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Gweek 108: Adventure Time with Martin & Olivia Olson


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Martin Olson and his daughter Olivia Olson do so many cool things that it’s hard to know where to start. Martin is the head writer for the fantastic Disney animated series Phineas and Ferb. Not only has he written for every episode of the show, he’s also written over 200 songs for the series.

Martin’s 21-year-old daughter Olivia, plays the character Vanessa Doofenshmirtz on Phineas and Ferb, and she plays Marceline the Vampire Queen on Cartoon Network's animated series Adventure Time!, a cartoon my daughter Jane and I are obsessed with. Olivia sings on both series. (Here's Olivia singing “All I want for Christmas” in the movie Love Actually when she was 11).

Martin is the author of two terrific books, which I’ve reviewed on Boing Boing: The Encyclopaedia of Hell (published by Feral House) and The Adventure Time Encyclopaedia, which he writes as the character he plays in the series, Hunson Abadeer, aka the Lord of Evil, who coincidentally happens to be Marceline’s father..

Olivia has a new EP of her music out, called Beauty Is Chaos, and she and her father just put out a full-length CD of songs called The Father Daughter Album of Unspeakable Beauty.

Martin and Olivia came over to my house for the interview, and Jane joined us for the discussion.

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Gweek 107: Adrian Tomine and Rob Walker


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Guests:

Adrian Tomine is a cartoonist whose books include Shortcomings, Summer Blonde, and his ongoing comic book series Optic Nerve. He’s also a regular contributor to The New Yorker, and the first ten years of his work for that magazine was recently collected in the book New York Drawings.


Rob Walker is a technology and culture columnist for Yahoo News, a regular contributor to Design Observer, and he just started a new “watercooler therapy” advice column called The Workologist for the New York Times Sunday business section. His latest book is called Significant Objects: 100 Extraordinary Stories About Ordinary Things, co-edited with Joshua Glenn.


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Click this to see what we talked about...

Gweek 106: You Are Now Less Dumb


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Guests:

David McRaney creator of the the blog You Are Not So Smart, where he writes about the psychology of self-delusion. He also hosts the podcast of the same name and is the author of the book based on the blog, You Are Not So Smart, and the sequel, You Are Now Less Dumb, which was released July 30.


Dean Putney, Boing Boing's coding and development wizard.


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Show notes:

David's books about the psychology of self-delusion: You Are Not So Smart, and You Are Now Less Dumb.


Read the rest

Gweek 105: Gareth Branwyn and Jim McCann


This week's episode of Gweek is sponsored by Rickshaw Bagworks, manufacturers of San Francisco-made messenger bags, backpacks, and laptop sleeves. Use the discount code boingboing for 15% off an entire order through August 15th.

Joining me in this episode:

Gareth Branwyn writes on art, technology and culture. He is the former Editorial Director of MAKE and has been an editor at Mondo 2000, Wired, and bOING bOING (print). He has written seven books, including Jamming the Media, co-authoring Boing Boing's Happy Mutant Handbook, and Jargon Watch. He is currently putting together a collection of his best work, called Borg Like Me (& Other Tales of Art, Eros, and Embedded Systems).

Jim McCann is an award-winning playwright and comic book writer. He is the writer & co-creator of Return of the Dapper Men, which garnered 5 Eisner nominations and won the Eisner for Best Graphic Novel. This award-winning team has reunited to launch Lost Vegas from Image in March 2013, a universe filled with intrigue as one gambler-turned-slave has 24 hours to go all in and pull off the greatest heist the universe has seen. In 2012 McCann launched Mind the Gap, an ongoing paranormal thriller/mystery series from Image. McCann has also written the following titles: New Avengers: The Reunion; Hawkeye & Mockingbird: Ghosts; Widowmaker; Hawkeye: Blindspot; and Marvel Zombies Christmas Carol. He writes in Los Angeles and believes Mac & Cheese should be at the top of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

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Mind the Gap, written by Jim McCann. Volume 2 (issues 6-10) is out now.


