Pockets banned for airport staff

Kathmandu's Tribhuvan airport has banned pants with pockets for employees. Authorities hope it will help prevent bribes. From BBC News:
The Commission for the Investigation of Abuse of Authority (CIAA) said it had sent a team to the airport to "observe the growing complaints about the behaviour of airport authorities and workers towards travellers".

"We discovered that the reports were true," spokesman Ishwori Prasad Paudyal told the AFP news agency.

"So we decided that airport officials should be given trousers with no pockets."
Nepal bans airline staff pockets (Thanks, Carlo Longino!)

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  1. We need this for airports in the US, but not for preventing bribes: for preventing TSA employees from picking what they like from peoples’ luggage and taking it home. This kind of regulation would be natural, since we already don’t trust travelers the privacy of their pockets. Why trust the TSA goons?

  2. Coleman Young tried the same thing in Detroit, with santitation workers. Didn’t work.

  3. So let me get this straight…

    They think that staff who think nothing of taking illegal bribes will hesitate to wear a money belt or pouch because that is against the rules?

  4. It used to be that employees for McDonalds didn’t have pockets in their uniforms either, and it was rumored to be the solution to till-dipping. But I noticed recently that this is not the case anymore. So either it wasn’t as good a solution as they thought it was, or they found an even better one.

  5. I think all the workers should be required to work naked, with a wax seal on all bodily orifices. That’ll teach ’em to take bribes!

  6. The guy who designed that solution took a bribe from the pocketless trouser lobbying group.

  7. When I flew out of Kathmandu in ’87, there was a small curtained booth everyone went through one at a time. I thought it was a metal detector. Instead, inside was a guy sitting on a folding chair with a submachine gun across his lap. He asked me if I had any weapons. I said no, and he let me out the other side.

    Don’t remember any pockets.

  8. a few more years and all we’re going to be allowed to wear in airports are translucent paper mumus and crocks. For the security, of course.

  9. #8: Mandated pantslessness for the TSA and their brethren round the world? Sold.

  10. They never needed pockets on Star Trek, I can’t see why this should be a problem.

  11. When I flew out of Kathmandu in ’87, there was a small curtained booth everyone went through one at a time. I thought it was a metal detector. Instead, inside was a guy sitting on a folding chair with a submachine gun across his lap.

    I flew out in 1990. After I checked my bags, someone came over to me and told me that my bag was buzzing. I opened it up and found that I had left a battery in something. No, not that kind of something. I took it out and no harm done. The airport’s so small that they immediately knew that it was my bag without asking. No hysteria. And this was during a major Maoist uprising.

  12. Am I naive in thinking that they oughtta try just firing people who take bribes?

  13. Wait everyone’s missing the point here!

    We could all learn from this.

    The Commission for the Investigation of Abuse of Authority (CIAA) said it had sent a team to the airport to “observe the growing complaints about the behaviour of airport authorities and workers towards travellers”.

    An authority with power over airline workers, listening to complaints about the behaviour of airport authorities and workers towards travellers.

    I sure as hell think that’s a pretty amazing feat!

  14. Does anyone know if they still jail people for smuggling in gold to Nepal? Artificially maintaining an officially higher price for gold within the country always struck me as such a strange practice…

  15. We shouldn’t allow securities traders in the US to have offshore bank accounts either…

  16. *Sigh* Once again, airlines demonstrate their lack of understanding of security issues.

    As with all of their other security measures, this amounts to treating the symptoms instead of the disease. There are a hundred other ways they could take bribes — denying them pockets won’t stop them. How about investigating, firing, and charging people who take bribes? This isn’t something new — police have been dealing with these situations for hundreds of years. You don’t have to make it impossible, you just have to have a sufficient deterrent, and since you can never prevent it entirely, catch and stop those who inevitably do it anyway.

    Unfortunately, I could sit here and scream until I’m blue in the face and no airline will ever hear me. Making logical arguments in the comments of a blog is little more than personal gratification.

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