Neil Young catches a record store selling bootlegs of his music

In 1971 Neil Young went to a record store and discovered they were selling bootleg LPs of his music. Young asked the clerk why the record store was carrying the bootlegs. The clerk played dumb ("I don't listen to records, so I don't know. I listen to tapes.") Young didn't like it and called the owner and told him he planned to take the LPs without paying for them. Read the rest

Musicians tend to hate it when Republicans use their music

When Neil Young objected to the bizarre use of his music during Donald Trump's presidential campaign announcement, it wasn't anyone's first rodeo. There is a long, proud history of Republican politicians not listening to the words of songs they don't get permission to use.

1. Springsteen objected to Reagan’s use of the song “Born in the U.S.A.” during the 1984 election. 2. Reagan also got dinged in 1984 by John Cougar Mellencamp for “Pink Houses.” Bobby McFerrin objected to George H.W. Bush using the song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” in 1988. 3. Sam & Dave objected to Bob Dole using the song “Soul Man” in 1996.

Sting offers a "rare bit of bipartisanship," objecting to Al Gore's use of "Brand New Day" in the 2000 election, as well as Bush's use of "Brand New Day" in the 2000 election. Read the rest