Brain Rot: Hip Hop Family Tree, Kool Herc Is Out, Grandmaster Flash Is In

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12 Responses to “Brain Rot: Hip Hop Family Tree, Kool Herc Is Out, Grandmaster Flash Is In”

  1. gwailo_joe says:

    I’m enjoying this semi-regular viral cultural propagation quite a bit….can’t wait for part IV

  2. Sam Ley says:

    Loving the series, Ed! I just started “The Big Payback: The History of the Business of Hip-Hop”, which is really incredible. It is 600 pages thick, exhaustively researched, and a great read.

    Your comics fill the same desire, but I’m loving the illustration style and the feeling you give to all the DJs and MCs – stylized but clearly identifiable. Make sure you put this in a book when you are done! I’ll buy it.

  3. joeposts says:

    I’m not a regular hip-hop listener but I am loving this edu-tainment.

  4. Halloween Jack says:

    Not to be confused with the other Kid Creole, also from the Bronx. 

  5. coryf says:

    Keep up the good work!

  6. Josh Bisker says:

    This is so unbelievably cool. I’m so excited for the next however many installments — I hope your goal is a thick bound book, because that bidness will sell like hotcakes!

  7. wizardru says:

    This is great, great stuff.

  8. wrecksdart says:

    I echo what Sam Ley already said–press the record so we can buy it already.

  9. terry childers says:

    yeah i have to say that this would be awesome as a collected work, possibly with an “old school” mixtape(downloadable, of course).

  10. Al Corrupt says:

    This is gold. 
    Don’t stop.

  11. Mister44 says:

    Pretty cool. I second Mr. Childers idea. Even just a list of the quintessential songs of each artists so we can do search them out. Like I said, this was before my time, and while I recognize some of the names, I am still unfamiliar with their work. The old Scud comics used to have a list of songs to be played at certain sections of the comic.

  12. I seriously enjoy and love this.  I am reading “The Big Payback:The History of the Business of Hip-Hop” and “Luminary Icon” by MC Sha-Rock right now.  This other angle expressed by Ed Piskor, in such a creative way, really helps one understand the true beginnings of hip-hop culture.  It’s also a great way to preserve this street culture, which is what I try to do everyday in my work.

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