Dune with no dialog

Discuss

134 Responses to “Dune with no dialog”

  1. Antinous / Moderator says:

    How about Dune Without The Incomprehensible Casting Decisions? Or perhaps, Dune With Facial Expressions?

    • Sciurus says:

      I think giving it a completely new go from the ground up. Put Luc Besson in charge and I personally believe you’d have the silver screen masterpiece that Dune deserved. Then again I am just a fan-boy of both Besson and Dune.

  2. Jonathan Korman says:

    Magnificent.

    But what we REALLY need is a version of John Williams’ six-opera cycle “Star Wars” with the dialogue removed.

  3. jeffasselin says:

    Strange casting decisions? I don’t know, I always thought most of the cast fit decently well. I couldn’t watch the scifi series because of the casting, because it was too different from the movie

    Facial expressions? In Dune? No, the atonal conversations are perfect for the required setting.

    This is still one of my favorite books of all time, but it has always been clear that the book is unfilmable. Instead what Lynch gave us was a sort of visual and artistic experiment. Does it work as a movie? Barely. Is it a movie translation of the book? I’m not sure such a thing is possible.

    One of the things I always loved about this book is how most of the characters are supposed to be absurdly more intelligent than I am, and I think that as such it works. To translate that to a movie means making a movie most people won’t understand, or even less appreciate, so it is doomed to commercial failure.

    I happen to like the movie despite its flaws. It brings up some emotions and thoughts few movies elicit in me.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      - 27 year-old Kyle MacLachlan as a 13 year-old Paul, and Sting in his mid-thirties as a late-teen Feyd-Rautha?
      - Thufir Hawat was supposed to be a Master of Assassins, not a Muppet version of a Cabbage Patch Doll. That’s the role that calls for Dennis Hopper.
      - Virginia Madsen has about as much imperial cunning as a turnip farmer’s daughter.
      - Francesca Annis plays Jessica as a limp dishrag. Alice Krige in CoD does a great job with that part.
      - Ian McNiece also does a creditable job in the Dune and CoD miniseries, but the 1984 film turns the Baron into – I wouldn’t say so much fat Frank Booth with boils – as fat Carrot Top with weapons. Or maybe Wez without the mohawk.

      On the plus side, Patrick Stewart was impeccable, and Linda Hunt stole the film.

      • WizarDru says:

        Well, let’s be fair, here: that has far more to do with Hollywood than with the movie in specific. I mean, almost of the characters in Game of Thrones are cast as older than the books, for example. Its one reason I think Ender’s Game will never be made.

        Not that it’s that much different, but Kyle Mclachlan was 23 when cast and just turned 24 when filming began, not 27.

      • Gulliver says:

        Ian McNiece also does a creditable job in the Dune and CoD miniseries, but the 1984 film turns the Baron into – I wouldn’t say so much fat Frank Booth with boils – as fat Carrot Top with weapons.

        McNiece did a better Baron (it’d be hard to do worse than McMillan) in the Dune miniseries, but he really nailed the Baron in Children of Dune as the ego-memory possessing Alia.

      • Gulliver says:

        Virginia Madsen has about as much imperial cunning as a turnip farmer’s daughter.

        To be fair, Irulan was mostly behind the scenes in the novel. Probably the only thing I liked better in the SciFi Channel miniseries than in the novel was the way they made her a more integral part of the story. Julie Cox brought life to the historian behind the novel’s Irulan quotes.

    • MrWoods says:

      Hi jeffasselin,

      It’s funny I’ve reached the exact opposite conclusion. Dune fails as a movie because it is too much like the novel, in fact it fails in the same ways the novel does: too much exposition, poor pacing (esp. the third act), and random tangents.

      I’d welcome a Dune that is more Lynch and less Herbert.

    • Anonymous says:

      Imho its still not (real) possible to make a movie out of this masterpiece on book(s). I red Dune (1-6) sooo fxxxing often… and… i think, its a decent little flick, a try… love the artwork and music =)

  4. Anonymous says:

    How about Dune with Dune?

  5. jeligula says:

    Dune without all the annoying self-whispering? Sign me up.

  6. Rob Beschizza says:

    I’ll admit that the idea of Luc Besson doesn’t appeal to me. It’d be too much his own thing; could you imagine a Terry Gilliam Dune? That’s a rhetorical question.

    I quite liked the idea of Dune shot as a realistic action-thriller in the style of “The Kingdom”, presumably with lots of focus on the political dimensions — the director of that was on board for doing so a few years ago, but left the project.

    A better miniseries than Sci-Fi’s OK one of about 10 years ago — think a 12 show season just to cover the first novel — would be pretty good, too. Ronald Moore might be too obvious, but I think he’d do a very good job.

    • cinemajay says:

      I think you’re on the right track with the TV series. Done on HBO in the vein of Game of Thrones perhaps?

      Great edit, BTW. I can’t recall the scene in the book, but it seems like it would have been all telepathy anyway!

    • Gulliver says:

      I quite liked the idea of Dune shot as a realistic action-thriller in the style of “The Kingdom”, presumably with lots of focus on the political dimensions — the director of that was on board for doing so a few years ago, but left the project.

      A better miniseries than Sci-Fi’s OK one of about 10 years ago

      It was less cringe-inducing than the film, but too bland and pop-cultury for my taste.

      think a 12 show season just to cover the first novel — would be pretty good, too. Ronald Moore might be too obvious, but I think he’d do a very good job.

      Although I tend to agree with the people who say Dune translates poorly to visual media, if any director could pull it off, it’d be Moore.

      • the Other michael says:

        >if any director could pull it off, it’d be Moore.

        I would readily contribute to a kick-starter for Michael Moore’s Dune

  7. Flashman says:

    I guess I was too young when I saw this (I remember my stepfather taking me to see it when I was 10 or so) to know that that interior has been copied directly from Hanz Poelzig’s Großes Schauspielhaus in Berlin:

    http://boiteaoutils.blogspot.com/2008/01/exposition-hans-poelzig.html

  8. Snig says:

    The obvious way would be to take the extended TV cut and Benny Hillify it, thereby extracting the overwrought dialog and bringing screen time down.

    I do like this version. In the same way black and white comics can sometimes outshine colored ones, more is certainly not always better. It’d be good as a companion piece to the book, moving illustrations for it instead of a separate work.

    Also, does everyone else assume that Spice tastes and smells like cinnamon? I got that association a couple decades ago and can’t shake it.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Same concept applies to porn.

