badusb

Florida man convinces Western Union clerk to insert a thumb drive, steals $32K, does it again, gets caught

Vasile Savu is accused of walking into a Western Union in Hollywood, Florida and asking the clerk to print out his flight itinerary, a pretense he used to get the clerk to insert a thumb-drive loaded with malicious software into his computers, which allegedly allowed Savu to steal $32k from the business. Read the rest

A malicious USB cable with its own wifi rig

MG has built a proof-of-concept malicious USB cable with a tiny wifi radio hidden inside of it, able to wirelessly exfilatrate stolen data; he calls it the O. MG, and while the prototype cost him $4k and took 300 hours, he's working with a team on a small production run for other security researchers to play with. (via Four Short Links) Read the rest

A deep dive into the technical feasibility of Bloomberg's controversial "Chinese backdoored servers" story

Last October, Bloomberg published what seemed to be the tech story of the year: a claim that Supermicro, the leading supplier of servers to clients from the Pentagon and Congress to Amazon, Apple and NASA, had been targeted by Chinese spies who'd inserted devastating, virtually undetectable hardware backdoors into their motherboards by subverting a small subcontractor in China. Read the rest

Ships are just giant floating computers, filled with ransomware, BadUSB, and worms

A coalition of shipping industry associations has published The Guidelines on Cyber Security Onboard Ships, laying out best practices for the giant ships that ply the seas, and revealing that these behemoths are routinely infected with worms, ransomware, and malware spread by infected USB devices. Read the rest

How many computers are in your computer?

Gwern Branwen asks the deceptively simple question "How many computers are in your computer?" Read the rest

Watch neural networks see only what they've been trained to see

Memo Akten created Gloomy Sunday, part of his Learning To See series in which he juxtaposes mundane video with how deep-trained neural networks percieve the same input. Read the rest

Cool visual processing experiment with particles

Justin Lincoln creates lots of interesting little tidbits of visual ideas, like this particle capture experiment that is kind of unsettling. Read the rest

Modechai Guri: the guy who gets data out of airgapped computers

Computers that are isolated from the internet and local networks are said to be "airgapped," and it's considered a best practice for securing extremely sensitive systems. Read the rest

Programmer/artist creates algorithmic portraits composed of a single line

LinesLab is "an experimental design studio established by Sergej Stoppel that explores algorithmic art and robotics." Among his cool works are these single-line portraits. Read the rest

Self-destructing thumb drives with smoke loads, glowing elements, tiny explosives

MG's Mr Self Destruct project takes the USB Killer to new levels, combining a $1.50 system-on-a-chip with a variety of payloads: smoke bombs, "sound grenades," and little explosives, cleverly choreographed with keystroke emulation, allowing the poisoned drive to first cause the connected computer to foreground a browser and load a web-page that plays an appropriate animation (a jack-in-the-box that plays "Pop Goes the Weasel" with the drive's explosive detonating for the climax). Read the rest

Teardown of a consumer voice/location cellular spying device that fits in the tip of a USB cable

Mich from ha.cking bought a $25 "S8 data line locator" device -- a cellular spying tool, disguised as a USB cable and marketed to the general public -- and did a teardown of the gadget, offering a glimpse into the world of "trickle down surveillance" where the kinds of surveillance tools used by the NSA are turned into products and sold to randos over the internet for $25. Read the rest

Opsec for a world where the laptop ban goes global

If the Trump administration makes good on its promise to pack all potentially explosive laptops together in a blast-multiplying steel case in the plane's hold, it will be good news for would-be bombers -- and bad news for your data security. Read the rest

USG: an open source anti-BadUSB hardware firewall for your USB port

BadUSB is bad news: malware that targets the firmware in your USB port's embedded system, bypassing the OS, antivirus software and other countermeasures. Read the rest

Photochrome: keyword-generated impressionistic color palettes

Photochrome is a nifty algorithm that generates a color palette based on a keyword you enter. It compiles all images in their database tagged with your keyword and averages the results into RGB and hex values. Read the rest

The $56 USB Killer is an electrified USB stick that will fry a laptop

For €49.95, you can own a "USB Killer" that "instantly and permanently disables unprotected hardware" with a 200V DC shock. The €13.95 USB KILLER TESTER is a shield that blocks the killer from actually delivering its voltage to your machine (buy the tester, get the killer for half price). (via Schneier) Read the rest

WATCH: More DeepDream obsessions

Since Cory posted about the Deep Dream image recognition algorithm last month (and Rob earlier today) it's inspired an explosion of iterations like Roelof Pieters' DeepDreamed Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas. Read the rest

Fixing the unfixable USB bug

Security experts have been haunted by the prospect of unpatchable, potent, fundamental bug in USB devices; the tension only heightened when sourcecode for an exploit went live last week. Read the rest

Next page

:)