Tom the Dancing Bug: God-Man in "Slave Trade"

/ / COMMENTS

61

  1. So yes, if you read the old testament it has strict rules around correct slave ownership. Even stranger, these rules come right after Moses leads the Jews out of Egypt.

    What I think Ruben is missing here is that in the context of the times, having rules about how you could treat your slave was actually pretty progressive.

    1. What I think Ruben is missing here is that in the context of the times, having rules about how you could treat your slave was actually pretty progressive.

      I think the joke is supposed to be about Christian choosing which crazy O.T. bits to heed and which not to. Not so much the context.

    2. I don’t think Ruben is making fun of people who adhered to those texts in those times.

  2. I guess Tom’s making light of Old Testament law by looking at it from a modern perspective? Hah hah?

    Or maybe it’s a test to see if Jews get more agitated than Christians in Boing Boing comments when their religion is taken out and poked with a stick!

    Let’s sit down and see what happens!

    /grab popcorn

    1. I’m just surprised it took this long for anyone to comment on such a potentially abrasive topic. :-)

    2. I’ve never seen Jewish folks get agitated when people make fun of Judaism.

      Not sure why Christians are so adverse to criticism and humor, perhaps it’s a cultural thing?

      1. I bet you’ve only been observing diaspora Jews. The rabbinic court in Israel is not known for their sense of humor.

      2. Xenu – some of the best comedians in the world are Jewish. I can’t think of any truly funny Christian comedians. (Actually, I can’t think of any intentionally funny Christians at all.)

        There almost appears to be a correlation.

        1. George Carlin was raised Catholic, but in one of his later shows he did say that he didn’t believe in God anymore.

        2. I’m Christian and funny. Many of the funniest people I know are Christian. I can prove it: We like Office Space, Judd Apatow movies and Daniel Tosh.

      3. not sure… i’ve known quite a few more evangelical style christians who get jumpy.

        on the flipside are the vatican 2 style catholic priests who are weirdly subversive (for catholic priests) about hierarchy, dogmatism and authority…

    3. How is the mocking Judaism? It’s mocking Judaism, as well as Christianity, or did I miss the part in the New Testament where Jesus preached against slavery?

  3. It’s because Christianity is based in a large part on a persecution complex. Guilt and persuction are what Christianity is all about.

    For example, even in situations where they are a 99.99% majority, those “evil atheists” are out to take away Christmas, or “when people make fun of Muslims it’s a hate crime, so why is it ok when people make fun of Christians?” (I’ve actually heard this one many, many times).

  4. @Xenu: it’s because the jews that really care about this kind of stuff are forbidden to surf the Internet (it’s in Leviticus).

  5. As a member of the God-Man fan club I find it repulsive that you people are making fun of God-Man!

  6. Ironically, its in Christianity that you get a God-man, not Judaism.

    God-man may have forgotten Exodus 21:16

    1. Isaac would disagree with you, son. And Exodus 21:16 deals with kidnapping, not slavery.

      Slavery was explicitly condoned by the ancient Hebrews; fellow Israelites were automagically manumitted (presumably, by God-Man) after six years but foreign slaves could be kept forever although they could theoretically earn their freedom.

      Incidentally, it’s not just slaves and/or Jews that can’t gather sticks on the sabbath. You can put random strangers who aren’t even Jews to death for that.

      It’s also an offense against God-man to attempt to escape slavery.

      And finally, although you weren’t allowed to kill a slave in ancient Israel, you could still bury them alive or send them on a suicide errand.

      1. I always liked how Deuteronomy 23:15-16 explicitly requires people to provide safe harbor to escaped slaves. No turning them in. No oppressing them.

        Heh… why was there any need for an Underground Railroad in the God-fearing South? Can you imagine? “Say, boy, ain’t you Colonel Cleghorn’s slave? What are you doing so far off the plantation? Oh… you say you escaped, fair an’ square? Well, that’s just fine, then. Come set for a spell… let me fetch you a julep.”

        Do you suppose an escaped slave *ever* received sanctuary based solely upon those verses, other than by abolitionists? I find it hard to imagine.

