believe that violence against women truly starts with words. With this in mind, I designed the film’s unconventional viewing experience to feel like a real ASMR livestream.

Shot in screenlife format with no extra score or sound design, the film is designed to transport viewers into a scenario they are already familiar with—the harassment of women on the internet—ultimately inviting the audience to examine the link between what we say and think about women affects their real-world treatment.

I firmly believe that through gender parity and telling women-driven narratives we can begin to change the world. But we must start by taking a sobering look at where we currently are. Tingle Monsters aims to do that.

Serio also did a great interview with Pasteoffering a behind-the-scenes perspective on this creepy little capsule of awful internet intersections.

The movie is only ten-minutes long, and definitely unsettling. I haven't much followed the ASMR phenomenon, but Serio uses the genre conventions deftly here to create a creeping experience that — I suspect — accurately reflects the horrors that often accompany simply being a woman on the Internet. Read the rest

Here's the gross sexual remark Jim Carrey made to a woman reporter while promoting 'Sonic the Hedgehog'

During a promotional event for the movie Sonic the Hedgehog, Jim Carrey was asked by Heat Magazine's Charlotte Long if the actor had anything remaining on his bucket list (things one wants to do or see in life before “kicking the bucket”).

“Just you”, he replied. Read the rest

Natalie Portman's Oscars outfit was embroidered with the names of women directors who were shafted for nominations

Only 5 women have ever been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director — and only one of those nominations happened in the past decade.

So this year, Natalie Portman decided to make a point. She wore a Dior-designed cape to the award show that was embroidered with the names of the women who were snubbed for Best Director nominations, including Lorene Scafaria (Hustlers); Greta Gerwig (Little Women); Lulu Wang (The Farewell); Melina Matsoukas (Queen & Slim); Alma Har'el (Honey Boy); and Céline Sciamma (Portrait of a Lady on Fire).

As Portman explained to the Los Angeles Times, "I wanted to recognize the women who were not recognized for their incredible work this year in my subtle way."

I don't normally pay much attention to the Oscars, in part because I know that it's always going to be a disappointing Old Boys Club showing of the exact same kinds of movies every time. And, well, that's exactly what Portman's pointing out here. There are plenty of cynical things I could say about celebrity gossip and performative protest and all. But right now, I think it's just important: fuck yeah Natalie. Good on you. Here's hoping that it makes even a little bit of difference.

Image: Gage Skidmore (CC 2.0) Read the rest

Study: Online teachers get higher ratings when students think they're male

Students who think they're being taught by women give lower evaluation scores for those teachers than students who think they are being taught by men -- no matter who was actually teaching them. Read the rest