Occupy Wall Street takes over Times Square (updated)

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56 Responses to “Occupy Wall Street takes over Times Square (updated)”

  1. tehsusenoh says:

    Cam 1 has the best view overall, they’ve moved it to point directly at the crowd.  Love the marching band.

  2. awjt says:

    Hoping that good comes of this.

  3. Cowicide says:

    Meanwhile, Hannity keeps referring to everyone out there as a MOB.

    Doing a great job!  Because the day that Hannity admires you like he does the tea baggers… is the day you’ve truly failed America.

    I’m prouder and prouder to be an American as this continues to gather steam. And, it seems to make evil, dumb people more and more worried. Fantastic.

  4. jhires says:

    I’ve been playing monopoly a bit over the last few days. I came to the conclusion that all these years, I was thinking about the goal of the game all wrong. I thought the goal was to accumulate as much property as possible as a means to become rich. That’s not it at all. The goal is to accumulate wealth and property as a means of destroying everyone else financially. Regardless of how much you accumulate during the game, it does not end until everyone else is destroyed. But I find it just a bit ironic that it is game-over for everyone including the “winner” once that happens. Both the 99% and 1% sides of the occupy movement would do well to pay attention. Game over is not a livable solution for anyone.

    • a says:

      You do realize that “Monopoly” is a board game and not an accurate representation of human society, right?

      For starters humans generate wealth, it’s not a zero-sum game.

  5. For anyone interested in showing support for Occupy Wall Street in their website, I’ve made a simple little ribbon that’s easy to add: http://jeffcouturier.com/2011/10/i-support-the-occupy-movement-banner-project/

  6. Mister44 says:

    Good news, everyone. There is an anthem now:

    http://www.kmfdm.net/adrugagainstwallstreet/

    • Is there an orchestral or electronic version, I’m not into the whole rock/metal thing.

      • Mister44 says:

        Mmm – not that I know of. KMFDM is industrial – or more specific – Ultra Heavy Beat. This one is based on an older song that is more guitar heavy, but a lot of their stuff is more electronic, or a 50/50 mix.

  7. Pag says:

    One thing I realized recently is that, proportionally, the difference between a hobo living on $1000 a year and a doctor making $100,000 is the same as the difference between that doctor and a CEO making $10,000,000 a year.

    Kinda blew my mind, really. No wonder the very rich seem to operate on a different level from everybody else — just like an engineer making $100k operates on a separate level from hobos…

    • jimh says:

      It’s interesting to not that although the scale varies so widely, each of these people believe that it could disappear. That someone could, and is probably trying to take it away. Even though the CEO has MUCH farther to fall, they don’t recognize it. There will never be “enough”.

    • Andrew Eisenberg says:

      Mathematically, you are right.  However, there is a big difference between people who are earning enough to feed, cloth, and house themselves vs people (like a hobo) who can’t.  After making the enough for the essentials, everything else is just extra and doesn’t have a significant effect on a person’s happiness.

      The doctor may be 100 times happier than the hobo, but the CEO is not 100 times happier than the doctor.

      • retchdog says:

        I think he was talking about economic mobility and stability. Happiness is a fairly short-sighted thing, and I mean that in both respects: people can be “happy” and not see the iceberg coming, and happiness is an incomplete economic indicator. The doctor is happy /for now/. The CEO’s family is set for at least a few generations and would almost certainly survive the total implosion of the US.

        • That_Anonymous_Coward says:

          “The CEO’s family is set for at least a few generations and would almost certainly survive the total implosion of the US.”

          Until we remember that the poor are tough and stringy and the rich are soft and tender.

          • retchdog says:

            well, they would survive it by leaving… they don’t need to worry about language, culture, &c., because they’re rich and can hire translators, servants, and tutors and maybe even a few public officials. even a doctor’s nest egg would be quickly zeroed out this way.

  8. ozmonatov says:

    I can’t help but think of the scene in Arrested Development where Lindsay Bluth protests against the army, and the handful of protesters gets led into a tiny cage out in nowhere where they are free to protest. “The army welcomes your dissent” the army guy says.

    I do bet the standing sentiment around the world is “Just let them go on for a bit until they get tired”, which i for love of the future really hope we will not get.

  9. mrbunnyfeet says:

    I’m sorry, but the NYPD is no different than the Syrian government shooting their own protesting citizens.

  10. jtegnell says:

    Looking at those live cameras, it seems like business as usual. Is there really something going on there?