    2. well, god-man could have been one of those strange gianty-type beings mentioned way back at the beginning of genesis… prob my fav bit of the bible.

  7. I’ve never seen Jewish folks get agitated when people make fun of Judaism. Not sure why Christians are so adverse to criticism and humor, perhaps it’s a cultural thing?

    Well, it’s probably because Jews learned early on to use humor as a way of breaking the tension when financial troubles related to the family’s sporting goods store sometimes led to conflict over the dinner table.

    Christians, by contrast, were influenced by their mother’s struggles with bipolar disorder and learned to associate jokes with the onset of a manic period. (By mother I mean Nancy, not Rita, who Christians’ father married after Nancy passed.)

    1. Pagans, by contrast, were too busy killing both the Jews and the Christians, and learned to associate jokes with beheading and disembowelment.

      1. Unlike those nice Christians and their wacky crusades. Nothing more charming than French Catholics torturing a million of their French Cathar neighbors to death.

        Dominique, nique, nique,
        S’en allait tous simplement
        Routier pauvre et chantant.
        En tous chemins, en tous lieux,
        Il ne parle que du bon Dieu,
        Il ne parle que du bon Dieu,

        A l’époque où Jean Sans Terre
        D’Angleterre était le roi,
        Dominique, notre Père,
        Combattit les Albigeois.

        1. it did make for a good movie though, on the upside :)

          oh wait, no, that was the Huguenots.

          1. yep. i think it was the costumes that did it for me. dark proddies and colourful catholics ;)

          2. Also, I’ve always used the original title because that’s how IMDb lists films. Except they just switched to English titles. More dumbing down for the demographic that rates Toy Story 3 at number 8 on the Top 250 films of all time.

          3. To be fair, at least that was still a good movie. Also your average moviegoer of 2010 hasn’t seen most of the other movies on that list so there’s bound to be a major bias toward contemporary popular films.

          4. Ten years ago, the upper reaches of that list were full of older and foreign film masterpieces. Get off my lawn.

  8. The Dead Sea Scrolls use “Schechina” almost exclusively, so God-Woman, then, can be said to be the Jews’ lord. Most historical-minded Jews consider God to be feminine (thus much of the impetus behind the Jewish Renewal and Reconstructionist movements).

    Wonderful cartoon.

  9. Oh yeah, those Christians, getting so riled up about little things.

    Hmmm, maybe there should be an “Allah-man” or “Mohammed-man” (take your pick of the various spellings) comic. Oh, no wait, South Park and Jyllands-Posten already tried that, and it went over so very well.

    But oh those Christians, just so unreasonably intolerant – why, there might even be a few disapproving words in the comments section!

  10. I love it when people argue over religion. It’s a bit like arguing over whether a unicorn can defeat a hippogriff. “My book of irrational beliefs is better than your book of irrational beliefs!”

    1. that’s silly. Even though the challenge rating of a unicorn is 1 higher then the hippogriff’s the unicorn possesses higher hit points, better attack bonus and over all higher DPS then the hippogriff, not to mention a selection special spells and abilities that the unicorn possesses.

      You might argue that the hippogriff can just fly away, but this just pushes a stalemate on an unwinnable scenario. Look it up! Numbers don’t lie.

      Same in both the old testament, Advanced and all the way thought to 3.5.

  11. I’m a Shabbat observing Orthodox Jew. I doesn’t wear wool and linen together. Yet, I am not offended by the cartoon.

    What I am offended by are the comments like “it’s because the jews that really care about this kind of stuff are forbidden to surf the Internet (it’s in Leviticus).” or “I bet you’ve only been observing diaspora Jews.”

    And then there’s the equal opportunity one from JadedLion: “Or maybe it’s a test to see if Jews get more agitated than Christians in Boing Boing comments when their religion is taken out and poked with a stick!”

    Or maybe “Anon”‘s Comment #12 which that great rabbinical and Biblical authority explained that Jews are just so darn evil.

    Bolling uses God-man as a way to poke fun at those who insist that God-man is on their side and no one else’s. He uses it to question simplistic religious beliefs. It makes us think. That is good.

