Snappy response to sexist harrasser


Frank Wu writes, "Brianna Wu is a game developer and a frequent writer about gender issues in tech. As such, she frequently receives harassing, unpleasant emails. She got pissed off and wrote an awesome response to one here."

I got a harassing email today, and decided to respond with this letter. (Thanks, Frank!)

Fark prohibits misogyny in new addition to moderator guidelines

Drew from FARK: "the FArQ will be updated with new rules reminding you all that we don't want to be the He Man Woman Hater's Club. This represents enough of a departure from pretty much how every other large internet community operates that I figure an announcement is necessary."

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Meatspace: friendly, open chat that uses GIF-loops from your webcam instead of emoticons


Noah Swartz writes, "We live in what is now being hailed as the social media age. Every news article, blog post, or landing page is replete with links to various networks like Twitter or Facebook. More often than not these networks serve to wrap us in our own bubbles, rather than really giving us an experience akin to socializing in person via the Internet."

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Google Images hacked


Google's Image Search has apparently been hacked. All queries return a line or two of normal images, followed by thousands of differently-sized versions of the image above, depicting a grisly car-crash ganked from a Ukrainian news site's coverage of the wreck.

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Taking an active role in our kids' digital lives

Sarah Granger offers some important, clear and commonsense advice for protecting your kids online by teaching them to use the net wisely and welcome all it has to give — not by scaring them into furtive, disastrous Internet experimentation.

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Crowdfunded news-site uncovers ISIS training camp using online mapping tools


Bellingcat kickstarted £51K to do data-driven/crowdsourced citizen journalism earlier this month, and a week later, pinpointed the exact location of an ISIS training camp near Mosul by matching the jihadis' social media posts to online maps and geo-location services.

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Newspapers are, pretty much, dead.


Clay Shirky has some some truths: "Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide 'Click to buy' is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really."

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How the US government exerts control over ICANN


Michael Geist sez, "The debate over Internet governance for much of the past decade has often come down to a battle between ICANN and the ITU (a UN body), which in turn is characterized as a choice between a private-sector led, bottoms-up, consensus model (ICANN) or a governmental-controlled approach. The reality has always been far more complicated. The U.S. still maintains contractual control over ICANN, while all governments exert considerable power within the ICANN model through the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC)."

While the GAC claims its role is merely to provide 'advice' to ICANN, it often seems to take the view that its suggestions can't be refused. Indeed, late on Friday, ICANN proposed a by-law change that would grant governments even greater control over its decision-making process. At the moment, ICANN looks to various supporting organizations to develop policies designed to represent the views of many different stakeholders, including the GAC. Where the GAC and the ICANN board disagree on a policy issue, the ICANN board decision governs provided that a simple majority of board members vote against the GAC advice and that ICANN provide an explanation for the decision.

ICANN is now proposing that the threshold be increased so that 2/3 of eligible ICANN board members would be required to vote against GAC advice in order to reject it. The increased threshold would grant governments enormous power over ICANN, coming close to an effective veto over decisions based on broad consultations and participation from around the world. With the GAC intervening with increasing frequency (particularly on new generic TLD issues), ICANN has maintained that it is not required to follow the governmental advice. That is technically true, but the proposed by-law chance would make it exceptionally difficult to overcome government demands. In effect, governments would be given near-complete veto power over ICANN board decisions.

Government Control Over Internet Governance: Proposal Would Give the GAC Increased Power over ICANN Board Decisions [Michael Geist]

Crowdfunding Lantern, a P2P anti-censorship tool


Scout writes, "Billions of people experience a severely-censored version of the Internet -- most famously in countries like China and Iran. Now there's something you can do about it."

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Microsoft wants to rename Internet Explorer to shed negative associations

Turd-polishing at its finest. What do you think they should call it?

Paranoid Paul: get notified of silent, sneaky terms of service updates


Paul writes, "I've created a free service called ParanoidPaul that notifies you when updates are made to the terms that affect you. I strongly believe that the websites we use every day should be accountable to their users, and transparent about changes made to their privacy policies and terms of services."

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Profile of Flickr and Slack founder Stewart Butterfield


The long and affectionate piece from Wired's Mat Honan details Butterfield's pattern of founding unsuccessful whimsical games companies (Game Neverending, Glitch) that spawn innovative, beautifully functional tech startups (Flickr, Slack).

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NZ TV won't air ads for geo-unblocking ISP

Callum writes, "A New Zealand ISP has had its TV ads rejected by multiple NZ TV Networks (there are three in total, bless) citing a possible 'breach of copyright'."

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Brits trust Wikipedia more than the BBC, "serious" newspapers


According to a Yougov poll, 64% of Britons believe Wikipedia tells the truth "a great deal" or "a fair amount."

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Great video explainer: Vint Cerf on ICANN and NTIA

The "father of the Internet" explains why the Congressional posturing and global freakout about the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration stepping back from management of the Internet domain name system is misplaced.

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