St. Bernard sets Guinness World Record for longest dog tongue

This is Mochi, a St. Bernard from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, who set a Guinness Word Record for her impressive tongue. Mochi is a rescue dog now happily living with Carla and Craig Rickert. From Laughing Squid:

According to Carla, Mochi came to them as an abused and neglected two year old, but quickly became an integral part of the family. Carla also revealed that Mochi absolutely adores peanut butter.

Mo is resilient, comical, loving and eternally grateful and loyal to us – her forever family. This once abused and neglected pup has taught us that it’s okay to be different. We are proud of her unique feature… Officially measured by a vet at 18.58 cm (7.3 in) – the equivalent of two-and-a-half Jenga blocks in a row – Mochi’s was verified as the Longest tongue on a dog (current).

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Why a cat's tongue is covered with tiny claws that feel like sandpaper

From Deep Look:

Cats’ tongues are covered in little spines called “papillae” that look like tiny hooks. Cats use their tongues to groom and the spines do a great job of detangling knots....

Cats spend much of their day cleaning themselves- up to half of their waking hours! Cats are ambush predators and they need to stay clean in order to remain hidden from their prey. Prey species tend to be on the lookout for danger, and one whiff of the wrong odor can give the cat away.

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Gentleman builds tongue robot to lick cartoon girls

Mansun, who blogs at Omocoro.jp, constructed an "auto licking machine" to lick cartoon girls. [via] Read the rest

Giraffes make Gene Simmons jealous

Observe a 20-inch tongue in action.

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Tongue is not the strongest muscle in the body

It's actually multiple muscles, and the myth may have emerged because you've probably never felt your tongue get tired. Even still, it isn't the strongest muscle system. The honor of strongest single muscle likely belongs to the masseter, in your jaw. From Scientific American:
By sticking a pliable air-filled bulb into a subject’s mouth, scientists can measure the maximal pressure the tongue can exert on an object. This device, called an Iowa oral performance instrument, is placed on the tongue and subjects are asked to push it toward the roofs of their mouths as hard as they can. Scientists also use this bulb to measure endurance, or how long the tongue can hold a certain posture.
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