Cory Doctorow

I write books. My latest are: a YA graphic novel called In Real Life (with Jen Wang); a nonfiction book about the arts and the Internet called Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age (with introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer) and a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

Dollar Store Dungeons!


Rachel sends us "a series of posts about all the cool ways to use dollar store finds in tabletop RPGs. There is an amazing variety of useful things there, from things that could easily work as miniatures, to white boards for sketching maps or tracking initiative, to the cheapest source I've yet found for glass beads."

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Delware school district wants kids to get signed permission before checking out YA library books


The Appoquinimink, DE school board is contemplating requiring parental permission slips for students who want to check YA novels out of their school library; district secondary education curriculum director Ray Gravuer came up with this silly idea in response to a parental complaint.

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Discounted ebooks for readers who own Dilbert, Oatmeal and Nom Nom Paleo books


Peter writes, "Vancouver based ebook bundling start-up, Bitlit has signed a deal with Andrews McMeel publishing. The deal allows readers who own a paper copy of an Andrews McMeel book to get the eBook for 80% off. The deal includes comic collections from Matthew Inman (The Oatmeal) and Scott Adams (Dilbert), and Michelle Tam's bestselling cookbook Nom Nom Paleo."

Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and Doctor Who scarves and skirts


Etsy seller Rooby Lane makes great, nerdy textiles, sporting designs from sf/f TV and movies, like the Lord of the Rings and Marauders' Map map scarves and the Tardis skirt. (via Geeky Merch)

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EFF's copyfighter's crossword


EFF's annual crossword puzzle is a roundup of news stories from the world of digital civil liberties from 2014. Can you get 'em all without googling?

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TX SWAT team beats, deafens nude man in his own home, lies about arrest; judge declines to punish cops or DA


A well-meaning friend of Chad Chadwick called the Missouri City, TX police to say that he was afraid that Chadwick was having emotional difficulties; the cops lied to a judge to say that they had reason to believe Chadwick was heavily armed, then they sent a SWAT-team to his house (where he was asleep in the tub), beat 11 kinds of shit out of him, gave him permanent hearing loss, held him in solitary confinement, fraudulently accused him of resisting arrest, and tried to have him imprisoned -- he was acquitted, but a judge wouldn't punish the cops or the DA, because "There is no freestanding constitutional right to be free from malicious prosecution."

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Outfit a game-designer's toolkit for < $20


Game designer Rick Marazzani did an under-$20 raid on his local dollar store and built himself an incredible game-designer's toolkit with everything he needs to create an infinite variety of games in just as many styles; his reasoning for each piece is an especially telling glimpse of the game-designer's mindset:

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Telcos' anti-Net Neutrality argument may let the MPAA destroy DNS


The telcos' ongoing battle against Net Neutrality have led them to make a lot of silly legalistic arguments, but one in particular has opened the whole Internet to grave danger from a legal attack from the entertainment industry, which may finally realize its longstanding goal of subverting DNS to help it censor sites it dislikes, even if it makes life much easier for thieves and spies who use DNS tricks to rob and surveil.

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Musical time-machine to Walt Disney World in the late 1970s


The amazing Foxxfur has spent 3.5 years assembling a new installment in her "Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World" series, pulling together audio rarities from WDW in the late 1970s to create a six-hour soundscape that faithfully recreates the incidental music, cast member spiels, and ride narration from one of the golden ages of Disney themeparks.

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Western fairy tale characters as traditional Korean characters


Korean games illustrator Na Young Wu has an amazing series of illustrations called "Korean Western Fairy Tales," in which she redesigns familiar characters from western fairy tales (including several that have been adapted by Disney) and remakes them as traditional Korean characters.

Na Young Wu is a character illustration artist for games, and in what she calls her "Korean Western Fairy Tale" series, she uses her talents to reimagine familiar characters. Sometimes she uses the color palettes from Disney films, but in other pieces, she focuses on putting her own spin on the stories. You can see more of her Eastern-Western fairy tale illustrations on Twitter—and if you somehow still haven't enough of Frozen, she has her own take on Elsa on her blog.

Western Fairytales Get A Korean Makeover In Gorgeous Illustrations [Lauren Davis/IO9]

Cops cancel "let us search your house for guns" program

Police in Beloit, WI planned to fight gun-violence by asking citizens to let them come into their houses and search for guns, but not many people were interested in this offer.

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LISTEN: Wil Wheaton reads "Information Doesn't Want to Be Free"

I've posted the first chapter (MP3) of Wil Wheaton's reading of my book Information Doesn't Want to Be Free (which sports introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer!), which is available as a $15 DRM-free audiobook, sweetened by samples from Amanda Palmer and Dresden Dolls' "Coin-Operated Boy."

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Usbdriveby: horrifying proof-of-concept USB attack

Samy Kamkar has a proof-of-concept attack through which he plugs a small USB stick into an unlocked Mac OS X machine and then quickly and thoroughly compromises the machine, giving him total, stealthy control over the system in seconds, even reprogramming the built-in firewall to blind it to its actions.

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FCC seems to have lost hundreds of thousands of net neutrality comments

Evan from Fight for the Future writes, "The Sunlight Foundation released a study based on data that the FCC had released to the public about the most recent batch of net neutrality comments. We at Fight for the Future worked really hard to deliver more than 750,000 comments of our own to the FCC, but when we looked at the data, hundreds of thousands of them were missing. Our CTO Jeff Lyon just took to Reddit to try to get to the bottom of this. Maybe you can help?"

Kenya's Parliament erupts into chaos as government rams through brutal "anti-terrorism" law

MPs shredded their papers and threw them, and got into fistfights with one another over the new law, which allows the government to imprison suspects for 360 days without charge, and to fine press outlets millions for publishing articles "likely to cause fear or alarm" (this term is not defined in the statute).

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