Borg Like Me (& Other Tales of Art, Eros, and Embedded Systems), Gareth's Kickstarter project.
See more show notes!

Gweek 104: Andy Ihnatko and Joshua Glenn


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Joining me in this episode:

Andy Ihnatko, technology journalist for the Chicago Sun-Times, and host of The Ihnatko Almanac, a weekly discussion that mostly focuses on the Clickable Arts: the movies, music, books, comics, articles, and other bits of entertainment and news.


Joshua Glenn is a Boston-based writer, publisher, and semiotician. He is co-author of Significant Objects, published by Fantagraphics, and Unbored, the kids' field guide to serious fun coming from Bloomsbury this fall. He edits the website HiLobrow, which as HiLoBooks is now publishing classics -- by Jack London, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, and others -- from what he calls science fiction's Radium Age.

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Here's what we talked about in this episode

Gweek 103: Last Policeman author Ben Winters and Josh Glenn


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Joining me in this episode:

Ben H. Winters is the author of six novels, including The Last Policeman, an Amazon.com Best Book and a 2012 Edgar Award winner. His other books include Bedbugs, Android Karenina, the New York Times bestseller Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters, and the middle-grade novels The Mystery of the Missing Everything and The Secret Life of Ms. Finkleman, a Bank Street Best Book of 2011 and an Edgar Award nominee. Ben is also the author of many plays and musicals for children and adults, and he has written for national and local publications including the Chicago Tribune, Slate, and the Huffington Post. His second book in The Last Policeman trilogy is called Countdown City and it came out July 16.


Joshua Glenn is a Boston-based writer, publisher, and semiotician. He is co-author of Significant Objects, published by Fantagraphics, and Unbored, the kids' field guide to serious fun coming from Bloomsbury this fall. He edits the website HiLobrow, which as HiLoBooks is now publishing classics -- by Jack London, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, and others -- from what he calls science fiction's Radium Age.


Here's what we talked about in this episode

Gweek 102: Peter Bebergal and Dean Putney


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Joining me in this episode:

Peter Bebergal, the author of Too Much to Dream: A Psychedelic American Boyhood and writes frequently on the speculative and slightly fringe. He is currently writing Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock ‘n’ Roll to be published by Tarcher/Penguin. He blogs at mysterytheater.blogspot.com.


Dean Putney, Boing Boing’s coding and development wizard.


Here's what we talked about:

Soldier of the Mist by Gene Wolfe


Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats


FF by Mike Allred


OSR (Old School Renaissance) RPG games:


Candy Box and A Dark Room. New types of games popping up: minimalist in-browser text adventure/RPG hybrids


Dean’s text adventure on Omegle


Robot Film Festival.


The Ononeon

Satechi Bluetooth speaker


Metzger’s Dog, by Thomas Perry


Skooba Laptop Weekender duffle bag


The New Way Things Work


Memrise


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Gweek 101: Mark Dery, cultural critic


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In this episode, I talked to Mark Dery, a cultural critic and frequent contributor to Boing Boing. Mark's books include The Pyrotechnic Insanitarium: American Culture on the Brink and Escape Velocity: Cyberculture at the End of the Century. His latest book is the essay collection I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts: Drive-by Essays on American Dread, American Dreams. Recently, Boing Boing debuted its publishing imprint, Boing Boing books, with Dery’s longform essay for Kindle, All the Young Dudes: Why Glam Rock Matters. He is at work on a biography of the author, illustrator, and legendary eccentric Edward Gorey (Little, Brown: 2014). Follow @markdery.

Here's how Mark Dery described the podcast to followers of his blog, Shovelware:

Zaniest. conversation. EVER. Mark Frauenfelder, the Dick Cavett of Nonlinear Talk and host of the Boing Boing podcast GWEEK, engaged me in the most deliriously free-associated, brain-ticklingly delightful interview I’ve ever conducted.

