Experimental documentary shows one African migrant's harrowing journey to Europe

Fabio Palmieri directed IRREGULARS, a film about Cyrille Kabore, who tried time and time again to enter Europe after leaving his native Ghana at age 20. Read the rest

This film geek's jet-setting photojournal matches movie stills to locations

German blogger Andrea David, aka filmtourismus, travels the globe to find the exact spot where movies and TV shows were filmed. Read the rest

RIP Stephen Parr, Oddball Films' eccentric archivist

For connoisseurs of rare film, few experiences could top Oddball Films' meticulously curated one-time-only screenings from their extensive rare film collection. This short documentary looks at founder Stephen Parr, who died October 24. Read the rest

Cool short documentary on gear for filming bioluminescence

This neat short film explains the specialized split-beam camera Martin Dorhn developed to film bioluminescent animals without disturbing them. As the information comes through the lens, it's split so one camera captures infrared and the other captures the bioluminescence. Read the rest

How did 19 films each get an F on CinemaScore?

CinemaScore is basically an influential exit poll at movie theatres. Despite over 30 years of scores, only 19 films currently hold the dubious distinction of getting an F. Vulture's Kevin Lincoln found a few patterns. Read the rest

Fantastic t-shirt: The Cure meets The Exorcist

Perfect execution by the folks at Wear Dinner: CureExorcist t-shirt Read the rest

Star Wars: Episode IX director Colin Trevorrow is out

Colin Trevorrow will no longer be the director of Star Wars: Episode IX. From the Hollywood Reporter:

"Lucasfilm and Colin Trevorrow have mutually chosen to part ways on Star Wars: Episode IX. Colin has been a wonderful collaborator throughout the development process, but we have all come to the conclusion that our visions for the project differ. We wish Colin the best and will be sharing more information about the film soon," read a Lucasfilm statement...

Lucasfilm and Colin Trevorrow have mutually chosen to part ways on Star Wars: Episode IX. Colin has been a wonderful collaborator throughout the development process, but we have all come to the conclusion that our visions for the project differ. We wish Colin the best and will be sharing more information about the film soon.

Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that script issues have continued to be a sore spot throughout Episode IX’s development, with Trevorrow having repeated stabs at multiple drafts. In August, Jack Thorne, the British scribe who wrote the upcoming Julia Roberts-Jacob Tremblay movie Wonder, was tapped to work on the script.

Sources say that the working relationship between Trevorrow and Lucasfilm head Kathleen Kennedy became unmanageable. Kennedy, who had already been through one director firing/replacement on the Han Solo spinoff movie, was not eager for a sequel and tried to avoid this decision.

Read the rest

Filmmakers braved brutal arctic conditions to make this stunning film

Ghosts of the Arctic is a collaboration by Untitled Film World that captures some remarkably intimate images of wildlife in the coldest and most remote corners of the world. Read the rest

Short film asks "Where Do Ideas Come From?"

David Lynch, Chuck Close, Susan Orlean, and a sampling of others describe the mysteries of inspiration that generate their ideas in this short but sweet film by Andrew Norton. Read the rest

Suspenseful short film about witnessing someone pushed onto subway tracks

The Push is a short, taut psychological horror film about how a woman's life unravels after she witnesses a stranger get pushed off a subway platform onto the tracks. Read the rest

Counting cuts in 'There Will Be Blood' yields interesting insights

Cinemetrics is an emerging field of media studies, and NerdWriter deftly applies cinemetrics to There Will Be Blood to mine it for insights. Read the rest

Heads up film fans: Here’s a list of female critics of color to follow

Given that film criticism is overwhelmingly white and male, film critic (and great Twitter follow) Valerie Complex decided to put together a list of women of color currently working in the field. She points out that while they may be underrepresented at larger mainstream publications, there are still many talented women of color working at smaller sites, self-publishing, or freelancing. And as she notes:

The perspectives of women of color are needed now more than ever. Especially, with the overwhelming amount of tone deaf articles produced in the media as of late (mainly by white men and women). In the Google age, why people are still oblivious to women of color who write and review film and entertainment is beyond me. But alas, here I am, writing this to inform the masses that in fact, women of color love film, love entertainment, like to write about it, and write about it very well.

Complex’s ever-growing list includes information on which sites these women write for as well as links to their personal Twitter handles. So if you’re a person who enjoys following film critics on Twitter, consider adding some (or all!) of these ladies to your feed. You can see the full list over on Black Girl Nerds. Read the rest

The oddly ubiquitous sliding scenes of the ’80s and ’90s

Though it might not be the most obvious film trope, this new Fandor video points out that movies in the ’80s and ’90s were filled with scenes in which characters went down some kind of slide. Fandor posits that these scenes were designed to mimic the feeling of an amusement park ride or water slide, which were becoming increasingly popular at the time. And they provided a kind of thrilling visual escapism from the turbulent social and political climate of the era. You can watch the full video essay right here:

[via The A.V. Club] Read the rest

Wistful film of stop-motion 3D printed figures

Elodie Ponçon designed and printed these cute lighted figurines for WHITE, a wistful story about conformity and imperfection. Read the rest

You could own the light-up dance floor from Saturday Night Fever

The fantastic light-up dance floor from Saturday Night Fever (1977) will go up for auction in a couple of weeks. The 24' x 36' floor, outfitted with more than 250 lights, was built and installed at Brooklyn's 2001 Odyssey nightclub specifically for the film. When the place closed in 2005, former employee Vito Bruno bought it. Auction house Profiles in History expects it to fetch $1 to $1.5 million.

Can you dig it? I knew that you could.


Read the rest

Great opening title sequence for film on paralyzed hit man

I finally got around to checking out Tiszta Szívvel (Kills on Wheels), the Hungarian film about a paralyzed hit man. The opening titles really set the tone. Read the rest

RIP John Severson, Surfer Magazine founder

John Severson, the iconic figure of surfing media, has died at age 83. His 1961 film Big Wednesday is arguably the greatest of the early surf films, part of a lifetime of innovations in surf media. Read the rest

More posts