Boing Boing 

Don’t video your friends running -- it’s intellectual property theft

runners

Sports fans visiting huge coliseums are fairly accustomed to having their YouTube videos of the game removed. Expensive sports tickets typically contain prohibitions against shooting vids in the venue (and that’s a debate in itself). But shots of everyday people huffing and puffing over grass in a public space? Come on. A new policy by the nation’s largest running organization -- USA Track and Field -- nixes YouTube clips shot at the races it organizes, most of which are casual amateur events.

When a small running club (of which I’m a member) had its footage removed from YouTube and then called to ask why, the track and field association responded by comparing themselves to the NBA and saying the offending shots (of awkward running people) infringed on its intellectual property assets. The video in question has been linked in this article on the ordeal (Trigger Warning: endless shots of running followed by frank depictions of people dancing badly at some afterparty.)

Fair use: a guide for artists

Pat from American University's Center for Media and Social Impact writes, "Can an artist use images from Facebook in her collage? Can an art teacher show pictures he took at an exhibition in class? Can a museum put a collection online?"

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Jabberwocky in Nadsat


John-Lewis translated Jabberwocky into Nadsat, the synthetic Russified English dialect spoken by the protagonist of A Clockwork Orange, starting with "Twas dobby and the chellovecks—"

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If dishwashers were Iphones


My latest Guardian column is design fiction in the form of an open letter from a dishwasher company whose kitchenware marketplace and Dish Rights Management system is under fire.

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EMI claims it owns copyright to videos of cats purring

Hugh writes, "YouTube's automated takedown tool is known for its flaws, but this week it crossed a line by attacking a purring cat. According to YouTube's Content-ID system both EMI Publishing and PRS own the rights to a 12 second purring loop. The cat in question, Phantom, has filed a dispute and hopes to reclaim his rights." (Thanks, Hugh!)

R2D2 handbags


These embroidered felt R2D2 handbags ($185, 17" high) are made to order in Moscow by Krukrustudio. (via Bonnie Burton)

An Adventure To Pepperland Through Rhyme & Space: hip hop/Beatles mashups

It's a kind of Grey Album 2.0: Beatles songs mashed up with KRS-One, Kool Moe Dee, Salt-n-Pepa, Nas, Rakim, WuTang, Public Enemy, Beastie Boys and many others -- get it before the censorship campaign kicks in!

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Modern farm equipment has no farmer-servicable parts inside


Ifixit's Kyle Wiens writes about the state of modern farm equipment, "black boxes outfitted with harvesting blades," whose diagnostic modes are jealously guarded, legally protected trade secrets, meaning that the baling-wire spirit of the American farm has been made subservient to the needs of multinational companies' greedy desire to control the repair and parts markets.

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Youtube ditches Flash, but it hardly matters

A year ago, the news that the world's biggest video site was abandoning proprietary software would have been incredible, but thanks to the World Wide Web Consortium's Netflix-driven DRM work, this changes very little.

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Necromantic lawyers say George Patton can't appear in video games


California's insane publicity rights regime mean that the general -- who's been dead for 69 years -- can't be a video-game character because people might mistakenly think he endorses the game.

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Kickstarting a new life for out-of-print sf classics


Once again, Brooklyn's wonderful sf bookstore Singularity & Co is running a Kickstarter drive to research and acquire the rights to lost, brilliant science fiction classics, convert them to ebooks, and release them as free or low-cost ebooks (the last campaign rescued 36 books!).

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DRM-free audiobook of Eastern Standard Tribe

Blackstone audio has produced a professional, DRM-free audiobook of my 2003 novel EST, a novel about jet-lag, conspiracies, management consultants, crypto-contracts and P2P that William Gibson called "Utterly contemporary and deeply peculiar -- a hard combination to beat (or, these days, to find)."

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Handmade Captain Marvel hoodie


This $60 handmade Captain Marvel hoodie (which has no hood!) is just one of many great superhero hoodies from Poland's Hoodie Dsz. (via The Mary Sue)

Canada reportedly caves, will extend copyright and yank James Bond out of the public domain

Michael Geist sez, "Last month, there were several Canadian media reports on how the work of Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, had entered the public domain. While this was oddly described as a 'copyright quirk', it was no quirk. The term of copyright in Canada (alongside TPP countries such as Japan and New Zealand) is presently life of the author plus an additional 50 years, a term that meets the international standard set by the Berne Convention. Those countries now appear to have caved to U.S. pressure as there are reports that they have agreed to extend to life plus 70 years as part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership."

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Free "freedom clip" turns off K-Cup DRM


Rogers Family Company Coffee and Tea is offering a free "Freedom Clip" that disables DRM in your new-model K-Cup machine, letting you use it with anyone's coffee pods.

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Patrick Costello: the deaf, copyfighting Merry God of Banjo


BB pal and deaf banjo-pickin' dude Patrick Costello writes, "The Washington Post just did a story about my work as a music teacher: ‘Merry God of banjo’"

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Rowlf the Dog covers Biz Markie's "Just a Friend"

It's an amazing piece of video editing/lip-syncing, right up there with Sesame Street Sure Shot.