  11. derezzed says:

    the video features an ad saying “Great times are waiting” I couldn’t agree more.

  12. Timothy Krause says:

    I left when the kettling started. Saw a motorcycle cop smash his front wheel through a barrier, unaware it was there. The barricades were being broken down on the east side of Broadway (forgot what cross street, high forties, I think), people being pulled away and arrested.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33498942@N04/6247612219/in/set-72157627777474215/

  13. rhinoman says:

    If they want a solution, why the hell aren’t they protesting in front of Congress and the White House? What does picking a fight with the NYPD get them?  Not to mention screwing up things for the actual working people in NYC. You think the Wall Street people care about this?  The rich people you pretend to be bothering aren’t bothered one bit. Their black cars just take them up 3rd Avenue and across Central Park. I know, it’s like so totally cool to march and think you’re changing the world. Unfortunately, you’re mostly just  making life difficult for the cops and cab drivers and people who work in that area. Who aren’t rich. 

    Congress and the President(s) have failed you guys, and they’re the only ones who can fix it.  You may not like it, but it’s still true. You want to change the status quo? You would do a lot better convincing large groups of people that you have a legitimate grudge. This isn’t doing it.

    • Guest says:

      They chose NYC because it is the epicenter of the problem. They chose NYC because all roads lead there and it never closes. They chose NYC because DC today is just a symptom of the problem.

    • Rindan says:

      Why are the protesting in NYC?  I imagine a non-trivial reason is that most of the people protesting, you know, live there.  The fact that it happens to be at the symbolic (and some times physical) heart of some pretty grievous economic wrongs is icing.  

      Going out and being annoying is a pretty time honored traditional way of spurring politicians into action.  Protesting in DC isn’t going to accomplish much.  Why do you think the congressperson from Alabama is going to give two shits if he sees some random protesters marching around the capital?  He sees it every day and deals with it roughly the way I deal with the mob of Save the Children solicitors on the sidewalk, which is to say my brain files them off in the place reserved for fire hydrants, “things to not run but otherwise spare no sliver of thought for”.

      So if the point isn’t to get politicians to be personally annoyed with you.  The point is to somehow send a message that gets the people who vote for politicians annoyed.  If that is the case, don’t waste your time in DC.  Find something nice and symbolic to march around in circles.  In this case, it is Wall St.  Marching around the most obvious symptom of a problem is a much better symbolic act than marching in circles around politicians.

      The Occupy movement has a lot of problems.  I personally am deeply skeptical that they have the capacity to turn anger and attention into action.  I think that they have shown no capacity to take their momentum and and their attention and turn it into useful work.  That said, picking NYC (and other financial centers) as the place to draw attention is exactly the right move.  

      They could march in circles around DC until they are blue in the face, and it won’t change the fact that congress, especially with a split senate, a super majority republican house, and a democrat president are not going to do anything.  

      • Antinous / Moderator says:

        It’s not like the President comes out on the White House balcony or the Senate gathers on the steps of the Capitol to watch a demonstration. In the unlikely event that they watch it at all, they watch it on television. The media are the ineluctable conduits of protest, so you march where you can draw their interest.

      • Cowicide says:

        Why are the protesting in NYC?

        It’s seems to be getting some minute amount of attention there.  They wanted to do it in Bumpus Mills, Tennessee but they couldn’t get the permits there.

        The Occupy movement has a lot of problems.

        Speak for yourself.

        I personally am deeply skeptical that they have the capacity to turn anger and attention into action.

        You were also “deeply skeptical” this would ever get any traction at all from the very beginning.   You have been utterly and completely proven wrong and become more and more wrong as this continues to expand despite your naysaying.

        You’ve lost all credibility.

        And, once again… what do you hope to achieve with your negative rhetoric here?  I mean, you almost seem obsessed with naysaying this movement and it’s only getting more incessant.  Why?

        • Rindan says:

          You were also “deeply skeptical” this would ever get any traction at all from the very beginning.   You have been utterly and completely proven wrong and become more and more wrong as this continues to expand despite your naysaying.

          I can’t seem to figure out how to do a search on posts on BoingBoing now that they have changed the discussion system, but I am pretty sure I never said anything to imply the current state is never going to happen.  In fact, I have been pretty much positive on the idea that there is a large wave of anger towards the economy that could roll into a real populist movement.  I have been and remain skeptical that the forward momentum they have can be translated into action.  To me, the plan looks a bit too much like.