  10. Rob Beschizza says:

    Herbert described it as smelling like “bitter” cinnamon in the novel, so that might be where the association comes from.

    I’ll do the rest of the movie if it NBC Universal is amenable to it. I know that’s not very fightin’ wordsy but it’d be lots of work and I’d rather not turn a cool experiment into a fight over fair use.

    • Phyrkrakr says:

      You’ve done enough to prove the concept, now you just need to let somebody with an EFF membership do the rest of it.

  11. Anonymous says:

    You’ve turned it into a ballet! I would love to watch the finished 45-minute version (or however long it turns out to be). It has everything I love in ballet: beautiful costumes, pretty sets, and a plot conveyed entirely through action and the characters’ emotions.

  12. dhl says:

    Improved, thanks.

    I think you’re getting into Matthew Barney territory with this concept and imho that’s a good thing.

  13. Anonymous says:

    Wow. I think you should go ahead and finish it. It could be pretty spectacular. Only gripe is the sound design. I feel like with the dialog removed, you’d need to redo the sound so that it was a little more expressive.

  14. Nicky G says:

    Bah, I like the movie version of Dune. Sure, it’s not the novel, which is obviously superior. But it’s not THAT bad, in fact, I think it’s a lot of fun. So pooh on ya’ll. Do I lose my sci-fi geek badge now, or something? ;-P

    • Jake0748 says:

      Well… you don’t totally lose your sci-fi geek badge just yet. But for now we will hold it in escrow for you. Come on… the guy who played the Baron just did not work. And Sting flying round him in his anti-gravity underpants was just way too much to bear.

      When I read the book for the first time I imagined the Baron Harkonnen and his nephew as unspeakably evil, not some goofy parody.

      • billstewart says:

        (The worms….. the spice….)

        Dittoes on just about everything Jake0748 said.

        (The worms….. the spice….)

        However, at least in the 4-hour version of the movie, much of it pretty much worked for me. The theater version was just hacked and slashed too badly to really get what was going on.

        (The worms….. the spice….)

        I’d made the mistake of rereading the book before watching the movie, so I was mostly being annoyed at the differences instead of watching the gorgeous early-steampunk visuals.

  15. wil9000 says:

    Do you know what could be done to improve David Lynch’s version of Dune? ANYTHING! I hadn’t watched it in a long time, and just happened upon it just the other day. I could only stomach the first half hour or so. I remember being ambivalent to it when it was new, but now I can only think that the primary direction to the actors was: “Don’t ACT, OVER ACT!”. It’s all so over-wrought and it takes itself so seriously, like, out of the gate, from the first frame of film, it think’s that it’s one of the greatest films ever made.

  16. retrac13 says:

    This is a really cool idea! Reminds me of two things I’d like to share:

    1) John Hodgman’s TED talk. He briefly discusses his (character’s?) take on the film. Funny, as usual!

    http://www.ted.com/talks/john_hodgman_s_brief_digression.html

    2) Nicholas Rombes’ book Cinema in the Digital Age.

    http://www.amazon.com/Cinema-Digital-Age-Nicholas-Rombes/dp/1905674856

    A great read, for a number of reasons. One one particular thing Rombes discusses that seems relevant at the moment is the way digital video technologies (such as YouTube) allow the average person to interact with and dissect movies in ways that were far more difficult with film. The ease of pausing, re-editing, etc. allows us to unearth all kinds of cool things that were lurking in films all along. For example, “loads of robed witches, psychedelic space travel, freaky monsters, and the Toto and Brian Eno soundtrack.”

    A somewhat similar exercise he describes trying out: going to a hollywood blockbuster CGI-fest (Superman, for example) in the theater, but wearing an mp3 player instead of listening to the soundtrack. The result: spontaneous, serendipitous, surrealist music video mix!

    P.S. Sorry this post got so long!

    • Gulliver says:

      One one particular thing Rombes discusses that seems relevant at the moment is the way digital video technologies (such as YouTube) allow the average person to interact with and dissect movies in ways that were far more difficult with film. The ease of pausing, re-editing, etc. allows us to unearth all kinds of cool things that were lurking in films all along.

      David Brin’s novel Earth gets more relevant every nanosecond.

      A somewhat similar exercise he describes trying out: going to a hollywood blockbuster CGI-fest (Superman, for example) in the theater, but wearing an mp3 player instead of listening to the soundtrack. The result: spontaneous, serendipitous, surrealist music video mix!

      I just got a call from the MPAA. Your senses aren’t licensed for that!

  17. Zhiva says:

    Vimeo:

    Sorry, “Dune without Dialog” was deleted at 11:37:45 Mon Jul 18, 2011. We have no more information about it on our mainframe or elsewhere.

  18. agitprop says:

    This movie was a major disappointment. I’d love to see it reworked but I don’t think removing all the dialog will make it watchable. You’d also have to improve some of the cheesy effects (remember the glowing blue eyes?) and get rid of Sting.

  19. noen says:

    Ah yes, Dune. What a horrible novel that was. All the women are either whores or witches. After all, if what you want is *real* misogyny, read science fiction.

    • Gulliver says:

      After all, if what you want is *real* misogyny, read science fiction.

      If you think the society in Dune reflects the author’s own outlook on what society should be, I’m skeptical, but maybe you’re right. But there are a lot of good talented people writing and publishing science/speculative fiction, including a growing list of feminist SF writers. When you dismiss the whole genre with, Them, they hate women and their work is shit, that I take exception to.

      Even so, I’m sorry I resorted to name calling. I still think you were being supercilious, but that’s no excuse for bad manners on my part.

      It is unfortunate, IMHO, that you’ll miss out on all of the good, progressive and increasingly literary SF, fantasy and cross-genre fiction being published.

      • noen says:

        “It is unfortunate, IMHO, that you’ll miss out on all of the good, progressive and increasingly literary SF, fantasy and cross-genre fiction being published.”

        That may be, I wouldn’t know because as I said I stopped reading it thirty years ago. Why? Orson Scott Card — “Enders Game” is a sympathetic retelling of the life of Adolph Hitler and Card didn’t even write it. Robert Heinlein — Puts the nut into wing-nut. Right wing conservative extremist, misogynist and Libertarian nut job. Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle — Pro military conservative extremists. I put aside sci-fi for the same reason I don’t read Any Rand. There is no there there.

        I dislike most of popular culture. I want movies and books that are human. Where people interact as humans, with actors who act, that tell a real story and not a fantasy. If there must be an imaginary landscape then I want it realistic. Not peopled with children acting out an insane or narcissistic narrative.

