A surprising case of classical music plagiarism

When the English concert pianist Joyce Hatto died in 2006, she was remembered as a national treasure for the brilliant playing on her later recordings. But then doubts arose as to whether the performances were really hers. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll review a surprising case of musical plagiarism, which touched off a scandal in the polite world of classical music.

We'll also spot foxes in London and puzzle over a welcome illness.

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For 13 years white geologist Clarence King maintained a second identity as a black man in New York

American geologist Clarence King led a strange double life in the late 1800s: He invented a second identity as a black railroad porter so he could marry the woman he loved, and then spent 13 years living separate lives in both white and black America. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll consider the extraordinary lengths that King went to in order to be with the woman he loved.

We'll also contemplate the dangers of water and puzzle over a policeman's strange behavior.

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Brothers Homer and Langley Collyer filled their Harlem townhouse with 140 tons of junk

In the 1930s, brothers Homer and Langley Collyer withdrew from society and began to fill their Manhattan brownstone with newspapers, furniture, musical instruments, and assorted junk. By 1947, when Homer died, the house was crammed with 140 tons of rubbish, and Langley had gone missing. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll tell the strange, sad story of the Hermits of Harlem.

We'll also buy a bit of Finland and puzzle over a banker's misfortune.

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Diver William Walker spent five years under Winchester Cathedral to restore the building's foundations

In 1905 Winchester Cathedral was in danger of collapsing as its eastern end sank into marshy ground. The surprising solution was to hire a diver, who worked underwater for five years to build a firmer foundation for the medieval structure. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll tell the story of William Walker and his curious contribution to saving a British landmark.

We'll also contemplate a misplaced fire captain and puzzle over a shackled woman.

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In 1958, two pilots managed to stay aloft in a small plane for two months straight

The world's longest airplane flight took place in 1958, when two aircraft mechanics spent 64 days above the southwestern U.S. in a tiny Cessna with no amenities. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll follow the aerial adventures of Bob Timm and John Cook as they set a record that still stands today.

We'll also consider a derelict kitty and puzzle over a movie set's fashion dictates.

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In 1856, 19-year-old Mary Patten commanded a clipper ship around Cape Horn

In 1856, an American clipper ship was approaching Cape Horn when its captain collapsed, leaving his 19-year-old wife to navigate the vessel through one of the deadliest sea passages in the world. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll tell the story of Mary Patten and the harrowing voyage of the Neptune's Car.

We'll also consider some improbable recipes and puzzle over a worker's demise.

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In the early 1800s, an escaped convict spent 32 years living among the aborigines of southeastern Australia

In 1835, settlers in Australia discovered a European man dressed in kangaroo skins -- a convict who had escaped an earlier settlement and spent 32 years living among the natives of southern Victoria. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll review the extraordinary life of William Buckley, the so-called "wild white man" of colonial Australia.

We'll also try to fend off scurvy and puzzle over some colorful letters.

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In World War II, the U.S. Army experimented with firebombs carried by live bats

During World War II, the U.S. Army experimented with a bizarre plan: using live bats to firebomb Japanese cities. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the crazy history of the bat bomb, the extraordinary brainchild of a Pennsylvania dentist.

We'll also consider the malleable nature of mental illness and puzzle over an expensive quiz question.

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In 1906, the Bronx Zoo exhibited a Congolese man in its primate house

The Bronx Zoo unveiled a controversial exhibit in 1906 -- a Congolese man in a cage in the primate house. The display attracted jeering crowds to the park, but for the man himself it was only the latest in a string of indignities. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll review the sad tale of Ota Benga and his life in early 20th-century America.

We'll also delve into fugue states and puzzle over a second interstate speeder.

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'The Children's Blizzard' of 1888 trapped children in schoolhouses across the American Midwest

In January 1888, after a disarming warm spell, a violent storm of blinding snow and bitter cold suddenly struck the American Midwest, trapping farmers in fields, travelers on roads, and hundreds of children in schoolhouses with limited fuel. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the Children's Blizzard, one of the most harrowing winter storms in American history.

We'll also play 20 Questions with a computer and puzzle over some vanishing vultures.

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In 1703 a blond Frenchman convinced much of London that he was from Taiwan

In 1703, London had a strange visitor, a young man who ate raw meat and claimed that he came from an unknown country on the island of Taiwan. Though many doubted him, he was able to answer any question he was asked, and even wrote a best-selling book about his homeland. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll consider the curious question of the man from Formosa.

We'll also scrutinize a stamp forger and puzzle over an elastic Utah.

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Six lateral thinking puzzles

Here are six new lateral thinking puzzles to test your wits and stump your friends -- play along with us as we try to untangle some perplexing situations using yes-or-no questions.

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In 1924, two British mountaineers disappeared trying to conquer Mount Everest. No one knows if they succeeded.

In 1924 two British mountaineers set out to be the first to conquer Mount Everest. But they never returned to camp, and to this day no one knows whether they reached the top. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll review the case of George Mallory and Andrew Irvine, which has been called "one of the greatest unsolved adventure mysteries of the 20th century."

We'll also learn what to do if attacked by a bear and puzzle over the benefits of a water shortage.

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In the 1870s, a French laborer found himself making strange, compulsive journeys all over Europe

In the 1870s, French gas fitter Albert Dadas started making strange, compulsive trips to distant towns, with no planning or awareness of what he was doing. His bizarre affliction set off a 20-year epidemic of "mad travelers" in Europe, which evaporated as mysteriously as it had begun. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll consider the parable of pathological tourism and its meaning for psychiatry.

We'll also contemplate the importance of sick chickens and puzzle over a farmyard contraption.

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The story of a daring 1943 commando raid to stop Germany from getting an atomic bomb

During World War II, the Allies feared that Germany was on the brink of creating an atomic bomb. To prevent this, they launched a dramatic midnight commando raid to destroy a key piece of equipment in the mountains of southern Norway. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll remember Operation Gunnerside, "one of the most daring and important undercover operations of World War II."

We'll also learn what to say when you're invading Britain and puzzle over the life cycle of cicadas.

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Bogus professor Marvin Hewitt taught at seven different schools and universities

Marvin Hewitt never finished high school, but he taught advanced physics, engineering, and mathematics under assumed names at seven different schools and universities between 1945 and 1953. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll trace the curious career of an academic impostor, whose story has been called "one of the strangest academic hoaxes in history."

We'll also try on a flashproof scarf and puzzle over why a healthy man would check into a hospital.

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In the 1930s, two promising young American writers disappeared without a trace

Everett Ruess and Barbara Newhall Follett were born in March 1914 at opposite ends of the U.S. Both followed distinctly unusual lives as they pursued a love of writing. And both disappeared in their 20s, leaving no trace of their whereabouts. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the brief lives of two promising young authors and the mystery that lingers behind them.

We'll also patrol 10 Downing Street and puzzle over when a pigeon isn't a pigeon.

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