Google releases set of beautiful, freely usable icons


They're licensed CC-BY-SA and designed for use in mobile apps and other interactive stuff -- there's 750 in all! It's part of Google's Material Design project.

Read the rest

When can the police search your computer/phone?


The Electronic Frontier Foundation has updated its indispensable "Know Your Rights" guide for dealing with police search requests for your phone, computer, and other devices.

Know Your Rights [Hanni Fakhoury and Nadia Kayyali/EFF]

Why (and how) games are art


I sat down for an interview with the LA Times's Hero Complex to talk about my book In Real Life (I'm touring it now: Chicago tomorrow, then Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, Palo Alto, San Francisco, Warsaw, London...), and found myself giving a pretty good account of why games are art, and how the art of games works:

Read the rest

Justin Hall at XOXO

Justin describes his life as an early Web writer, why it made him happy and how it nearly destroyed him, and who it turned him into. It's a talk that's uplifting and sad and funny and absolutely worth your time. (via Waxy)

Chinese Supreme Court makes service providers liable for "human flesh search engine"

Chinese Internet services are blessed and cursed with mobs who track down the personal details of people suspected of corruption or just bad public behavior, shaming them in a way that is highly public and indelible.

Read the rest

Malware needs to know if it's in the Matrix


Once a security researcher discovers a new strain of malicious software -- running a virtual machine on a test-bench -- and adds its signature to anti-virus and network monitor blacklists, it's game over. So today's malware devotes enormous energy to figuring out if it's running on a real computer, or inside one of its enemies' virtual worlds.

Read the rest

Umbrella Revolution's projector guerrillas splash huge messages on public buildings


The Add Oil project lets anyone in the world write a message of support to Hong Kong's protesters, which is then beamed in 16' tall letters on the sides of buildings near the protests.

Read the rest

How AIs are rewriting photographic history


If you send your holiday photos to Google's Autoawesome processor, it will snip out the best smiles and poses and combine them to make pictures of scenes that never actually happened.

Read the rest

How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World

Steven Johnson blends the history of science with keen social observation to tell the story of how our modern world came about—and where it’s headed. Cory Doctorow reviews How We Got to Now, also a six-part PBS/BBC series, which ties together a lifetime of work

Read the rest

Great ideas that changed the world, and the people they rode in on

To inaugurate the publication of his brilliant new book How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World (also a PBS/BBC TV series), Steven Johnson has written about the difficult balance between reporting on the history of world-changing ideas and the inventors credited with their creation

Read the rest

Social Justice Warriors and the New Culture War

Laurie Penny, author of Unspeakable Things: Sex, Lies and Revolution explains “Social Justice Warriors” and why they’re winning.

Read the rest

Tickets for the UK ORGCon on sale now!


Ruth from the Open Rights Group says, "We are really proud of the amazing people Open Rights Group are bringing you as speakers at this year's national digital rights conference."

Read the rest

Daughter of Hong Kong leader thanks "taxpayers" for diamonds on Facebook


Chai Yan Leung thanked the taxpayers who paid for it, and then dismissed her critics as non-taxpayers, since employed people wouldn't have time to comment on Facebook.

Read the rest

Emergent: a realtime Internet rumor tracker


It's like Snopes for Twitter, from Columbia U's journalism school.

Read the rest

CEO of stalkerware company arrested

Hammad Akbar, a Pakistani national and CEO of Invocode, marketers of Stealthgenie, was arrested in LA on Saturday and charged with a variety of offenses related to making, marketing and selling "interception devices."

Read the rest