        Real life is conducted on a human stage. I don’t live in Harry Potter’s world or the Transformer’s world. I don’t wet myself when I see a dead lifeless robot (Data) pretend it’s human. I don’t think a plot is improved by adding time travel, teleportation or aliens.

        Popular culture, when it isn’t out right obscene, is just plain bland and boring as hell. Has a good Star Trek movie or TV show ever been made? Maybe one or two. I saw Harry Potter this weekend and was bored out of my mind.

        I cannot stomach this crap and this blog is one place where I get to say that.

        Ya know, the internet still has this big problem. Out there in the real world (as if this wasn’t but anyway) it is filled with people who are not you (or me). In real life you can live with another human being for years and never *really* know them. But in this landscape everyone aggregates with others that are only like themselves. It’s incestuous.

        I will not do that. I go to so-called geek blogs or atheist blogs like this because I want difference from me. I don’t want to merge into sameness with others. Unlike the “ugly American” who is now the ugly internetizen I don’t want to travel to a far and distant land only to eat at McDonalds and sleep in the Howard Jonhsons.

        What I find everywhere on the net is a new tribalism. I am acting against that. I am not of your tribe and I will make it clear to you how profoundly I am not you.

        It’s for your own good. ;)

        • IWood says:

          Huh. I can do all that just by sitting here.

        • the Other michael says:

          >I want movies and books that are human. Where people interact as humans, with actors who act, that tell a real story and not a fantasy.

          That’s not movies and books, that’s real-life.

          Movies and books are fiction. By definition, they are fantasy and not real.

        • Gulliver says:

          I dislike most of popular culture.

          So do I. Sturgeon’s Law and, generally, the bell curve apply to pop culture and most human activities. But ten percent, or even one percent, of culture is still more than I will ever experience.

          I want movies and books that are human. Where people interact as humans, with actors who act, that tell a real story and not a fantasy. If there must be an imaginary landscape then I want it realistic. Not peopled with children acting out an insane or narcissistic narrative.

          Realistic in what way? It’s been my experience that the best fiction reveals truth even if its setting is fantastical. Human truths are human even if they’re conveyed through stories about a “dead lifeless robot” who has human interactions in spite of embodying the alienation and emotional abyss many of us deal with as a fact of life. You want to call that childish, insane or narcissistic, that’s obviously your prerogative, but not all of us want to confront head on the snake pit people turn society into 24/7/365.

          If someone spent all their time embubbled in fantasy, that would be unhealthy. But a little imagination now and again is good exercise and a little escape from uncompromising “realism” a much needed relief.

          Also, in “real life” people are often indifferent, introverted, or at each other’s throats both literally and verbally with a rancor that I, quite frankly, can only take so much of. My single biggest reason for loving books, not only fiction (of all kinds of stories both grounded and fantastical), but also nonfiction, is that, at their best, they can distill the hearts of their authors into words more open and sincere than they ever would in person.

          But I acknowledge that I cannot be objective about it. There was a time in my life when the only thing keeping me from ending it was the unlimited horizon of books, and especially of speculative fiction. Since I literally owe writers my life, I am probably a little more inclined to be riled by general attacks on their human decency.

          Real life is conducted on a human stage. I don’t live in Harry Potter’s world or the Transformer’s world. I don’t wet myself when I see a dead lifeless robot (Data) pretend it’s human. I don’t think a plot is improved by adding time travel, teleportation or aliens.

          Harry Potter and Transformers are hardly paragons of fiction. I wouldn’t know about the Harry Potter books, but I regret the money and time I spent watching the first film in each of those two franchises (especially Transformers) – not because they are about wizards or robots, but because the plots were, to me, boring. And believe me, I know crap writing, I’ve created plenty of it myself. The elements you mention, though, are only furniture. On their own, they neither improve nor degrade a plot.

          I cannot stomach this crap and this blog is one place where I get to say that.

          Fair enough. And, to repeat, I’m sorry I replied rudely to your doing so. But, as you may know, Cory Doctorow and Rob Beschizza both write fiction, Cory mostly speculative/science fiction. Surely you’ll agree he’s not misogynistic.

          Ya know, the internet still has this big problem. Out there in the real world (as if this wasn’t but anyway) it is filled with people who are not you (or me). In real life you can live with another human being for years and never *really* know them. But in this landscape everyone aggregates with others that are only like themselves. It’s incestuous.

          Do you think Boingers are all alike?

          I will not do that. I go to so-called geek blogs or atheist blogs like this because I want difference from me. I don’t want to merge into sameness with others. Unlike the “ugly American” who is now the ugly internetizen I don’t want to travel to a far and distant land only to eat at McDonalds and sleep in the Howard Jonhsons.

          On the internet I can connect with people I’d either never meet in “real life” or who would never reveal their inner thoughts if I did. In real life, drawing people out is like pulling teeth. I could be surrounded by fellow geeks and agnostics and never know it. Occasionally someone will allow themselves to be engaged in the type of conversations I get all the time on blogs such as this, and that’s the highlight of my otherwise drudgery-filled day.

          Although I was irritated by your dismissal of SF qua SF, I do not agree with the commenters labeling you a troll. A troll cynically pushes buttons for the express purposes of inciting flaming. I believe you simply expressed opinions, one of which I vehemently disagree with. Not that I imagine you care one iota what I think, but I still wanted to be clear.

        • Tdawwg says:

          Read Samuel R. Delany. Dhalgren is perhaps the best American monument of the Counterculture (right up there with the more canonical Gravity’s Rainbow); Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand is the most convincing portrayal of multiculturalism and pluralism in narrative: published in 1984, it’s the best antidote to the Reagan ’80s one could find. They’re incredibly literary, brilliant, lovely, suggestive, whatever, proffering all of the pleasures one seeks out fiction to find.

          Literary scholars dropped the whole high–low culture thing way, way back, BTW. Most common readers never even embraced the false dichotomy. Cheer up, books are fun!

    • Anonymous says:

      You didn’t read the same book I read.

    • Gulliver says:

      Ah yes, Dune. What a horrible novel that was. All the women are either whores or witches. After all, if what you want is *real* misogyny, read science fiction.

      You got something against “whores” and “witches”? What are you some kind of religious fundie? Maybe you and the Baron would get right along since he shares you attitude towards the Bene Gesserit.

      I assume you stopped reading science fiction after you finished Dune. Blanket statement much?