Keywords (for the time-starved): Bunuel’s recipe for the Platonic ideal of the martini, Norman Rockwell’s dark side, the horror of Disneyland caricaturists, Being Californian, and, of course, my Boing Boing e-single on Bowie, glam, gender, and masculinity. A hot-stone massage for the mind.

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Gweek 100: A.J. Jacobs, extreme self-experimenter


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In this episode, I talked to A.J. Jacobs, the author of some of my favorite books. In his 2005 book, The Know-It-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World, A.J. committed himself to read the entire print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. In 2007 he wrote The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible, he lived by the rules of the Bible, and ended up wearing a white robe and a very full beard. And in Drop Dead Healthy: One Man's Humble Quest for Bodily Perfection, A.J. followed a bunch of extreme self-improvement techniques, including a raw food diet, the paleo diet, libido boosting techniques, and unusual exercise regimens.


Here's what we talked about:

A.J.'s new advice column for Esquire. "I post a quandary from a reader on my Facebook page, and then my 100,000 followers weigh in with advice, rants, wisdom, encouragement, condemnations, etc. Then I curate the best/most interesting/funniest advice and put it in a column, along with my own take on the topic. So it's like a stadium-full of Ann Landerses and Dan Savages."


A.J.'s latest article for Esquire. "It was called The Overly Documented Life, and it was about the delights and hazards of video-recording your life 24 hours a day for three months. It’s a peek at what life will be like in the Google Glass era. When I had an argument with my wife, and she said, 'You never told me that!' I could say, 'Well, let’s go to the videotape.'"


My other advice column for mental_floss, Modern Problems. This one is about putting your problems in perspective. Modern life is filled with annoyances and hurt, but compared to yesteryear, most of us live in earthly paradise. Nostalgia can suck it. The past was A mind-bogglingly dirty, painful, fetid, smelly, sickly and boring place. So if my reader complains about the dentist, I very gently tell him/her about what it was like to go to the dentist in the 1700s.


Update on A.J.'s treadmill desking and other health habits from Drop Dead Healthy.


Mark's experience using a $100 Samsung Galaxy Pocket and a local SIM card when he went to Japan instead of buying AT&T's expensive international data plan.


And a whole lot more!

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Gweek 099: John Hodgman: RAGNAROK Netflix Special

John Hodgman's comedy special John Hodgman: Ragnarok, debuted today on Netflix. Carla and I were given early access to the special, which we watched and enjoyed very much. John kindly spent his lunch hour on the set of The Daily Show yesterday to talk with me about the special.

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Gweek 098: Win Hugh Howey's Paperwhite Kindle!

An interview with WOOL author Hugh Howey


This episode of Gweek is brought to you by 23andMe, the leading health and ancestry DNA service. Order your 23andMe DNA kit today for just $99.

This time, I talked to:

Hugh Howey, the author of the award-winning Molly Fyde Saga and the New York Times bestselling Wool series. The Wool Omnibus won Kindle Book Review's 2012 Indie Book of the Year Award.


Dean Putney, Boing Boing’s development wizard and everyone's favorite Manic Pixie Dream Coder.


Giveaway! Hugh kindly offered to give away a brand new Kindle Paperwhite with his signature on it! To be considered for the giveaway, follow @GweekPodcast on Twitter. We'll pick the winner at random on June 25 at Noon PT.


Here's what we talked about:

Hugh discusses his unique independent publishing model and why he turned down a seven-figure book advance to retain ownership of e-book rights.


Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles.


Exec, Lyft and the informal economy.


7 Minutes Workout Mark: "I checked out six different free iPhone apps based on research into High Intensity Interval Training. The best one is called 7 Minutes Workout."


Kingdom Rush Frontiers Mark: "I loved the the first Kingdom Rush, a tower defense game with nice cartoony graphics. This follow up is great fun, too."


Why Knot?: How to Tie More Than Sixty Ingenious, Useful, Beautiful, Lifesaving, and Secure Knots, by Philippe Petit. Mark: "The Man on Wire guy who illegally walked across the World Trade Center in 1974 has written and illustrated a great book about tying knots."



