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Man claims GoDaddy canceled domains after transfer unlock

Asif Ali is the latest to find fault with shifty domain registrar GoDaddy.

Me: “Why did you release a domain that belonged to me..the registration was still active. And two days before the domain expired, I renewed the .co domain at $30 for a year”.
Agent: “Since the domain was close to expiry so we released it”.

Read the rest

How to transfer your domain name

GoDaddy may have dropped its support for SOPA, but Jason Kottke points out that there are many other reasons to give it a wide berth. At Macworld, Glenn Fleishman (previously) posts a fat guide to the technical ins and outs of transferring domains, with special attention given to getting them out of one particular registrar. Do the shame walk while it's hot! Rob

Who needs SOPA when it takes a year to recover mistakenly seized domains?

The government's website seizure program is already a mess, with one judge refusing to play along and the authorities forced to relinquish a domain in another case. Ars Technica's, Timothy B. Lee asks "Does the government really have the power to seize a domain name, hold it for a year, and then return it without compensating the owner?" Spoiler: yes. Rob

The case of the stolen domain names

Numerous web design advice sites report that their domain names were mysteriously transferred from GoDaddy to another registrar. Though now registered in someone else's name, the DNS records and websites themselves have generally not been interfered with, suggesting a more cunning plan than usual. At fault seem to be poor account passwords, email-based transfer verifications, the GoDaddyness of GoDaddy, and PlanetDomain's indifference to complaints until sites go offline. Rob

Help plucky UK environmentalists defend themselves from ginormous US corporate bully

Jim from the Open Rights Group sez, "We are asking people to donate a few quid or dollars to help http://eco-labs.org, a small artist environmental NGO, defend their use of their domain from a spurious claim from http://www.ecolab.com the multi-billion dollar cleaning business. These plucky Brits are willing do defend their use, which is not confusing and was used prior to the registration of the UK trademark, but need about £800 ($1300) to defend themselves at .org - please help!"

Righthaven copyright troll loses domain

Righthaven is the copyright trolling outfit created by the Las Vegas Review Journal to blackmail alleged newspaper copyright infringers with baseless threats of domain seizure and huge cash judgements. When they created righthaven.com as a home for information related to their indiscriminate bulk-litigation campaign, they neglected to supply the registration information required of them, and it appears that they declined to provide the info when requested to do so by their registrar, GoDaddy. So GoDaddy's taken away their domain:
Now it appears that GoDaddy, the domain registrar for the domain Righthaven.com, has taken down their domain for an invalid whois. According to ICANN rules domain owners are required to maintain valid whois information. Anyone can report an invalid whois record via the WDPRS system, which then passes on the complaint to the sponsoring registrar of the domain. The registrar would then attempt to contact the domain owner and ask them to verify/update their contact information. Should they not do so, the domain can be suspended or even deleted.
RightHaven.com Taken Down for Invalid Whois (Thanks, Clifton!)