      • noen says:

        “You got something against “whores” and “witches”?”

        I think it tells us something about Frank Herbert and other SciFi authors like him that they can only imagine women as filling those roles. It speaks to a profoundly impoverished imagination.

        “What are you some kind of religious fundie?”

        I guess I must be since for you the only two categories available to me are “agrees with me” or “fundie”.

        “Maybe you and the Baron would get right along since he shares you attitude towards the Bene Gesserit.”

        Maybe some day when you get older and you have a relationship with a real woman instead of your right hand you might come to realize what an obscene characterture Frank Herbert’s women are.

        “I assume you stopped reading science fiction after you finished Dune. Blanket statement much?”

        I stopped reading it after high school. I also stopped watching cartoons with my Fruit Loops. All genre fiction, sci-fi, mystery, romance, crime, fantasy, are lesser art forms. Occasionally an author rises above the rest but they do that by leaving their genre’s tropes behind them and introducing radical concepts like character development and a plot. It’s not just the women of Dune who are cardboard cut-outs. So are the men. All the mentats are just… mentats with different names glommed on. All of his characters are nothing more than types. What was Paul Atreides’ relationship with Chani like? Did they even have one? No, there was no relationship there at all. Don’t tell me “Jack loves Jill” show me *how* he loves her. There was no one in the entire Dune series for me to identify with.

        And then there is the hideous plot. Which is: “it’s ok to conduct genocide on all of humanity and murder 60 billion people for their own good in the name of science”.

        • bardfinn says:

          You say the plot is about it being OK to murder billions of people in the name of science, or power.

          When I read Dune (the first novel) – I read a story about a kid, thrust into a cultural position that he’d been educated about, where he knew that he was able to avenge the torture and murder of his father — and all he had to do to get revenge, was thrust the entire known universe into a thousand years of oppression and impoverishment in his name. It was about his intense struggle to keep atop an unsteerable movement, silently desperate to find the right time to act to prevent the Fremen from starting a holy war in his name as a result of thousands of years of oppression and cultural belief, never tipping his hand or faltering. It was about how he wanted and longed for a simple life — and had to sacrifice that so others could have a simple life. The later books were about how civilisation marches on, and even if one succeeds at staving off the entropy of civilisation, it’s never going to stop your descendants from descending into decadence and tyranny.

          I read a book in which a Duke, whose hands were tied by cultural politics, wanted liberation for the woman he loved, where women were as subject to the culture’s expectations of then as the men were, of Jessica and Paul emerging into a culture where women were given equal station, and had powerful roles rather than being chained as a breeding programme to produce a superhuman. I read about how Paul failed to bring equality and justice to the woman he loved, as his father did before him, and failed to prevent the holy war he feared and dreaded, by finally having revenge for his father’s murder, by stepping fully into the role society expected of him — surrendering to the injustices of history perpetuated.

          I read a very different book than you did.

        • Antinous / Moderator says:

          Actually, there aren’t any whores that I recall. Concubinage, in this case, is more like a sideways version of morganatic marriage. But having your lead female character wander around saying, “I exist only to serve” does raise some issues about his perceptions of women.

          • shadowfirebird says:

            Sure, it raises some questions. But they’re mostly answered by the opening page in the book. “This is a work of fiction. Any resemblance to…”

            Are we saying that writers aren’t allowed to write about societies where women are repressed? Or that they can only do so unrealistically, by including women that aren’t?

          • Gulliver says:

            Are we saying that writers aren’t allowed to write about societies where women are repressed? Or that they can only do so unrealistically, by including women that aren’t?

            Apparently if you depict injustice, that means you must be for it.

          • shadowfirebird says:

            Some of the most powerful characters in the universe of the first Dune book are women: most notably. the one force that everyone fears are the Bene Gessarit.

            I think it’s indicative of where the author was trying to take us that we spend so much time in Jessica’s head and so little in the Duke’s. Her decision to begat Paul is the pivotal event behind everything that happens in the book, and in order for this not to be a simple adventure story, the person that made that decision needs to be a 3d character.

            Antinous is quite correct: this is a society that represses women. Except, apart from in a very simple sense, people can’t be repressed. They stay important. Is the Shadout Mapes unimportant? Is Chani? Is Jessica? No.

          • Gulliver says:

            Only one character uses the term whore to describe a Bene Gesserit, Baron Harkonnen.

            Well, him and neon.

          • Snig says:

            Maybe not a connection Frank Herbert intended, but the word “samurai” also can be translated as “one who serves (nobles)”.

        • Gulliver says:

          I guess I must be since for you the only two categories available to me are “agrees with me” or “fundie”.

          If you could deign to descend from your high moral horse to the unwashed masses below, you might not come off as a judgmental prick. You call a powerful sisterhood whores, then you object when someone equates you with religious fanatics.

          I stopped reading it after high school. I also stopped watching cartoons with my Fruit Loops. All genre fiction, sci-fi, mystery, romance, crime, fantasy, are lesser art forms.

          Must be lonely up there. If only we could all be as discriminating readers and brilliant artists as your august self…

          How many literary awards have you won, or do they only gives those out to hacks as well?

          And then there is the hideous plot. Which is: “it’s ok to conduct genocide on all of humanity and murder 60 billion people for their own good in the name of science”.

          Or it could be a warning of what happens when religion and tyranny run amok. But if exposition is promotion then I can see why you think so many stories are “hideous”.

          • Antinous / Moderator says:

            If you could deign to descend from your high moral horse to the unwashed masses below, you might not come off as a judgmental prick.

            Do you really want to refer to a woman commenter as a prick? Rudeness aside, you’re not exactly bolstering your qualifications for commenting on women’s issues.

            You call a powerful sisterhood whores, then you object when someone equates you with religious fanatics.

            The BG exist to serve as broodmares. That’s their entire purpose. I’m not sure that really qualifies as a powerful sisterhood.

          • dculberson says:

            The BG exist to serve as broodmares.

            That, right there, is a profound mistake. They exist as a super power in the Dune universe. They provide some of their members as “broodmares,” to use your term, but that is done to further the agenda of and increase the power of the BG. Thus they have their eyes, ears, and brains in every great house of the known universe, and have the sympathy of the heads of those houses. It’s intellectually dishonest to claim that their sole role is as breeding stock.