And a whole lot more!

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Gweek 097: Ramez Naam and Jason Snell



In this episode of Gweek, I talked to Ramez Naam and Jason Snell.

Ramez Naam is a computer scientist and the H.G. Wells Award-winning author of three books, including the sci-fi thriller Nexus.


Jason Snell is editorial director at IDG, the publishers of magazines and web sites about technology such as Macworld, PCWorld, and TechHive. He was the editor of Macworld for eight years. He's also the host of The Incomparable, an award-winning podcast about geeky cultural topics including movies, TV, books, and comics.


Here's what we talked about:

Real-life cyborg tech Ramez: "In the last couple years we’ve seen the approval of the first bionic eye, trials on implants that let paralyzed people move robot arms via their thoughts, and brain implants that make rats and monkeys smarter. What’s going on here? Are we headed towards The Matrix?"


Star Trek Into Darkness Jason: "A lot of complaints I see about this movie (which I really liked) seem to involve fans who are offended by divergences from continuity, or because the movie dares to tread over (and rewrite or subvert) old ground." Ramez: "How much do we expect our sci-fi to be scientifically accurate? Or even self-consistent? I enjoyed Avengers despite it being very silly and at times illogical. But much more minor flaws in logic ruined Prometheus for me."

Feedly Mark: "A replacement for Google reader, which is going away."


Morning Glories Jason: "Just started reading this comic, which just began its second "season." As a big fan of Lost, I'm intrigued by this time-bending combination of Lost and Buffy or Runaways."


Mark: "I'm buying a $100 Samsung Galaxy Pocket and a local SIM card when traveling to Japan instead of buying AT&T's expensive international data plan."


And a whole lot more!

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Gweek 096: Dave Finkel and Kevin Mack

In this episode of Gweek, I talked to Dave Finkel and Kevin Mack.

Kevin Mack is a pioneering digital artist and Academy Award winning visual effects designer. Kevin also uses science and technology to make psychoactive abstract art. His work is currently featured in the "Imagined Realities in New Media" exhibit at the PS Zask Gallery in Southern California.


Dave Finkel is a Los Angeles based TV comedy writer. He’s currently an Executive Producer on the Fox comedy, New Girl starring Zooey Deschanel. His past credits include 30 Rock, United States of Tara and Just Shoot Me!


Here's what we talked about:

Rayman Jungle Run: addictive game for iOS and Android


Inkodye: Amazing sunlight sensitive dyes


Foldify: Fun paper craft iPad app for kids


Melon: Kickstarter for an EEG neurofeedback transmitting headband


Nanoflowers: Beautiful microscopic flower sculptures


Deep Learning: The next stage of neural networks


Cloud Face: Computers seeing faces in clouds


Chris Bathgate: Sculptor


HUMN Wallet: Two flat metal plates with an elastic band around them. Your stuff gets sandwiched between.


Pxlbots: Aggressively grainy pixel art of monsters and robots. Excellent DIY vinyl stickers.


The New Disruptors podcast: Glenn Fleishman's fantastic interview podcast about the end of organizational advantage.


And more!

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Gweek 095: Ruben Bolling and Nate DiMeo

In this episode of Gweek, I talked to Ruben Bolling and Nate DiMeo.

Ruben Bolling is the creator of “Tom the Dancing Bug,” the weekly comic strip that premieres every Wednesday on Boing Boing. “Tom the Dancing Bug” has won many awards and is a multiple Harvey Award nominee for Best Comic Strip. You can join the INNER HIVE, the comic strip’s subscription service.


Nate DiMeo is the creator of the Memory Palace, a podcast and public radio segment. He’s an on again off again journalist and has written for the TV show Parks and Recreation and was a finalist for the Thurber Prize in American Humor for co-writing a companion book for Parks and Rec called Pawnee: the Greatest Town in America.

