100-year-old "Lobster Lady" gets a film about her unusual life

Virginia Oliver is the oldest licensed lobster fishing person in the state of Maine — and, her local Rockland Historical Society suspects, possibly the entire world. She began lobstering in 1928, when she was just 8 years old, and still goes out three times a week with her son, depending on the weather. She was supposed to be the Grand Marshall of the Maine Lobster Festival this year until it was cancelled because of COVID-19, but she still got to celebrate this crazy in fashion with this short film about her life that aired on Maine Coast TV on June 6th — Oliver's 100th birthday.

Her advice for a long life of lobstering is simple: "I have friends. Maybe they've lost their husbands. They don't do nothin'. You got to keep going."

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Why Yoko Ono once performed backup vocals for "Rock Lobster" onstage with The B-52's

In February 2002, Yoko Ono took the stage with the B-52's during a New York performance of "Rock Lobster." The story about how she got there is fascinating and I'm surprised this is the first time I'm hearing of it. It begins in June 1980 when John Lennon heard the song and was inspired to start making music again after a long creative lull. The song's unusual backing vocals reminded him of Yoko Ono's style.

John Lennon, in a 1980 Rolling Stone interview:

"I was at a dance club one night in Bermuda... Upstairs, they were playing disco, and downstairs, I suddenly heard 'Rock Lobster' by the B-52's for the first time. Do you know it? It sounds just like Yoko's music, so I said to meself, 'It's time to get out the old axe and wake the wife up!' We wrote about twenty-five songs during those three weeks, and we've recorded enough for another album."

Writer Brian Scott MacKenzie:

"Rock Lobster" lit a fuse of inspiration that flared into Lennon’s 2-LP set Double Fantasy (1980), plus a posthumous release, Milk and Honey (1984). Without the B-52's, our world might lack "Beautiful Boy (Darling Boy)," "Watching the Wheels," "Woman," "(Just Like) Starting Over," and "Nobody Told Me."

Atlanta Magazine (2013):

"I said, 'That’s Yoko!,'" Lennon recalled that fall in an interview with the BBC. "I thought there were two records going at once or something. Because it was so her. I mean, this person had studied her... I called her and I said, 'You won’t believe this, but I was in a disco and there was somebody doing your voice.

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