The Mandalorian as a spaghetti western

Disney's The Mandalorian is the contemporary Star Wars production people actually like and has already wriggled deep into the folds of pop culture. Much of the meme-orializing centers on "Baby Yoda", of course, but the show pays tribute to westerns in depth and that's what's honored in this handsome edit by Kingkida.

Now that the amazing first season of The Mandalorian is complete, I decided to go back and update my Sergio Leone inspired trailer. Thanks for all the feedback on the last one. I incorporated a lot of your suggestions, but I'm sure I butchered more Italian in this pass as well!

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Rare trio of life size posters from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly offered this weekend

A trio of iconic posters for the world premiere of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (PEA, 1966) is set to star in Heritage Auctions’ upcoming Movie Posters Signature Auction, July 30-31. The final epic from Sergio Leone’s Man with No Name trilogy, it is ranks amongst the best westerns ever produced. Each poster features one of the three stars; Eastwood, Van Cleef and Wallach. The set was produced for the film’s December, 1966 world premiere in Rome, a full year before the American release. Each measuring 39” X 110,” they are easily the most powerful posters created for the film. The scarcity of these linen pieces is second to none, as very few from the minuscule production run were saved.

Full Auction Description:

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (PEA, 1966). Italian Premiere Displays Set of 3 (39" X 110"). Following the success of A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More, audiences were clamoring for more of director Sergio Leone's brash new style of Western. Executives at United Artists approached Leone, screenwriter Luciano Vincenzoni, and producer Alberto Grimaldi to gauge their interest in a third film.

A deal was struck insuring a budget of $1.3 million and production was soon underway. In Spain, an international cast and crew was assembled which featured Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach in the feature roles. But even with a powerhouse director and three first rate stars, the production was plagued with mishaps, several of which threatened the very lives of the stars. Read the rest