Lenovo's 25th anniversary Thinkpad corrects years' worth of wrong turns

I am a die-hard Thinkpad user: they have the best warranty service of any laptop, by orders of magnitude, they're rugged enough to survive book tours, and it's very easy to install GNU/Linux on them (which is a good thing, given Lenovo's penchant for preinstalling spyware on the stock OS). Read the rest

FTC settles with Lenovo over selling laptops deliberately infected with Superfish spyware

The Federal Trade Commission has announced a settlement with Lenovo over the 2015 revelation that the company pre-installed malware called "Superfish" on its low-end models, which allowed the company to spy on its customers, and also left those customers vulnerable to attacks from third parties, who could exploit Superfish's weakened security. Read the rest

Review: Lenovo Yoga Book

Lenovo's Yoga Book is the most striking personal computer I've seen in years. More than the original iPhone, or Sony's X505, or the Messagepad, here's technology that seems a few years ahead of schedule. It's compact, attractive and thinner than anything else that might be called a laptop. Imagine two hinged pieces of black glass, one of which glows with the internet and the other with Okudagrams, and you have the Yoga Book. Read the rest

Linux "lockout" tangle snarls Lenovo

After failing to install Linux on a recent Lenovo laptop, a Reddit user claims to have received a short reply from Lenovo's support team: "This system has a Signature Edition of Windows 10 Home installed. It is locked per our agreement with Microsoft." Read the rest

Lenovo Yoga Book looks like a futuristic movie prop

In "shut up and take my money, maybe" news, Lenovo's new Yoga Book makes Microsoft's Surface look like ENIAC. It's a cheap, unbelievably slim tablet computer, yet promises the genuine utility of a laptop by unusual means: a Wacom-powered touchpad that doubles as a keyboard. The Verge is so impressed its got a longread up already.

But it’s the other half of the Yoga Book that makes it special and different from the many tablets already out there. Where you might expect there to be a physical keyboard or even a second screen, instead Lenovo opted for a specialized, touch-sensitive panel. Open up the Yoga Book, and you’ll see a flat, black expanse. Dimly glowing lights outline a keyboard and trackpad, or you can tap a button and it switches into a pen-recognition mode, powered by Wacom technology. Because it’s a Wacom surface, you can even put a stack of paper on top of the panel and write notes with real ink that are instantly digitized. The panel is attached to the screen with a hinge comprised of 130 different pieces and can be rotated behind the display entirely, similar to how the keyboard on Lenovo’s Yoga laptop line works.

Whether this thing is worthwhile will come down to typing on that flat, glassy panel. There's a mention of "haptic feedback." Either they nailed it or they didn't—and it would be the greatest technical feat in this thing by far if they did. Read the rest

Yet another pre-installed spyware app discovered on Lenovo computers

A factory refurbished Thinkpad shipped with Windows 7 and a scheduler app that ran once a day, collecting usage data about what you do with your computer and exfiltrating it to an analytics company. Read the rest