Where the Brillo box came from

Here's the secret history of the amazing, pop-art Brillo box:
At the time, Harvey was known, if at all, as a second-generation abstract expressionist painter who applied his oils so thickly that a 1961 New York Times review described him as "obviously having a love affair with his paint." (Washburn worked at the Graham Gallery, which had hosted several of Harvey's exhibitions.) But his day job was as a commercial artist for the industrial and package designers Stuart and Gunn, creating redesigns for companies like Philip Morris and Bristol-Myers. Three years before, Brillo implemented his drawings for a redesign of the company's packaging.
Shadow Boxer (via Dinosaurs and Robots)

6

  1. Two years ago I saw a kid repeatedly pummel one of Andy Warhol’s oversized Brillo Pad boxes at the National Art Gallery in Ottawa. Not a fan of pop art, apparently.

  2. This is where I fall out with pop art. The pop artists had a completely valid insight: Some packages look awesome. But they should then have become militant advocates of the artists who created the packages. The insight was shallow, but the designs weren’t. The critics became famous and not the original artists. Weird.

  3. ” …who applied his oils so thickly that a 1961 New York Times review described him as ‘obviously having a love affair with his paint.'”

    I don’t consider myself a great artist (I play around with acrylics at times), but I think pushing thick paint around on a canvas is one of the truest joys of life.

Comments are closed.