Former Attorney General: FBI Director "made a serious mistake"

Last week, FBI director James Comey released a vague letter saying the FBI was investigating more emails that had something to do with Hillary Clinton's personal server. The media largely ran with the GOP characterization of this as reopened investigation into Clinton herself, but things soon got muddy and even conservative commentators found the situation deeply unsettling.

For starters, the emails were on disgraced politician Anthony Weiner's computer, impounded in his teen sext case, meaning Clinton's authorship or receipt of the emails is anyone's guess. Worse, it soon became clear the FBI had failed to get a warrant to read the emails before Comey's announcement, giving the impression of an attempt to tip the election, or of appeasement to political pressures. Eric Holder, U.S. Attorney General until last year, writes that Comey's made a "serious mistake." Read the rest

Today, Congress finally showed it's willing to fight the FBI on encryption

It took a while, but FBI director Jim Comey got a little bit of the grilling he has earned in the FBI vs. Apple case. Freedom of the Press Foundation's Trevor Timm writes on today's House Judiciary Committee hearings on Capitol Hill, at which both the government and the Cupertino tech giant were represented. Read the rest

Apple-FBI crypto hearing was surprisingly hostile to FBI Director James Comey

The House Judiciary committee hearing today titled, “The Encryption Tightrope: Balancing Americans’ Security and Privacy” ended up being full of drama, and riveting moments of confrontation--along with a cavalcade of inept analogies for encryption and hardware security. Read the rest

FBI tells tech companies offering encryption to reconsider “their business model”

Despite zero indication the people responsible for recent terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino used encryption, the FBI is launching an all-out PR war on crypto.

Now, FBI director James Comey is making tech firms that offer end-to-end encryption tools an offer they can't refuse: they should reconsider “their business model,” he said today, and instead adopt encryption techniques that let them intercept communications, and hand them over to law enforcement when asked. Read the rest