Photographers captured shots of mortar exploding in the instant before their deaths

A mortar shell exploded during a training exercise in Afghanistan in July 2013, killing four Afghan soldiers and a U.S. Army photographer, Specialist Hilda Clayton. Clayton was training one of them in photojournalism, and both were shooting as the shell exploded.

The photos were released by the U.S. Army today. Clayton's is below, the unnamed student's above.

The photos were published with the permission of the Clayton family.

The Army said that "not only did Clayton help document activities aimed at shaping and strengthening the [US-Afghan] partnership but she also shared in the risk by participating in the effort."

The visual information specialist, who was from the US state of Georgia, has had a photography award named in her honour by the Department of Defense.

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The NY Times' Lively Morgue

Two young lesbians outside NY City Hall, 1974

The New York Times' tumblr of photos from its voluminous archive is full of impactful and gorgeous moments.

May 23, 1974: A kiss outside City Hall, where gay rights activists had gathered to show support for a gay rights bill up for a vote at the City Council. The anti-discrimination measure was defeated, 22 to 19, but the bill’s backers vowed to resubmit the following week, although they would “not press for action until after the November election.” It didn’t pass until 1986.

Photos include "back stories", literally notes on the back of a photo to add context including how the photo was used, how much the photographer was paid, and the published caption, if applicable.

via The Lively Morgue. Read the rest

To the Village Square – a photojournalist’s collection of anti-nuke images that span the last 40 years

Although the No Nukes slogan hearkens back to a louder, more passionate era of demonstrators of the 1970s, To the Village Square is a stark reminder that nuclear disasters are still happening, and that it still takes a village of voices – and images – to raise awareness.

Photojournalist Lionel Delevingne, who moved from France to the US in the 1970s, has been documenting the “No Nukes” crusade for almost four decades through his raw and striking photographs. His candid images of passionate demonstrators and disaster-stricken regions and their victims have been published in Vanity Fair, Newsweek, The New York Times, National Geographic, and many other publications. From the protestors of the Seabrook Station in Massachusetts to the disasters of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, Delevingne has captured the emotions, devastation and unity brought about by the anti nuclear movement.

See sample pages from this book at Wink. Read the rest