See a single atom in this magnificent photograph

See the tiny dot in the center of the photo above? That's a single strontium atom, visible to the naked eye. University of Oxford quantum physicist David Nadlinger's photo (full image below) won this year's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council's scientific photography competition.

“The idea of being able to see a single atom with the naked eye had struck me as a wonderfully direct and visceral bridge between the miniscule quantum world and our macroscopic reality," Nadlinger says. "A back-of-the-envelope calculation showed the numbers to be on my side, and when I set off to the lab with camera and tripods one quiet Sunday afternoon, I was rewarded with this particular picture of a small, pale blue dot.”

From the EPSRC:

'Single Atom in an Ion Trap’, by David Nadlinger, from the University of Oxford, shows the atom held by the fields emanating from the metal electrodes surrounding it. The distance between the small needle tips is about two millimetres.

When illuminated by a laser of the right blue-violet colour the atom absorbs and re-emits light particles sufficiently quickly for an ordinary camera to capture it in a long exposure photograph. The winning picture was taken through a window of the ultra-high vacuum chamber that houses the ion trap.

Laser-cooled atomic ions provide a pristine platform for exploring and harnessing the unique properties of quantum physics. They can serve as extremely accurate clocks and sensors or, as explored by the UK Networked Quantum Information Technologies Hub, as building blocks for future quantum computers, which could tackle problems that stymie even today’s largest supercomputers.

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First-ever YouTube Music Awards today, Nov 3 6pm EST; Xeni's a judge!

The 2013 You Tube Music Awards logo.

Today, November 3 2013, is the first-ever YouTube Music Awards, and they'll be streamed live from Pier 36 in New York City at 6 p.m. EST. The live stream is embedded below in this blog post.

I was invited to nominate ten of the most innovative music videos of 2013. Two of my favorites made the final cut and are up for votes: "Endless Fantasy" by chiptune hackers Anamanaguchi, above [vote for it here] was one.

The other, "Ingenue" by the Thom Yorke-led global glitch-funk band Atoms for Peace, below. Read the rest

Atoms for Peace play a surprise intimate show in Los Angeles

Thom Yorke had some choice words for a few inattentive listeners in the crowd at a secret-until-the-last-minute Atoms for Peace show in Los Angeles. Xeni was there to hear them, and to hear the otherworldly stream of magical beats that flowed forth from a red brick nightclub that once showcased John Coltrane and other jazz greats.