Ultra-rare unopened Leica camera for sale with X-ray to prove what's inside the box

The Leica KE-7A is a very rare camera manufactured for the US military in the early 1970s. It's essentially a hardened and dust-resistant version of Leica's popular M4 camera. With around 500 produced, it's nearly impossible to find one in good condition. That's why this unopened specimen up on eBay right now is so special, and so expensive, priced at $45,300 or best offer. The listing includes an x-ray of the package.

According to the listing, the image below depicts another example of the same camera outfit as the one in the sealed package. But then again, how can you know for sure what's inside until you open it...

"Although I do not advise I can open the bag to inspect the camera for you at a Euro 5000 nonrefundable deposit," says the seller. "If you decide not to buy at any reason the deposit will not be refunded as the value will then be less."

Leica-KE-7A-camera-set-560x362

Notable Replies

  1. M_Dub says:

    Schrödinger's snapchat.

  2. Fucking Leicas.

    They irritate me. They usually aren't weather sealed whatsoever, and they cost a FORTUNE. For what? Leaf shutter? Other cameras have that. Good build quality? Other camera have that too. Good (expensive) glass? Other, again, have that.
    They were once the "known good" rugged option for photojournalists- small, light, durable, high quality- so they were a default. But that era is LONG gone, and I just don't see much of the allure.
    Actually, I think I have an excellent idea of what's going on: they've become cultural shorthand. They send a very clear elitist message that you can afford a wildly expensive camera that takes pictures exactly as good as the other cameras out there that cost less.
    And that's fine, I suppose. Everyone is entitled to spend their money their way. But recognize what it is. This isn't about a camera- this is about snobbery and exclusivity.

  3. You could apply this standard to most luxury goods.

  4. cah says:

    Precisely. It's why, for the period when Leica compacts were effectively just rebadged Panasonics, you paid a premium for the version with the red dot.

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