Behind the One-Way Mirror: EFF's "deep dive into corporate surveillance"

EFF's Behind the One-Way Mirror: A Deep Dive Into the Technology of Corporate Surveillance is a long, comprehensive look at corporate tracking, particularly invisible, third-party tracking, as with ad-networks, license-plate readers and facial recognition.

The paper covers different types of identifiers (cookies, fingerprinting, ad IDs on mobile devices), and how ad-tech companies link these; then it shows how these identifiers are used in real-time tracking (in websites, apps, the physical world), and how it's used to build and reinforce corporate power.

The article then explores how data brokers and ad-targeting work together, who they sell to, and how their services work.

Finally, the article delves into different forms of self-defense, from ad- and tracker-blockers to legislative efforts you can support.

First, dominant companies like Google and Facebook can pressure publishers into installing their tracking code. Publishers rely on the world’s biggest social network and the world’s biggest search engine to drive traffic to their own sites. As a result, most publishers need to advertise on those platforms. And in order to track how effective their ads are, they have no choice but to install Google and Facebook’s conversion measurement code on their sites and apps. Google, Facebook, and Amazon also act as third-party ad networks, together controlling over two-thirds of the market. That means publishers who want to monetize their content have a hard time avoiding the big platforms’ ad tracking code.

Second, vertically integrated tech companies can gain control of both sides of the tracking market. Google administers the largest behavioral advertising system in the world, which it powers by collecting data from its Android phones and Chrome browser—the most popular mobile operating system and most popular web browser in the world. Compared to its peer operating systems and browsers, Google’s user software makes it easier for its trackers to collect data.

When the designers of the Web first described browsers, they called them “user agents:” pieces of software that would act on their users’ behalf on the Internet. But when a browser maker is also a company whose main source of revenue is behavioral advertising, the company’s interest in user privacy and control is pitted against the company’s interest in tracking. The company’s bottom line usually comes out on top.

Third, data can be used to profile not just people, but also competitor companies. The biggest data collectors don’t just know how we act, they also know more about the market—and their competitors—than anyone else. Google’s tracking tools monitor over 80% of traffic on the Web, which means it often knows as much about it’s competitors’ traffic as its competitors do (or more). Facebook (via third-party ads, analytics, conversion pixels, social widgets, and formerly its VPN app Onavo) also monitors the use and growth of websites, apps, and publishers large and small. Amazon already hosts a massive portion of the Internet in its Amazon Web Services computing cloud, and it is starting to build its own formidable third-party ad network. These giants use this information to identify nascent competitors, and then buy them out or clone their products before they become significant threats. According to confidential internal documents, Facebook used data about users’ app habits from Onavo, its VPN, to inform its acquisition of WhatsApp.

Fourth, as tech giants concentrate tracking power into their own hands, they can use access to data as an anticompetitive cudgel. Facebook was well aware that access to its APIs (and the detailed private data that entailed) were invaluable to other social companies. It has a documented history of granting or withholding access to user data in order to undermine its competition.

Behind the One-Way Mirror: A Deep Dive Into the Technology of Corporate Surveillance [Bennett Cyphers and Gennie Gebhart/EFF]