Here's what we talked about:

Cinebook, a line of European comic books, including Lucky Luke, Yakari, Blue Coats


Marble Season, by Gilbert Hernandez


Waze, a traffic and GPS app


The Books of Beginning series, a middle-grade fantasy adventure trilogy by John Stephens


Super Flat Times, a kinda lost, unheralded, terrific collection of short stories about a bonkers dystopian world by Matthew Derby


The Hunter, by Richard Stark


Wikireader, $20 gadget contains "the entire English Wikipedia with 3 million topics"


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Gweek 094: Director Chris Columbus and writer Ned Vizzini, authors of House of Secrets

In this episode of Gweek, I talked to Ned Vizzini and Chris Columbus about their new book, House of Secrets. Harry Potter creator J. K. Rowling calls House of Secrets “a breakneck, jam-packed, roller-coaster of an adventure about the secret power of books.”

Ned Vizzini is an award-winning author and television writer. He’s the author of the novels Be More Chill and It's Kind of a Funny Story, and he was on Gweek 069 last year when his delightful young adult novel, The Other Normals was published. He’s also written for TV, including MTV’s Teen Wolf.

Chris Columbus is the writer, director, and producer of many award winning movies, including Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Mrs. Doubtfire, The Goonies, Gremlins, The Help, and Home Alone.

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Thanks to Soundcloud for hosting Gweek!

Gweek 093: Crime writer Duane Swierczynski

In this episode of Gweek, I talked to the terrific crime writer Duane Swierczynski. Duane has a new book out today, called Point & Shoot. It's the third and final novel in his Charlie Hardie series (see my review here). Next week, Dark Horse is releasing X #1, written by Duane. We talked about his novels, non-fiction work, and comic book writing (See my review of his comic book series, Bloodshot). We also geeked out on our favorite crime writers, and I added several authors to my list of books I want to read before I die.

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What we talked about in this episode:

Fun & Games


Hell & Gone


Point & Shoot

The Wheel Man


The Blonde


Frauds, Scams, and Cons


Thanks to Soundcloud for hosting Gweek!

Gweek 092: Cartoonist Lucy Knisley

Dean Putney and I interviewed Lucy Knisley, one of my favorite cartoonists. From her website:

Lucy is an illustrator, comic artist and author. Occasionally she is a puppeteer, ukulele player and food/travel writer. She likes books, sewing, bicycles, food you can eat with a spoon, ornery cats, art you can climb on, manatees, nice pens, costumes, baking, television, cheese and Oscar Wilde.

Her first published book, French Milk, is a drawn journal about living (and eating) in Paris with her mother. (From Touchstone Publishing from Simon and Schuster), August of 2008.


Her newest book, Relish, from First Second Books, is about growing up in the food industry. (First Second Books, April 2013.)

Beginning with a love for Archie comics, Tintin and Calvin and Hobbes, she has been making comics in some form or another since she could hold a pencil.

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What we talked about in this episode:

Mailbox


Primates


Pretty Girls Ugly Faces


Record!!


Moves


Candy Crush Saga


Jiro Dreams of Sushi


Thanks to Soundcloud for hosting Gweek!

Gweek 091: Dennis Eichhorn & Real Stuff

Dennis Eichhorn launched the autobiographical comic book, Real Stuff, in 1990. Dennis has had some of the strangest life experiences you can imagine, and he comes across as a person who is adventurous, compassionate, curious, and enjoys laughing at himself. Best of all, he is a terrific storyteller.

Real Stuff is one of my favorite comics of all time, and I have some good news to share. Boing Boing is going to run the amazing stories from the pages of Real Stuff, once a week (Read the first one here). I’m immensely excited that a new audience is going to be able to read Real Stuff on Boing Boing, free of charge. I hope you’ll enjoy reading, or re-reading them.

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Gweek 090: Melissa McEwen, food blogger

I spoke with food blogger and Meatshare founder Melissa McEwen. Her blog, Hunt Gather Love is about "the intersection between evolutionary biology and food."

Melissa is profiled in today's Chicago Reader article about a supper club run by amateur chefs.