          • shadowfirebird says:

            Who decides that the Bene Gessarit exist to serve as broodmares? Why, the Bene Gessarit do…

            Plus, they are everywhere in the known universe, and have been so for so long that they have deliberately engineered ancient legends on every planet *just in case one of their number will later find it useful*.

            And they are universally feared — even by the emperor.

            Powerless?

          • Gulliver says:

            Do you really want to refer to a woman commenter as a prick?

            I didn’t know what neon’s gender is until you told me, nor do I choose my retorts based on such information. But you’re right, name calling was uncalled for and rude and spoken out of anger which is never a good idea. I apologize to neon for sinking to her level.

            Rudeness aside, you’re not exactly bolstering your qualifications for commenting on women’s issues.

            My intent was not to comment on women’s issues. My intent was to voice my irritation at blanket denigration of whole artistic genres and even forms from a holier-than-thou perspective. I do not like it when someone runs rough shod over generalized categories of people.

            The BG exist to serve as broodmares. That’s their entire purpose. I’m not sure that really qualifies as a powerful sisterhood.

            On a political level, they and the Guild basically run the Empire. On a societal level, they arrange marriages of the aristocracy and manipulate bloodlines for selective breeding of the human species. On a personal level, they are uniquely trained in almost superhuman abilities including access to a racial memory and some degree of prescience. Until Paul’s jihad, they and the Guild steered human destiny. The Empire is a vile society replete with injustice of class and sex, and it only gets worse through the sequels as Paul and Chani’s heirs establish an unbreakable prescient autocracy, but that hardly makes the book an endorsement of that society.

          • Antinous / Moderator says:

            Paul and Chani’s heirs establish an unbreakable prescient autocracy, but that hardly makes the book an endorsement of that society.

            And if we lived in a world where that was a real problem, that might be relevant. But we don’t. And it isn’t. Whereas women are treated as broodmares throughout much of our planet.

            And her name is noen, not neon.

          • Gulliver says:

            And if we lived in a world where that was a real problem, that might be relevant. But we don’t. And it isn’t.

            I think the message that knowing something is likely to happen doesn’t automatically confer the ability to avert it, and in some cases may reinforce it, is always relevant.

            Whereas women are treated as broodmares throughout much of our planet.

            Yes, and the Empire in Dune is a pessimistic portrayal of that and other inequalities taken to extremes. But the Bene Gesserit, a pyramidal hierarchy that uses women to manipulate a patriarchal society, is still much more than a collective of broodmares.

  20. Daemon says:

    I can’t say I actually found the movie confusing. I did find the first half boring though, so I’ve generally only watched the second half after that first time.

    Still speechless version is pretty cool.

  21. mick travis says:

    I got a soft spot for Dune the movie because I saw it when I was seven and I loved it – so every time I re-watch it my seven year old ‘this is the most awesome, weird, grandiose thing I’ve ever seen’ wonderment kicks in and makes the movie better than it probably, most certainly is.

  22. Anonymous says:

    Dear Internet,

    Can you please make it seem like the guild navigator is listening to Trololo guy?

    Thanks.

  23. Palomino says:

    Almost all american cinema is based on conflict, Dune embodies that to the extreme but then goes to far in explaining why there is a conflict and the history behind each thread.

    Although dialogue wasn’t removed from it, the directors cut version of Blade Runner truly was a simple “cut” (except for the ending). The removal of the original’s narration (or off screen internal dialogue/monologue) of Deckert, created a brand new movie.

    Watch a foreign film w/o the subtitles. If you get wrapped up in it or have a semblance (although the rise and fall in voice may assist you) of what’s going on, then the movie is communicating with you well.

    Sylvain Chomet’s works and watch a few silent movies. Sometimes it works and other times it doesn’t. Stage acting required grand physical motion because, contrary to what you might believe, playhoses were notoriously noisy thus the actors could rarely rely on their voice; it was their physical acting that brought them cheers and fame.

    Fianlly…Facial Acting is a dying art. Check out Maureen Stapleton’s famous facial acting skills; out of this world.

  24. Anonymous says:

    How about a version of all of the Transformers movies, with Shia LaBeouf edited out?

    Or, better still, all of Shia LaBeouf’s movies, with Shia LaBeouf edited out.

    Maybe a version of Phantom Menance with both Jar-Jar and Anakin removed?

    This is almost as good a Garfield minus Garfield.

  25. gwailo_joe says:

    I know exactly 3 things about Dune: ‘The Spice Must Flow’, Sting is in it. . .and ginourmous freaking sand worms.

    That’s it. Never saw the movie, though I think I skimmed the book in jr. high…maybe I should give it another shot.

    Anyway, I like this experiment. The film does have a nice look to it…(except the vacuum cleaner, that’s just silly :)

  26. IWood says:

    I have been working on Lego Dune for fifteen years.

    It’s cost me family. My friends. My dog, and one leg.

    But it will happen.

    Sean Young is attached, which was a bit of a coup.

  27. W. James Au says:

    There was a lot of great stuff to the Lynch version (production design and photography mainly), but I think he made it too Lynchian. Like this whole scene with the Guild Master, that character doesn’t even show up until the 2nd book (I think), but Lynch loved its spoogey weirdness so much he crammed it into the fucking beginning of the movie. Or Baron Harkonnen, who was a very sly, almost charming villain in the book, here basically became fat Frank Booth with boils.

  28. Anonymous says:

    I dunno, if you’re going to be messing with Dune’s audio, I think this version improves on it quite a bit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2B6jgkcANRE

  29. Horn55 says:

    Outstanding. I don’t know if I could stand 90 minutes of it but this clip was intense and beautiful. Subtraction can make beauty especially when dealing with something familiar.

  30. Anonymous says:

    I may be a rarity, but I liked that old Dune movie, though I reserve the right to come back someday and proclaim “The book was better,” if I ever get off my duff and read it, like all my internet friends have.

    Sometimes I like being confused by a movie or TV series, since sometimes that leads to rewatch value: Each time I might pick up a piece of the puzzle I missed earlier.

    That said, I’d absolutely love to watch a silent cut of the movie. A good story can sometimes be more effectively told without dialogue. For some intentionally silent films, it only increases the rewatch value, since you’re likely to be confused, and possibly lead to multiple valid theories about what happened and why.

  31. Anonymous says:

    This may be one the most brilliant ideas I’ve ever heard.

  32. Noah Nickels says:

    that was rather brilliant. I liked it very much, i have never seen the movie, so i have nothing to judge against, but that felt very Lynchian. The only thing that spoiled it for me was the microphone on the transport, clearly he was talking, but without that i think this would have been a rather awesome piece of film-making.

