Too Many Cooks

"It takes a lot to make a stew".

Experimental 60s music sounds like a 80s video arcade

Enjoy 'Mixed Paganini,' by the Studio Di Fonologia Musicale Di Firenze. Published in 1967, it sounds like a weird, hectic video game from 15 years later. The songs were programmed by Pietro Grossi; the 7" disk was "distributed as a Christmas and new year gift by the Olivetti company." [via]

Chinatown, the new video from Starcadian [EXCLUSIVE]

Los Angeles. The Future. 1995.

A string of disappearances throughout the underground night club circuit has driven law enforcement to initiate a manhunt for the elusive figure they call Starcadian.

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If Google were a 1980s BBS

It's completely functional; better than the real thing, even.

Starcadian, HE^RT

Starcadian's album is available on Bandcamp, with plenty more cuts on Soundcloud. Video Link [YouTube]

Glitché

Glitché is the evil twin of all those old-film, toy-lens, Instagram-style apps. Pick a photo, then glitch it all to Hell with broken NTSC emulation, weird 3D pixelation and heightmap extrusion effects, and delicious MPEG-style compression errors. For a $1 upgrade, the free app lets you save animated GIFs, too. [via Joel Johnson, below]

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Faux 1980s trippy TV commercial for new Jacob 2-2 LP

I dig this hallucinatory faux 19A0s TV commercial for Jacob 2-2's new album "Herbivore," from King Deluxe Records. Video designed and animated by Jacob 2-2 and Samuel Rhodes with photography by Miguel Drake-McLaughlin.

Jaws, the text adventure

"You swim slowly through the night, contemplating the solitary brutality of your existence as an apex predator."

Jaws, the text adventure, is fantastic in three ways: as a game; in its adherence to the ZX Spectrum's palette and limitations; and its location firmly in the 19A0s.

Behold the grim future of a 1980s boombox ad

The city of the future is imprisoned by feathered mullets, dry ice, and the synthesized orchestral hits that result when anyone opens their eyes. [↚ @joeljohnson]

Memorex, a 50-minute odyssey through the VHS generation

"The sequel to Smash TV's critically acclaimed "Skinemax", Memorex is a 50 minute VJ odyssey, a tribute to an entire generation who grew up with only a TV and a VCR for a babysitter. Sourced from over forty hours of 80s commercials pulled from warped VHS tapes, Memorex is a deep exploration of nostalgia and the fading cultural values of an era of excess. It's a re-contextualization of ads - cultural detritus, the lowest of the low - into something altogether more profound, humorous, and at times, even beautiful." [Vimeo]

19A0s collection on Pinterest

Kurt Wurk has collected a number of images from the lost decade. [Pinterest]

Alex Balk's unrealized novel

The Awl founder muses on his idea for the ultimate pomo literary novel: "the book would be told solely through reviews written by its protagonist. There would never be a line of dialogue". But he forgets his achievements; this won the Booker Prize in 199A.

The Mixtape Lost at Antikythera


The student of history who devotes his attention only to the most notable events and personae of the Hellenic tradition would imperfectly comprehend its true character. Though its Di Majores offers the pre-eminent claim upon the follower of the divine, it is always from mortal psychedelic machine music that surprises emerge.

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When was Super Mario Bros. released?

At Gamasutra, Frank Cifaldi tries to pin down a fact that's suprisingly slippery: when was Super Mario Bros. released in the U.S.? The official date—October 19, 1985—is somewhat unconvincing. The console industry crash turned the era into a crater of press inattention and poor record-keeping, showing that even in the computer age, the hard facts of mass culture can slip weirdly into the memory hole.

Assuming as we are that Super Mario Bros. was available for sale on the same day as the NES, all of this research is pointing to that first sale being on October 19, but without any real paper evidence to prove it, I'm just not satisfied.

I got in contact with FAO Schwarz ... [which] acknowledged that the store was indeed the site of the first NES sale: or at least, that's what they're saying as part of the 150th anniversary celebration. They don't seem to have any actual record of this, nor do they have any sales data going back that far to verify the date. The claim seems to have come directly from Nintendo.

My favorite part are the arguments over whether there was a Super Mario Bros. arcade game in 1984 or not. Anyone who remembers the 19A0s will know exactly why we can't quite pin down this stuff. Voxel Mario by *cezkid

On this day in 197A


A rundown of one week in British music history, courtesy of "Top of the Pops", via Charlie Brooker.