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Thanks to Soundcloud for hosting Gweek!

Gweek 089: Marina Gorbis, executive director of Institute for the Future

NewImageEarlier this month, Boing Boing posted an excerpt from Marina Gorbis's fascinating new book, The Nature of the Future: Dispatches from the Socialstructed World. As David wrote, the book is "a compelling, provocative, and grounded book about how technology is enabling individuals to connect with one another to follow their passions and get stuff done, outside of large corporations, governments, and the other institutions that typically rule our lives." David and I spoke with Marina about The Nature of the Future for this edition of GWeek.

When Marina was a child, growing up in the Soviet Union, she lived with her sister and widowed mother, a medical doctor at a government clinic in Odessa. Her mother’s salary was meager, and her mother wasn’t a member of the privileged communist party elite, and yet Marina says she and her sister enjoyed a life filled with the arts, good food, fashionable clothes, travel, and education. It was all possible, she says, because her mother knew the value of social capital. “Social connections,” Marina writes, “were a powerful currency that flowed through [my mother’s] network of friends and acquaintances, giving her access to many goods and services and enabling our comfortable, if not luxurious, lifestyle.”

Marina never forgot this lesson about the incredible power of networked individuals, and it directed the course of her professional life. For the past 7 years, Marina has been the executive director of the Institute for the Future, an independent, non-profit research organization and creative design studio in Palo Alto California where David is also a researcher. IFTF helps organizations think about the future to make better decisions in the present.

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Thanks to Soundcloud for hosting Gweek!

Gweek 088: Nick Harmer of Death Cab for Cutie

David and I had a terrific conversation with Nick Harmer, bass player for Death Cab for Cutie. We talked about the state of home recording, great crime novels, the best places to use the toilet while on tour, and much more.

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Nick provided a list of enjoyable books he's read while on tour:

Nick says: "Pretty much anything by these authors is great reading. Other notable go-to authors for me include: James Ellroy, Elmore Leonard, James Sallis, and Walter Mosley to name a few."

Thanks to Soundcloud for hosting Gweek!

Gweek 087: The Art of Doing

I had an enlightening conversation with Josh Gosfield and Camille Sweeney, authors of a great new book called The Art of Doing: How Superachievers Do What They Do and How They Do It So Well. Josh and Camille interviewed 36 notable people -- artists, entrepreneurs, actors, athletes -- asking them their secrets of success. Joining me on the episode was Gweek's frequent co-host, Joshua Glenn, co-editor of Unbored: The Essential Field Guide to Serious Fun and HiLowBrow.

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In this episode:

The Art of Doing: How Superachievers Do What They Do and How They Do It So Well


Ye-Ye Profile: Gigi Gaston


Fathom Butterfly - the notorious beauty queen, showgirl, Hammer horror actress, porn star, felon and feminist filmmaker tweets her memoirs


Unbored: The Essential Field Guide to Serious Fun, by Elizabeth Foy Larsen and Joshua Glenn.


Katana, by Ann Nocenti and Alex Sanchez


Science-Fiction: The Early Years, by Everett Franklin Bleiler


In Praise of Messy Lives, by Katie Roiphe


Geek Battle: The Game of Extreme Geekdom


Flow Free

Gweek 086: Utopian for Beginners

This was a fun episode! I spoke with John Glassie, author of A Man of Misconceptions, a non-fiction book about the unusual 17th-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher, and Joshua Foer, author of Moonwalking with Einstein, which recounts Joshua’s yearlong quest to improve his memory under the tutelage of top "mental athletes.”

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In this episode:

A Man of Misconceptions: The Life of an Eccentric in an Age of Change, by John Glassie


Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything, by Joshua Foer


Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder: Pronged Ants, Horned Humans, Mice on Toast, and Other Marvels of Jurassic Technology, by Lawrence Weschler


"Utopian for Beginners: An amateur linguist loses control of the language he invented," a New Yorker article by Joshua Foer


"Want to Remember Everything You'll Ever Learn? Surrender to This Algorithm," a Wired article by Gary Wolf


Atlas Obscura is the definitive guide to the world's wondrous and curious places.