  33. Anonymous says:

    A remix within a remix within a remix (whatever that means, whatever that means, whatever that means).

    Doon. Read it. Laugh.

    sincerely,
    The Kumquat Haagen-Dasz

  34. i_prefer_yeti says:

    I kinda dug that German one the SciFi channel showed some years back.

    Wasn’t great, but wasn’t horrible either. Kinda like jell-o with grapes in it.

  35. Anonymous says:

    “unburdened by the need to make a story out of 650 pages of verbose political maneuvering by people who spend half the book analyzing their own superhuman, chess-like conversations.”

    What’s the point then? That’s the book! Meh. We need a surreal/magical-realism/anime reinterpretation of Dune. Conventional film techniques will fail or poorly convey what’s actually going on, since the story is so internal. I want to see Aronofsky’s Dune.

  36. Anonymous says:

    Needs more sound fx from Road Runner/Wile E. Coyote cartoons.

  37. Eye Open Doors says:

    Without the words that scene feels darker to me. It made me think of The Tell-Tale Heart (maybe Joseph Marzano 1958), a silent version I rented from the library years ago. It was black and white and shot with all natural light giving weight to the atmosphere of the film.

  38. lecti says:

    As someone who loves B-rated movies, Dune (the book) and David Lynch films, I love Dune (the movie), goofy weirdness and all.

    Maybe I have poor taste?

  39. Mujokan says:

    I would bet several dollars that Rob had recently indulged in cannabis sativa at the time he came up with this idea.

  40. MacBookHeir says:

    I’ve never seen “Dune” and now after having read one third of these comments I doubt if I ever will. A little bit of opinion and critique is nice and helpful – anything beyond that is a pain in the proverbial butt.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      The book is about people sitting around in the sand and thinking a lot. A discussion of the film won’t tell you much about the book.

  41. robulus says:

    “Don’t try your powers on me, witch! Try looking into that place where you dare not look. You’ll find me there, staring back at you!”

    I love that line, it must go back in. Also:

    “He IS the Kwisatz Haderach!!”

  42. Anonymous says:

    Obviously the most important scene in the novel is when the imperial ecologist Pardot Kynes is dying. Why is this not in the movie!?! This is the heart of the entire story (other books too). Would make better exposition than the 1984 movie’s intro. I still tear up when I read this chapter. It’s up there with Hamlet in terms of literature (at least for this science geek).

  43. Anonymous says:

    The movie was visually stunning, but I never felt that it was a good interpretation of the original story; its never easy to turn 4 pages of internal dialog into a picture.

    From the comments that were published in “Eye”, it seemed to me that Frank Herbert was less disappointed with the movie than we might think.

    Noen’s comments imply that he/she hasn’t read the books.

    • Gulliver says:

      @ Anon #131

      Noen’s comments imply that he/she hasn’t read the books.

      I must disagree. (Yeah, I know, I’d probably argue with a tree.) Noen at least read the first sequel with a good enough memory to recall the 60 gigadeaths perpetrated by Paul’s inadvertent Fremen jihad. And she said she read it over thirty years ago. That’s pretty rock-solid memory even by my pernickety standards.

      In addition to her dislike of unrealistic fiction, noen’s comments lead me to believe that she attributes to authors the moralities played out by their characters and their societies. I concede, if I did that I would be unable to enjoy most fiction, even Ender’s Game in which humankind’s governments instigated hostilities against the Buggers and then, instead of failing to try to communicate, proceed to dup a cadre of children into committing xenocide, then tell the instrument of their murder what he did and exile him for it. That’s pretty effed up. But that was the point. Joseph Smith knows I don’t see eye to eye with Card on many issues, but he was not presenting the Bugger War and Battle School as laudable achievements, a fact driven home by the three sequels and Ender’s Shadow. He was showing what warmongers could do to a civilization if left unencumbered.

  44. popvoid says:

    Well, maybe it’s because I’ve been hanging out at the San Francisco Silent Film Festival all day, but this seems to me like it would work better with a piano and intertitles.

  45. bardfinn says:

    In short – I read a tragedy about a man who could have had everything he really wanted, and changed the world to have it, but chose petty revenge and the dooming of all mankind instead – with a message that if you give men the power to lead society, even if he’s the kwisatz haderach, the perfect man, this shit’s going to still happen.

    People read it and come away with an impression that it’s a story of a young man’s ascent to power. I see a story of a young man’s abdication of power, for himself and his family and everyone.

  46. planettom says:

    What says it all is this glossary card that they handed out for moviegoers to peruse in their seats before the movie started.

    http://blastr.com/2011/02/found-dunes-studio-create.php

    It’s hard to convey the dawning realization of several hundred people that they’re seeing UH-OH OF DUNE.

  47. bardfinn says:

    You’re not impressed by Data. That’s fine.

    Please understand that first, I’m human. Understand secondly that I have Asperger’s syndrome — most of my childhood was intensely alienating, societally and culturally, even in my family, as I existed as a primarily rational being of a society of beings primarily emotional in motivation – persecuted, reviled for my intellectual “gifts” by my peers but congratulated by emotionally distant or emotionally arbitrary adults. I grew up seeing people pay lip service to intelligence, while I was reading multiple languages at “college” level, tutoring students — and seeing society celebrate physical beauty and performance, with cultural adoration and money and resources and opportunities.

    You may not identify with Data. That’s fine.

    Understand, please, that I am human, and I not only identified with Data but still do identify with the character. I see a rational being, labelled as inhuman by societal expectations, struggling to “become human” – not that he isn’t already a sentient being worthy of respect and rights, but that he can be satisfied that anyone would judge him as their equal, instead of an inferior.

    Simply that one does not identify with a character does not make the character flat, or meaningless, or dead or inhuman. It might simply be that humans are different, and it wasn’t a character tailored for your desired purposes.

  48. Dv Revolutionary says:

    Dune was an awesome movie. Not the fastest paced movie in the world but I am so glad I watched it and enjoyed it’s high weirdness before the internet took off and I got to see the injustice the critics had almost uniformly done to this movie.

    Dune is so underrated. It is a big budget sci-fi David Lynch Movie with a cinematic rock/coral messianic soundtrack.

    Look people you need to face the facts. You are not getting another big budget David Lynch movie much less a sci-fi one in this life.

    Oh, for the hardcore originalists: the three-hour version sucked rocks. I mean it opened with a shot of a book and five minutes of reciting the thousand years of fictional history and got slower from there. All for more explanation and a few extra shots?

