Study: with body-worn cameras, complaints against police "virtually vanish"

Complaints against police dropped by 93% when they were wearing body cameras, according to a University of Cambridge study that examined 2,000 officers in the US and UK.

Barak Ariel and Alex Sutherland from Cambridge's Institute of Criminology led the study. Ariel said:

Cooling down potentially volatile police-public interactions to the point where official grievances against the police have virtually vanished may well lead to the conclusion that the use of body-worn cameras represents a turning point in policing. There can be no doubt that body-worn cameras increase the transparency of frontline policing. Anything that has been recorded can be subsequently reviewed, scrutinised and submitted as evidence. Individual officers become more accountable, and modify their behaviour accordingly, while the more disingenuous complaints from the public fall by the wayside once footage is likely to reveal them as frivolous.

The full article, titled "Contagious Accountability," is available here.

Body-worn video - The independent witness (via University of Cambridge)