Language learning apps and websites: Memrise, iAnki, Dr. Moku's Hiragana Mnemonics, Dr. Moku's Katakana Mnemonics

Gweek 085: Maximum Sugar Rush

(Thanks to SoundCloud for hosting Boing Boing's podcasts!)

Gweek is a podcast where the editors and friends of Boing Boing talk about comic books, science fiction and fantasy, video games, board games, TV shows, music, movies, tools, gadgets, apps, and other neat stuff.

My guests in this episode:

Peter Bebergal (left), the author of Too Much to Dream: A Psychedelic American Boyhood and a writer for various online and print magazines. He blogs at mysterytheater.blogspot.com. Glenn Fleishman (right), executive editor of The Magazine, a periodical for technology-minded readers that isn’t always about technology, the host of the podcast The New Disruptors, and one of the writers of The Economist magazine’s Babbage blog.

Peter talked about the "lack of pop culture for that once powerful consumer: the 10-13 year-old boy." He said, "I spend so much time with my son trying to figure out the appropriateness of media, from TV to movies to video games. There is so little directed to his age (11). everything is either dumbed down or too violent and mature. My son gave me a list of his favorite things this past year." Peter shares his son's list in this episode.

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Other things we talked about:

Maximum Ride novels, about mutant kids who have spy-like adventures.

Justified: It's back and continues to be one of the great network shows.

Sony NEX6: The prospect of a compact camera with most of the characteristics of a DSLR, but at a lower cost and in a more compact form factor. The differences between a smartphone and anything but a DSLR are eroding. Cameraphones have nearly caught up to some of the better point-and-shoots. (And some cameras are becoming phones or running Android.)

PrintrBot Jr., a $400 3D printer.

Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and artist Fiona Staples: the weirdest comic you'll ever read right now for a mainstream audience

Strange Aeons magazine

Wreck-It Ralph Soundtrack

Gweek 084: Carrie Brownstein

This morning David and I spoke with with Carrie Brownstein: musician, writer, actor. She's a founding member of the bands Sleater-Kinney and Wild Flag, and the co-creator, co-writer, and co-star of Portlandia, the hit sketch comedy series on IFC, currently in its 3rd season.


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Previously:

Portlandia: A Guide for Visitors

Portlandia: Artisanal popcorn

Portlandia just keeps getting better

Portlandia holiday preview video: "Vagina Pillows"

SPOILER ALERT: New Portlandia preview clip is called "Spoiler Alert"

(Image of Carrie Brownstein: Wildflag - SXSW Music 2011 - Austin, TX, a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (2.0) image from kk's photostream)

(Thanks, Rachel Maguire!)

Gweek 083: How Schweetz It Is!

In this episode of Gweek I was joined by John Walker of the gaming review site Rock, Paper, Shotgun, and Phillip Gullet of the blog Phil Are Go.

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Here are a few of the things we talked about:


Rum Doings Podcast



Marvel NOW!



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Gweek 082: Mitch O'Connell, the World's Best Artist

In this episode of the Gweek podcast, I interviewed Mitch O'Connell about his massive new art book, Mitch O'Connell the World's Best Artist by Mitch O'Connell. This book shows his early work (he published a great zine when we were in high school together), his attempts to enter mainstream comics ("Interesting, but no cigar" -- Jim Shooter), his commercial art, band posters, gallery paintings, tattoo flash, and more. See sample pages here.


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Gweek 081: Wonderful apps, books, comics, and gear

Gweek is Boing Boing's podcast about comic books, science fiction and fantasy, video games, board games, tools, gadgets, apps, and other neat stuff.

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My co-hosts for this episode:

Joshua Glenn, a Boston-based writer, publisher, and semiotician. He is co-author of Significant Objects, published by Fantagraphics, and Unbored, the kids' field guide to serious fun coming from Bloomsbury this fall. He edits the website HiLobrow, which as HiLoBooks is now publishing classics -- by Jack London, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, and others -- from what he calls science fiction's Radium Age.


