Tell Me Something I Don't Know 009: John Porcellino

This is episode 9 of Boing Boing's Tell Me Something I Don't Know podcast. It's an interview show featuring artists, writers, filmmakers, and other creative people discussing their work, ideas, and the reality/business side of how they do what they do.

John Porcellino is the creator of the long-running, self-published mini-comic series, King Cat Comics (celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2014). His books include Perfect Example (Highwater Books, Drawn and Quarterly), Diary of a Mosquito Abatement Man (La Mano), King-Cat Classix (Drawn and Quarterly), Map of My Heart (Drawn and Quaterly), and Thoreau at Walden (Hyperion). His work is characterized by a thoughtful, minimal drawing/writing style and a unique approach to narrative interpretation and temporal representation. Besides his influential work as a cartoonist, Porcellino is the founder of Spit and a Half – a small press comics and zine distribution company that began in the early 90s.

Tell Me Something I Don't Know is produced and hosted by three talented cartoonists and illustrators:

Jim Rugg, a Pittsburgh-based comic book artist, graphic designer, zinemaker, and writer best known for Afrodisiac, The Plain Janes, and Street Angel. His latest project is SUPERMAG.

Jasen Lex is a designer and illustrator from Pittsburgh. He is currently working on a graphic novel called Washington Unbound. All of his art and comics can be found at jasenlex.com.

Ed Piskor is the cartoonist who drew the comic, Wizzywig, and draws the Brain Rot/ Hip Hop Family Tree comic strip at this very site, soon to be collected by Fantagraphics Books and available for pre-order now.

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      1.  Nope, just went with the picture, was turned off by that. Should they somehow not marginalize people working hard for a living in a difficult environment, I’d be happy.

        1. Hi Chuck, I usually don’t respond to comments, but I felt obliged to point out that that’s a self-portrait I drew of myself working hard in a difficult environment.  I’m the last person to want to minimize the efforts of working class people.  Thanks for pointing out, though, that that marginalization exists.

          1.  Thank you very much. I am admittedly hyper sensitive to labor issues and just saw the image and that was my impression and reaction. I am really glad to hear your substance is different than my first impression.

            For what it is worth, I dig the illustration style.

  1. John (hope you are still reading the comments), what’s the name of the Japanese printmaker you  mentioned?

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