Facebook wants to be the attention economy's central banker


Warren Ellis ruminates on the the way that the old idea that the Internet was birthing an "attention economy" has been transformed by Facebook, which has literally monetized attention, charging you money to reach the people who've asked to hear from you. Read the rest

Ad server will respect Do-Not-Track headers


Adzerk, who serves ads for Bittorrent, Stackexchange, Reddit and other high-profile sites, will honor Do-Not-Track messages from readers' browsers, and its ads will not be blocked by the major ad-blocking software. Read the rest

What the Internet looks like when it's not a patent drawing


In contrast to yesterday's post about the way the Internet is depicted in patent drawings, check out these photos of the Internet's secret actual infrastructure. Read the rest

The other ad-blocking ecosystem: blame-ducking


Anil Dash is on fire in his editorial on all the ways that publishers, advertisers, brokers, readers, OS vendors, browser vendors, and users pass the buck when it comes to intrusive ads, ad-blocking, and sustaining ad-supported media. Read the rest

Dooce quits mommyblogging amid toxic pressure from advertisers


As the supply of publishers went up, advertisers gained leverage they could use to insist on more invasive ads and more unethical editorial practices. Read the rest

The shape of the Internet (according to patent drawings)


The stylized art of patent drawings is instantly recognizable. Before the information age, the drawings were drafter's jewelboxes, designed to make the workings of new mechanical inventions legible to other inventors (and patent examiners). Read the rest

How to save online advertising


My latest Guardian column, How to save online advertising, looks at the writing on the wall for ad-blockers and ad-supported publishing, and suggests one way to keep ads viable. Read the rest

Free speech versus "compelled attention"


Yesterday's story about a woman who made her Twitter account private because of harassment from men sparked a lot of discussion about how blocking and free speech interact with each other. Here's my $0.02 on the matter: Read the rest

Bloom County on the heyday of newspaper funnies


The triumphant return of Bloom County is a reminder of the glory days of newspaper funnies, but this weekend's color strip was a hell of a reminder of how far we've come since the newspapers were the home of our daily chuckle. Read the rest

Tell-all free-to-play-game dev's confessions


An anonymous developer for a free-to-play game explains how his company stalked its most prolific players, creating fake sexy-lady Facebook accounts to friend them in order to gain insight into their proclivities so that super-expensive, one-off virtual goods could be made and targeted to them. Read the rest

Tim Wu joins the New York Attorney General's office

Wu, a protege of Larry Lessig who coined the term "Net Neutrality," will be on sabbatical from Columbia Law while he works for the AG: "If I have a life mission, it is to fight bullies" Read the rest

Brewster Kahle for Librarian of Congress!

The Library of Congress is about to get its first new honcho in a generation, and not a day too soon, given that the guy who presided over the past generation's worth of copyright policy in America is a proud technophobe whose favorite technological innovation is the fax machine. Read the rest

Ashley Madison's passwords were badly encrypted, 15 million+ passwords headed for the Web

A flaw in the fraudulent dating site's password hashing means that at least 15 million of its users' passwords are liable to decryption. Read the rest

EFF announces the 2015 Pioneer Award winners

Caspar Bowden, Citizen Lab, Anriette Esterhuysen and the Association for Progressive Communications, and Kathy Sierra will be awarded the EFF's prestigious prize recognizing the leaders who are extending freedom and innovation on the electronic frontier. Read the rest

Ashley Madison commits copyfraud in desperate bid to suppress news of its titanic leak

The company is shotgunning DMCA notices against journalists and others who reproduce even the tiniest fraction of the dump of users who signed up to find partners with whom to cheat on their spouses -- included in the dump are thousands of people who paid $15 to have their data permanently deleted from the service. Read the rest

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