Journalist believes his phone was hacked by spooks at HOPE X, will upload image for forensics


Douglas writes, "My rooted CyanogenMod phone got hacked at HOPE X. I'm planning to get it write-blocked and imaged to crowdsource forensics."

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Leaked manual shows how US agencies put millions on "suspected terrorist" list


The 166 page "March 2013 Watchlisting Guidance" was jointly authored by 19 agencies, and has been released in full on The Intercept.

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Back doors in Apple's mobile platform for law enforcement, bosses, spies (possibly)

Jonathan Zdziarski's HOPE X talk, Identifying Backdoors, Attack Points, and Surveillance Mechanisms in iOS Devices, suggests that hundreds of millions of Iphone and Ipad devices ship from Apple with intentional back-doors that can be exploited by law enforcement, identity thieves, spies, and employers.

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Everyone hates the NSA: survey


A new Pew Study asked people all over the world how they felt about being spied upon by the NSA.

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EFF releases high-resolution photo of NSA's Utah data-center


One particularly welcome dividend from the blimp flight over the NSA data-center in Bluffdale, Utah is a much-needed piece of stock art.

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Second German suspected of spying for NSA


The German government believes that one of its military personnel has been spying on the German state for the NSA.

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NSA and FBI spied on prominent Muslim American leaders


A newly disclosed Snowden leak reveals that the NSA targeted at least five prominent Muslim American leaders, including a former Republican Congressional nominee who served in GW Bush's Department of Homeland Security.

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NSA trove shows 9:1 ratio of innocents to suspicious people in "targeted surveillance"

NSA data shows that 90 percent of people surveilled are innocent Americans whom the agency is legally prohibited from spying upon. Cory Doctorow looks at what the NSA means when it says “targeted.”

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Germany spy arrested on suspicion of spying for NSA


A 31 year old employee of BND, the German foreign intelligence agency, has been arrested on suspicion of espionage on behalf of the NSA.

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Own your crypto-extremism with the Torrorist tee


Celebrate yesterday's news that the NSA classes all Tor users as "extremists" and targets them for indefinite, deep surveillance...with fashion!

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Edward Snowden to speak at HOPE X NYC


As if there weren't enough reasons to attend HOPE X in NYC this month, now there's a series of killer whistleblower presentations.

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ISPs sue UK spies over hack-attacks


ISPs in US, UK, Netherlands and South Korea are suing the UK spy agency GCHQ over its illegal attacks on their networks in the course of conducting surveillance.

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Seven things you should know about Tor

Tor (The Onion Router) is a military-grade, secure tool for increasing the privacy and anonymity of your communications; but it's been the subject of plenty of fear, uncertainty and doubt.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's 7 Things You Should Know About Tor debunks some of the most common myths about the service (which even the NSA can't break) and raises some important points about Tor's limitations.

7 Things You Should Know About Tor [Cooper Quintin/EFF]

Congress passes anti-mass surveillance amendment with overwhelming support


We did it! The US House of Representatives, under pressure from a mass phone-in campaign, passed an amendment to the Defense Appropriations Bill that prohibits the NSA from using its budget to sabotage Internet security or conduct "backdoor" mass surveillance. The amendment was passed with overwhelming, bipartisan support: 293 ayes, 123 nays, and 1 present. This isn't the end of the long project of reining in the NSA, but it's a very important first step. As a foreigner who isn't entitled to lobby Congress, I extend heartfelt thanks to all my American friends who took the time to call their lawmakers and demand adult supervision and lawful behavior from your out-of-control spies.

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NSA helps foreign governments conduct mass surveillance at home


A new release of Snowden's leaked NSA docs detail RAMPART-A, through which the NSA gives foreign governments the ability to conduct mass surveillance against their own populations in exchange for NSA access to their communications. RAMPART-A, is spread across 13 sites, accesses three terabytes/second from 70 cables and networks. It cost US taxpayers $170M between 2011 and 2013, allocated through the NSA's "black budget."

The NSA makes its foreign partners promise not to spy on the USA using its equipment and in return, agrees not to spy on its partners' populations (with "exceptions"). However, as was documented in Glenn Greenwald's indispensable No Place to Hide, the NSA has a simple trick for circumventing any promises not to spy on its partners' populations.

"No Place to Hide" revealed a list of 33 "third party" countries that assist the NSA in conducting mass surveillance, including Saudi Arabia, Israel, Singapore, Ethiopia, and 15 EU member states. These countries do not allow the NSA to spy on their own countries, but the NSA exploits a loophole to conduct this surveillance anyway: it will strike an agreement with Country A, on one end of a high-speed cable not to spy on it population, and with Country B, on the other end of the cable, not to spy on its population, but will conduct mass surveillance of Country A's communications from Country B and vice-versa.

How Secret Partners Expand NSA’s Surveillance Dragnet [Ryan Gallagher/The Intercept]