• Budfoot, starring psychedelic fantasy artist Skinner, delivers 420 cult movie excellence.

    For all of us sheltering in place, the claustrophobic cluttered workshop that serves as the sole location in Budfoot — a film where one eccentric man quickly loses his biscuits — may feel all-too relatable. Meet Joe Carver, an indie toy designer whose penchant for manufacturing toys using sketchy chemicals unleashes the latest character in the killer doll genre of horror, Budfoot.

    A spiritual heir to the cursed figure from Trilogy of Terror, watch as Budfoot transforms from mild-mannered cannabis mascot to Exacto knife-wielding menace who turns on his creator. The psychedelic stop motion is reminiscent of the late, great, Bruce Bickford if Bruce had ever had a budget, that is. The slick production value of the VFX are just as impressive as they are revolting.

    Pair Budfoot with Cheech and Chong's "Next Movie" for a midnight movie experience at home tonight.

    Starring Skinner and Henry Zebrowski (Last Podcast on the Left). Directed by Tim Reis and James Sizemore. Special Effects by Shane Morton & VFX by Derek King.

  • Paul Bunyan and other fiberglass advertising giants ride again at Bell Plastics in Hayward California

    Before we had several tiny screens to entertain us on road trips, we were confined to but one: the window. Imagine being stuffed into the back seat of your mom's gold Plymouth Duster, rolling through endless miles of dust, fields, and mountains, your eyes feeding your brain a never-ending litany of "tree….tree…cow….tree….rock…rock…tree…" and then, "…Paul BUNYAN??"

    Beginning in the early '60s, a brethren of Colossus began to fan out across the American countryside. These 14-to-25 foot tall fiberglass giants stood sentry outside tire shops and cafes, designed to act as a homing device for the family station wagon. Though they were known collectively as "Muffler Men," they also took the form of Paul Bunyan, space men, pirates, cowboys, bikini babes, an Alfred E. Neuman look-a-like, even a chicken or two. A company called International Fiberglass in Venice Beach, CA produced about a thousand of these advertising giants during their heyday, transforming small roadside businesses into landmarks worthy of an ogle.

    The proliferation of freeways and uptight city zoning laws contributed to the decline of Muffler Men. All of the original molds were destroyed when International Fiberglass closed in 1976. Though a few can still be spotted in the wild, many now belong under the stewardship of private collectors.

    One such collector, the Bay Area's Bell Plastics, is refuge to what is perhaps the world's largest conglomeration of original muffler men. Once a year, they invite the public into their warehouse for a unique opportunity to wander amongst various advertising giants, including the rare Uniroyal Girl (a bikini-clad female "Muffler Man" who is said to be modeled after Jackie Kennedy), two of San Francisco's beloved Doggie Diner heads, a slightly demented Santa, a pair of industrious car washing octopi, and other oversized company shills. What makes this event even more special is that Bell Plastics has reconstructed the goliath molds using the original figures and now Big Mike threatens to roam the earth once more.

    This year, they their machines up and running at the event so the curious could see how blow mold figures are made.

    To attend next year's open house, visit Bell Plastics Facebook page.

    Kai Wada Roath

    Janelle Hessig

    Janelle Hessig

    Janelle Hessig

    Janelle Hessig

    Janelle Hessig

    Top Image: Kai Wada Roath