  49. skeletoncityrepeater says:

    Remember that Lynch’s original intent is nothing like what we see in any cut of this movie. The studio gutted the project and it was finished up to look more like Edgar Rice Burroughs than Frank Herbert. I think the casting is decent, even the maniacal Sting, and forward age differences, like for Paul, are certainly nothing new in movies. I’ve read the book many times and some sequels as well. The imagery still totally matches with most of the visuals in the book. I think if this had been done the way Lynch wanted it, all that whispering and rapid fire quoting from the book would have been properly timed so it didn’t sound like a comic-book comedy. Also, maybe Toto was not the best choice to score a science-fiction epic.. (not the worst either?) How about Eno and Jerry Goldsmith!

    • Gulliver says:

      Cool artwork, but I agree it’s no way to start a movie:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_0uz7e9A6E&feature=related

      Can’t say I care for most of the casting calls. The Harkonnens came off like an SNL skit.

      • skeletoncityrepeater says:

        I dunno – I think the bad part about the Harkonnen characters is not the way they look, but the fact that there is just no space between their lines, ever.. The Baron does indeed have a fat, levitated body riddled with disease as a result of years of evil habits.. the sons are disgusting twits with one of them more fit than the others.. I think the constant yammering is what makes it feel like a comedy sketch.. maybe if it had focused on them actually doing more evil stuff instead of screaming about how much they hate the Atreides

  50. Anonymous says:

    There is a Walter Murch version of THX1138 on the Director’s Cut DVD. It’s called “Theatre of Noise Experience: Isolated Music and Sound Effects Track with Master Sessions”. Only the dialog track has been removed, but it really showcases some great sound design work.

  51. nickelrocket says:

    I don’t know. I’m not sure this is the best scene to take out ALL of the dialog. The point here is to know the Guild wants Paul killed. Without this knowledge, there is no driving force to hunt down Paul and House Atreides thereby forcing him out to meet the Fremen. Otherwise it would look like a pointless assassination attempt without any real Palace Intrigue that the story is really about. Who was behind the floating needle? Yes the dialog is clunky and yes the inner monologues are interminable but there is still a reason for these two groups to meet. A common goal that is mutually beneficial to both parties to keep the Spice flowing. Otherwise you have a giant head floating in a glass bus staring at the Emperor for 3 minutes. That was boring. Hearing the Navigator intone “The Spice must Flow” still gives me chills.

  52. Anonymous says:

    All David Lynch movies are better without the dialog. They’re basically silent films anyway. And the creepy synth music is perfect.

  53. jmdaly says:

    I think it’s beautiful, other than that I’m also excited about the way that not only does this change the spacial and temporal experience of the film, but also has cultural implications. I think more re-edits of corporate works should be done, to current reinvest personal understanding of our world into these works.

    I did something slightly similar, where I put foley back into a music video directed by andreas nilsson for Röyksopp. The idea was to remove the cultural connection of the beautiful video piece from one of “salesmanship” to “artistry” its interesting how the sonic cues can change our cultural understand.

    here’s the link, I definitely want to do more projects along this line in the future. http://vimeo.com/7933759 Andreas ended up seeing it, and putting it in a day at a film festival he was curating. pretty cool.

    PS. the technique in the dune video is pretty flawless, impressed.

  54. deredder says:

    I just wish Jodorowsky’s production of Dune, working with Giger and Dali could have got the green light (in development prior to Lynch getting the gig). Surprised it hasn’t been mentioned already. Do some research if you haven’t heard about it.

    • Gulliver says:

      I had mixed feelings when the Jodorowsky project fell through. While it probably would have been a spectacle to see, it would have essentially been Jodorowsky’s story, not Herbert’s. Even though I keep my ears pricked for any science fiction books making it to the silver screen, often I’m easily consoled when they don’t by the simple fact that most good SF books would make poor movies. Probably also skewed by the fact that whereas I’d die without books, I’m only mildly enamored with movies.

  55. akbar56 says:

    Brilliant concept Rob. As an editor myself I am curious. Is this just a straight hard cut removal of the dialog bits, or did you work a little audio magic here and there to make it all flow?

  56. Zadaz says:

    A book-faithful Dune will always be a disappointment. Yes, I love the book, I’ve read it over a dozen times, but a good film it does not make. 99% of the book takes place as exposition or internal monologue. And in that the David Lynch movie got it right. It externalized and visualized a number of things that would have required even more whispering, VO, and asides to the audience.

    But quit trying to make movies or TV shows out of it. It’s not a subject that can manage the transition successfully.

  57. Anonymous says:

    I like the original movie. I don’t know why people dislike it so much. Think it just has that rep now.

  58. Anonymous says:

    The only good things about the original Dune was the sandworms, the set design, and Sting’s jock strap. Some of the best sets of any movie.

  59. ab5tract says:

    I’m surprised no one has mentioned the incredible work that has been done in fanediting this epic film.

    I don’t know what everyone is complaining about in regards to the pacing and dialog of the film, but that is perhaps because I have never watched the original version (though I own it, as per the moral code of fanedits).

    From the tone, it does not sound like many who have commented would even be interested in watching a longer, more complete and (most importantly) more accurate to the Lynch screenplay version, check out Dune: The Third Stage edit ( http://fanedit.org/957/ ). For more information on the wonderful world of fanedits, check http://fanedit.org.

  60. cinemascope53 says:

    I would probably just leave a 45min Dune Without Words on a constant loop. Lynch’s sound design is right behind Murch’s.
    And forget YouTube, this is more of a Phantom Edit situation (except you’re jettisoning exposition, not Jar Jar). You cut the whole movie and you’ll get a Demonoid invite and I’ll seed until the end of time.

  61. AllyPally says:

    “The persistent belief is that something can be made better by adding more”

    No, no, no.

    Speaking as a video editor the rule is, “When in doubt, cut it out.”

    If the audience can’t make sense of the story, the answer isn’t to make it longer. The answer is to do it differently.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      Bless you. I’ve seen too many 90 minute movies squeezed into 150 minutes in the last few years. The fact that King Kong (1933) has a higher user rating on IMDb than King Kong (2005) ought to be a hint to filmmakers.

  62. OoerictoO says:

    been done. and it’s good:

    http://fanedit.org/598/

  63. Anonymous says:

    “All the extant versions fade (at least in our imagination) before his legendary rough cut, reputed to be 4 hours long.”