    Many of these comments (except probably #12) are probably written by people who think of themselves as great progressive/liberal/leftist thinkers who unlike their opponents on the right, are part of the enlightened free thinking populace, free from bigotry and prejudice of those who they despise.

    For the record, I’m a life long bleeding heart liberal Democrat. I’m about as leftwing as you can get with a 401K plan. And, I can tell you that there is as much bigotry and unreasonable hatred on the left as there is on the right.

    Read over your comments. Examine what you think. Question your motives. One of the great lessons of religion (almost any religion) is that you’re not as hot as you think you are. You’re not that special.

    1. I love this response! And I totally agree.
      I am a Jesus-loving, left-leaning, science-doing fella.
      Often, I am tempted to enter the battles taking place here (and on other blogs) but I know it’s a waste of time with some flamers.
      I don’t mind when others attack Christianity; I’m just a little sad that so many are missing it’s beautiful message.

      1. For #25 and #47, I can see why you find a lot of the comments here offensive, and I think that many people don’t understand the line between being funny and just being mean, which certainly causes problems.

        But you are just as wrong to generalize good things about your own religions. If people find religion to be a tool that allows them to be humble or love other people, that’s great for them and it’s doing a good thing. But we all know that there are tons of religious communities that teach superiority and hatred, and that they often get to shield themselves behind being religious to avoid the scrutiny they would get otherwise.

        There are plenty of mean religious people out there just like there are plenty of mean atheists. We all know that you can be an arrogant jerk whether you are religious or not, and maybe we should expect that being religious or not has very little to do with whether you are such a jerk or not (though for the record I admit that I do think atheists are, on average, more kind, humble and caring than non-atheists – I just doubt it would be a very large difference).

        But this goes directly to the point is made by ridiculing portions of the bible. The point that atheists have been making for a while now: people do not actually look to religion for moral guidance. At best people look to whatever parts of religion they have been taught, at worst they look to whatever parts support their whims. You’ll find kind Christians and hateful Christians just like you’ll find kind atheists and hateful Atheists. For kind Christians their beliefs probably seem central to their kindness but hateful Christians think their believes are central to their hatred.

        You have a sense of what is right and what is wrong, and it has been shaped by some traits you have “inherently” as well as (and to a much greater extent) your environment. But even if religion was an important part of *your* environment religion isn’t, in general, an important ingredient in environments that make things better or that make people kinder, humbler, or give people any other positive trait.

  12. The OT is full of stories where god flooded the earth, brought on plagues, and destroyed cities and whole populations because his people weren’t paying adequate attention to him or because others were picking on his people. Apparently hell hadn’t been invented yet, so he couldn’t just count on them suffering in the afterlife. His latest idea to torment the human race is to show up on earth in a baby costume and make so much division that we destroy ourselves. So far it seems to be working.

    Oh, and – Weird Al is a goy? I had no idea.

  13. There is a Biblical verse authorizing lenient treatment for the accidental death of a slave right next to one authorizing lenient treatment for the accidental death of a fetus.

    Clearly, that means abortion and slavery were supposed to be abolished at the same time.

    1. There is a Biblical verse authorizing lenient treatment for the accidental death of a slave right next to one authorizing lenient treatment for the accidental death of a fetus.

      Clearly that means that misogyny and slavery were supposed to be abolished at the same time.

      There, fixed it for you.

      (accidental death of a fetus means women were punished for having miscarriages)

  14. “Go immediately and be stoned.”

    Done! Now, where did I put that brownie mix? Anybody else have a really dry mouth? You know what’s a funny word? Beetle. Beetle, beetle, beetle. Wait, what?

  15. Anon: the rules about slaves were progressive for their time? Since God-Man wrote those rules, are you saying God-Man was ascending a moral learning curve over the years? God-Man started out sociopathic, then rethought his positions?

    Or are you saying that men wrote the books, not God-Man?

  16. And oh, yes, Jesu bin Josef was a Jew, and an observant one at that – he believed in the laws concerning slave treatment.

  17. >> I can prove it: We like Office Space, Judd Apatow movies and Daniel Tosh.

    I hope that was a joke.

Comments are closed.