Boing Boing 

Cory Doctorow

I write books. My latest are: a YA graphic novel called In Real Life (with Jen Wang); a nonfiction book about the arts and the Internet called Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age (with introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer) and a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

Contact lens vending-machine


Spotted today in Berlin's Tegel airport, on my way to Re:publica.

Sweary guide to tomorrow's UK general elections


"The Coalition promised to do one thing above all else. Eliminate the fucking deficit (by 2016-17). Are they on track to do that? Are they fuck."

50% off O'Reilly books for the International Day Against DRM


O'Reilly is celebrating the International Day Against DRM with a 50% discount on its giant collection of technical books and videos (60% if you spend $100) -- just use discount code "DRM2015"

Talent, practice and doing the hard stuff

My latest Locus column, Shorter, is about the destructive myth of talent, which leads people to mistakenly believe that they're innately good at things, rather than having gotten good by practice.

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Crowdfunding medical MDMA and magic mushrooms

An activist couple (she's a neurscientist, he's a psychologist who successfully treated his depression with psychedelics) (they fight crime!) are raising $1M on Indiegogo to fund production of medical-grade MDMA and psilocybin.

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Kickstarting a second Oh Joy Sex Toy collection


The first collection of the smashing, sex-positive webcomic was such a success, they're doing it again!

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What it's like to share consciousness with an octopus


Marine biologist/US police brutality survivor/science fiction writer Peter Watts, in a brilliant vignette that, I hope, will be part of a novel someday:

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House Republicans hold hearing on politics in science, don't invite any scientists

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Locus Award finalists announced


The Locus Award -- nominated and voted by science fiction fans -- has published a particularly fine shortlist this year (in contrast to the hijacked Hugo Award ballot); I'm extremely proud to see my novella The Man Who Sold the Moon from Hieroglyph on the list.

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Kickstarting scenes from Star Wars cut from a single sheet of paper


Marc Hagan-Guirey's best known for his Horrorgami paper sculptures that reproduce buildings from horror movies from painstakingly cut, single sheets of paper.

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Guide to recording the police


Recording the police is legal, and it can mean the difference between accountability for peace officers and the gross injustice of abuse with impunity.

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Existential risks: RPGs versus real life


In 2012, Jim Henley got tongue cancer, but it was the good kind -- his odds are like making a save-against-death throw on a D8 and needing to beat a one.

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The microbes on your phone are different from the microbes on your shoes


But the microbes on your shoes are similar to the microbes on everyone else's shoes and the microbes on your phone are similar to the microbes on everyone else's phone.

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Tor and Bitlit offer discounted ebooks to print-book owners


Peter writes, "Macmillan has partnered with ebook bundling start-up BitLit to offer readers who own a print edition of Tor/Forge titles the opportunity to download a DRM free ebook edition using the free BitLit app (available for Ios/Android)."

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Remember when Gerber tried to market "baby food for teens?"


(Noluck_boston/Vintage Ads)

UK bigotry party hates Time Lords, too

UK Independence Party Nigel Farage is an equal-opportunity bigot, hating Gallifreyans just as much as he hates Bulgarians and Romanians.

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FBI replies to Stingray Freedom of Information request with 5,000 blank pages


The Stingray -- a fake cellphone tower that gathers identity/location information on everyone who passes it -- is the worst-kept secret in law enforcement, but that doesn't stop feds from going to absurd lengths to pretend they don't use them.

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