Album tells the story of the first Jeopardy! 3-way tie (set in ancient Greece)

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8 Responses to “Album tells the story of the first Jeopardy! 3-way tie (set in ancient Greece)”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Cool, but what is the image about?

  2. AirPillo says:

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  3. Anonymous says:

    so glad to see the learning music monthly project getting lots of bb love, they are great!

  4. skeletoncityrepeater says:

    I remember shouting out loud when I saw that happen. A truly beautiful moment, in all seriousness. We should celebrate March 16 instead of Christmas.

  5. MadMolecule says:

    It was very cool; I never miss Jeopardy!, and I shouted out loud when that happened. While the guy apparently did it in a spirit of sportsmanship, though, it was also the smart play for him:

    Going into Final Jeopardy, he had $16,000 and the other two had $8,000 each. (Or something; they had X and he had 2X, anyway.) He could have bet a dollar to go for the win, but if one or both of the others had doubled their money to $16,000, and he had missed the final question, he would have lost. By betting zero he could be assured of getting his $16,000, because he would at least tie the others, plus he was assured of coming back to play another day. (Players who tie for first all get their dollar amounts, and all come back the following day.)

    It was also smart because, if he’d beaten the other two, he’d have faced two unknown challengers the next day; this way he could have the same players come back the following day, and he knew he could beat those two, having done it once already.

    (There’s a lot of insight into the show in Bob Harris’s excellent and entertaining book Prisoner of Trebekistan: A Decade in Jeopardy!. I am not paid to say that.)

  6. rikchik says:

    “It was also smart because, if he’d beaten the other two, he’d have faced two unknown challengers the next day; this way he could have the same players come back the following day, and he knew he could beat those two, having done it once already.”

    Apparently not – he lost the next day, in Final Jeopardy. See http://www.j-archive.com/showplayer.php?player_id=3578 for game details.

  7. MadMolecule says:

    Well sure, anything can happen on any one show; Nancy Zerg, the lady who beat Ken Jennings, was a one-hit wonder and lost the following day. Still, if he were to play the probability, that’s the way to bet.

    …And now I just looked at the actual scores for the three-way tie episode, and I was wrong anyway; it was $13,400 to $8,000 to $8,000. So I guess everything I wrote above should be taken as an exercise in theoretical Jeopardy! strategy.

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