    Is there no leak of that? Why the frack doesn’t the mighty Rights Holders just give Lynch completely free hands to redo whatever he wants with it (if he still would want to)? The revenue stream from the official version can’t be very intense nowadays so what do they have to lose? Heck, why not release the whole thing (including all unused cuts) under CC and start a cash prize competion for the best remake?

    • ab5tract says:

      There is a storied history of this footage.

      Some of it was reincorporated into Alan Smithee’s cut of the film, which David Lynch required his name to be removed from.

      A lot of the footage is available but is of substantially lower quality.

      What you should do is check out the fanedits of the film. Nearly every faneditor who has attempted a new version is doing so in order to more closely resemble the structure that Lynch had in mind.

  64. shadowfirebird says:

    I love the movie.

    But, watching this makes me realise how hateful it was that they felt they had to squeeze exposition into every single scene of the movie. Not that it wasn’t done masterfully, but how much better a movie it would have been with a lot less dialogue!

    If they had, for example, assumed that they were playing to an audience of people with average intelligence…

  65. Charlie Stross says:

    Damn, if I wasn’t real busy right now I would be so tempted to Downfall-sub that sequence …

    ALIEN AMBASSADOR: All your base are belong to us!

    GALACTIC EMPEROR: Launch all zigs!!

  66. ADavies says:

    Dune without dialog works surprisingly well! Makes me want to see the movies again. On second thought, I’d probably only be disappointed with all the talking. Maybe we should bring back silent films.

  67. LintMan says:

    >What I find everywhere on the net is a new tribalism.
    >I am acting against that. I am not of your tribe and
    >I will make it clear to you how profoundly I am not you.

    There’s a term on the internet for this. It’s called trolling.

    Well done, Troll. You’ve clearly demonstrated how unique, special and superior you are with your comments trashing the genres we love and bow to your refined taste. We applaud your efforts to enrich us with your mere presence. Thank you!

  68. Anonymous says:

    It’s an interesting experiment, and it does make you appreciate the visuals more.

    I can’t say this “fixes” anything, though. “Promising?” Well, as an intriguing art piece you’d play in the background at a party, but as a piece of storytelling, IMHO this really just makes a movie that’s already confusing even more so.

  69. kylerconway says:

    “This video contains content from Movieclips and NBC Universal, one or more of whom have blocked it in your country on copyright grounds.”

    Boo!

  70. Anonymous says:

    someone once told me that if you want to see if a film works (as a story telling device, and this applies to anything as small as a tv ad), turn the sound off. well, if you look at that opening pan (at 32 secs.), it is so poor I can’t stand it – and it set the tone for this whole film. observe the walk across by the guy with the beard, and how so obviously tries to land exactly where he does, and how the guy with the dogs falls right in behind him, then the bad cut to the young woman, also in a 1940′s-like shot – it’s CONTRIVED. Lynch is an artist, but tackling this under a studio system was stupid. no one is without fault here. this project was too big for Lynch, who is better with more intimate concepts. Eno rules.

  71. Piperbum says:

    @ OoerictoO #106 – I second that edit. ‘Spicediver has done a very good job. http://fanedit.org/598/

  72. ill lich says:

    The movie was flawed, but not unwatchable, as many have said (most of them professional film critics), the problem is more that we are dropped into the entire Dune universe with no warning; if you haven’t read the book it will seem completely confusing. I have often wondered if enough cut footage exists to make it more understandable (Lynch doesn’t think so I guess), studios almost always ruin the most arty movies by trying to squeeze them into 2 hour run times. I think there may be other ways to edit the film to make it more enjoyable.

    I found this edit very enthralling, the sets and costumes are great, and the acting not as wooden as many believe.

    • Gulliver says:

      The movie was flawed, but not unwatchable, as many have said (most of them professional film critics), the problem is more that we are dropped into the entire Dune universe with no warning; if you haven’t read the book it will seem completely confusing.

      I thought this reviewer was on point:

      http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F06E2D71238F937A25751C1A962948260

      Particularly the first sentence:

      SEVERAL of the characters in ”Dune” are psychic, which puts them in the unique position of being able to understand what goes on in the movie.

  73. Anonymous says:

    I really wasn’t interested in commenting on the flamebait you posted earlier (I mean seriously, you don’t do yoga on the Dali Lama’s mat, and you don’t go into an article dedicated to a Sci-Fi geek type topic, piss all over the original work, and then expect a welcome reception), but now I think you’re asking for a response to your ignorant assertions.

    >Orson Scott Card — “Enders Game” is a sympathetic retelling of the life of Adolph Hitler and Card didn’t even write it.

    Really, did you read the book? Where is the Hitler character? If there was one, it was in the elder brother who was not painted sympathetically at all. This sort of BS comes from people reading their own hangups into someone else’s work.

    >Robert Heinlein — Puts the nut into wing-nut.

    The guy wrote 32 novels, and apparently everyone of them was based solely from the same political viewpoint. What a crock. Stranger in a Strange Land is almost as close to a hippy type approach as you can get, and while Starship Troopers was pro-military, that doesn’t make it anything like a wing-nut paradise. And the movie adaptation was far from the book but was brilliant parody of military jingoism. Again, I think you’re the one reading things into the work that are not there.

    And you’re seriously going to lump everyone else, from Jules Verne and H.G. Wells to Isaac Asimov, Fredrick Pohl and John Scalzi (which would be the hundreds of “other sci-fi” authors) into the same category as the few authors you cherry picked from the genre? You have to be kidding if you want people to actually take this viewpoint seriously.

    >If there must be an imaginary landscape then I want it realistic. Not peopled with children acting out an insane or narcissistic narrative.

    Yeah, because things like nuclear subs, rockets to the moon, communicators and wireless tablets, space travel in general, genetic engineered creatures and artificial intelligence are completely unrealistic. Oh wait, that’s basically a straight line from Jules Verne to John Scalzi via, Isaac Asimov, Fredrick Pohl, and most of the other sci-fi writers from the 20th century. It’s only “imaginary” until someone makes it work.

  74. Jake0748 says:

    Bring it on! One of my favorite books of all time. Such high hopes for the movie, dashed by the inane dialog (and interior monolog). Going to watch the linked clip now.

  75. Anonymous says:

    uhhhh, no, this still doesn’t work any better

  76. Jake0748 says:

    Insanely awesome. More? Can someone redo the whole movie with a whole new dialog? I always love the visuals of this movie.

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