Vocal Joystick for accessibility

University of Washington researchers are developing a new "Vocal Joystic" interface to make software more accessible for people who don't have use of their hands or arms. The software converts simple vowel sounds and other intonations into cursor movement. The louder the sound, the faster the cursor moves. Saying "K-Ch" represents a mouse click and release. Follow the link for a video demonstration. From the University of Washington Office of News:

"A lot of people ask: 'Why don't you just use speech recognition?'" (electrical engineering professor Jeffrey) Bilmes said. "It would be very slow to move a cursor using discrete commands like 'move right' or 'go faster.' The voice, however, is able to do continuous commands quickly and easily." Early tests suggest that an experienced user of Vocal Joystick would have as much control as someone using a handheld device...

"While people use their voices to communicate with just words and phrases," Bilmes said, "the human voice is an incredibly flexible instrument, and can do so much more."

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