Kevin Kelly, senior maverick at Wired, editor of Cool Tools, co-founder of Quantified Self, and author of books.


In this episode, we talked about:

About Love: Three Stories by Anton Chekhov, illustrated by Seth. Three interlinked stories about hunters who are stuck in a hut during a snowstorm. Joshua: "Seth is not only great at illustrating, he's also great at decorating books. It's a beautiful pleasure to hold this book." Seth also illustrated two books that Joshua co-wrote: The Idler's Glossary and The Wage Slave's Glossary.


Vela Quadrant Task Force. A long-running webcomic. Kevin: "The art in it looks like folk art painting. There's a kind of cramped feeling to it. There's an offbeat, slightly skewed sensibility … there's something outsider about it."


Kevin gives us an update on the successful Kickstarter campaign for the second volume in The Silver Cord graphic novel series. Download the first issue for free as a PDF here.


Finish This Book. Joshua: "It's a very neat book kids. The author, Keri Smith, pretends that she's found a bunch of scattered pages in a park that she's assembled. There is a mystery involved, and you have to figure out what this manual was. And in order to do that, you have a bunch of creative exercises on each page."


The People of the Ruins, by Edward Shanks. The fifth book in the Radium Age Science Fiction Series, published by Josh's HiLoBooks. "Trapped in a London laboratory during a worker uprising in 1924, ex-artillery officer and physics instructor Jeremy Tuft awakens 150 years later — in a neo-medieval society whose inhabitants have forgotten how to build or operate machinery."


The Yeti USB Microphone by Blue. Mark: "There are many reasons to use the Yeti microphone for podcasting instead of a USB headset. You can change the directionality with a knob. There's a knob for the game. You can plug headphones into it and get instant monitoring of what your voice sounds like, so you can modulate your voice -- it really helps to keep me from yelling into the microphone."


Reflective Zero Messenger Bag from Rickshaw Bagworks.


And lots more: Lens reversal rings for macro photography, 21 truly great movies for parents and kids to watch together (that you can watch instantly on Netflix), Finding Bigfoot, Waze GPS collaborative navigation app, Banksy Bristol Tour app, Werewolf/Mafia, the parlor game.

Gweek 080: Interview with Anarchy Comics publisher Jay Kinney



In this episode of Gweek I interviewed one of my publishing heroes, Jay Kinney. Jay was a founding member of the underground comics movement in the late 1960s beginning with Bijou Funnies in 1968. In 1970 he launched Young Lust comics, a great parody of the true love comics of 40 through 60s. He was also art director of the rock fanzine, Who Put the Bomp, which launched the careers of music journalists Lester Bangs and Griel Marcus.

He was editor of Co-Evolution Quarterly, the magazine that grew out of the Whole Earth Catalog. When Co-Evolution Quarterly evolved into Whole Earth Review, Jay wrote an article for it in 1987 called, "If Software Companies Ran the Country," in which he likened digital media to the replicating Shmoos in L'il Abner, and the article remains as fresh and powerful today as it did 25 years ago.

Jay was the founder and publisher of the late, great Gnosis Magazine, and more recently the author of several books on Western esoteric and occult traditions, including The Masonic Myth, "a journey of discovery into the real facts (and mysteries) of Masonry's history and symbols."

We also discussed the newly-published anthology of Anarchy Comics, yet another terrific creation by Jay. Though it ran only four issue from 1978 to 1987, the series remains one of my favorites, and I treasure my original copies.


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Gweek 079: Milo Danger, maker of the armed civilian drone

In this special edition of the Gweek podcast I interviewed Milo Danger, the guy who installed a paintball handgun into an unmanned drone and shot cardboard targets shaped like human torsos. Milo has other videos on his Danger Info YouTube channel about lock picking and how to grow medical marijuana.


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