          1) Protest anger against economic pain
          2) Build protest movement
          3) ????
          4) End to corporate rule!

          And, once again… what do you hope to achieve with your negative rhetoric here?  I mean, you almost seem obsessed with naysaying this movement and it’s only getting more incessant.  Why?

          And this gets to the heart of it.  I don’t have a believer gene in my body.  I am a skeptic and am more interested in figuring out what is wrong rather than imaging utopian dreams of how it could all work out perfect in the end.

          Skepticism is a good thing.  History is littered with the corpses of people who thought that blind belief was enough to overcome all obstacles and that if they were just righteous enough they would have victory.  I look at step 3 on the path to victory and think that just hoping it will sort itself out about is a bit daft.  Granted, I know that looking on things I more or less agree with with even a whiff of skepticism as to their ability to succeed revokes my TRUE BELIEVER status, but I can deal.  I’m not a true believer.  I’m a skeptic, and I hope that my skepticism spurs someone to think for a few seconds as to how to achieve the goal, rather than blindly fumble on hoping that victory lands in their lap.

          Maybe you should look at yourself Cowicide.  You some how managed to take a few paragraphs that I posted that all support exactly what Occupy is doing and how they are doing it, ignore them, and fixate with zealous rage on the two sentences that express mild skepticism.  I am going to go out on a limb here and guess that you were not raised in a highly religious house, or that if you were, you had poor relations with them.  I think there is a pretty non-zero chance that if you had, you would be beating me with a Bible right now screaming “Nonbeliever!” at the first sign that I am a godless heathen.  

    • Andrew Eisenberg says:

      At this point, they don’t want a solution.  Most people don’t even know what they are marching for.  People know what they are marching against, but things haven’t coalesced into a coherent set of demands.

      The best thing that can come out of these protests is an ongoing dialog about the problems in our society.  Once that happens, we can start to think about solutions.  

      These protests are the start of a very long, and profound change.

    • eeyore says:

      “If they want a solution, why the hell aren’t they protesting in front of Congress and the White House? What does picking a fight with the NYPD get them?  Not to mention screwing up things for the actual working people in NYC. You think the Wall Street people care about this?  The rich people you pretend to be bothering aren’t bothered one bit.”

      Frankly, because if they protested in DC, they’d get less coverage, and your complaint would read like this….

      “If they want a solution, why the hell are they protesting in front of Congress and the White House? What does picking a fight with the DCPD get them?  Not to mention screwing up things for the actual working people in DC. You think the politcos care about this?  The rich people you pretend to be bothering aren’t bothered one bit.”

      … at least in NY, they get some press coverage too.

    • atimoshenko says:

      Congress and the President(s) have failed you guys, and they’re the only ones who can fix it.  You may not like it, but it’s still true.

      The problem runs deeper. The very design of the current system is broken in addition to the way the system functions. We can no longer afford to take aspirin and hope that it will cure our brain tumour as well as our headache.

    • volk says:

      We ARE protesting in DC.

      and LA.

      and Boston, and Philadelphia, Denver, Austin, El Paso, Sacramento, Portland, Seattle, Albuquerque, Nashville, Atlanta, Miami, Montreal, Mexico City, Caracas, Managua, Bogota, Lima, Buenos Aires, Sao Paolo, Honolulu, Manila, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Cairo, Moscow, Athens, Rome, London, Madrid, Dublin, Berlin, Leipzig, Cologne, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Mogadishu, Brussels, Reykjavik, Cardiff, Stockholm, Ontario, Adelaide, Sydney, Perth, and hundreds of other places around the world.  meetup.com/occupytogether

      As far as DC, I’m here, with 200-400 people every night, and on weekends around 1000-1500.  we march on the white house, the capitol, the washington monument, the world bank, the chamber of commerce, etc, etc, etc.  we are getting heard and noticed.  New York is a nexus because New York has the highest gini coefficient of any state in the country and because New York was the first protest in this round of feather-rufflings.  New York is fighting a New York fight, and this ethos has spread, so DC fights a DC fight, LA fights an LA fight, America fights an American fight, and the world fights a world fight.

      The core concept behind a 99% consensus is that, by definition, you will never get 1 opinion.  just about everybody agrees, however, that something way up there in terms of collective perspective orientation, is fundamentally wack.  almost none of these people (us) are economists, senators, or experts on social policy, but we know instinctively that the world is being run on unchecked capitalistic aggression, and that this has produced profound socialized, globalized losses, and gaudy privatized profits.the idea here is to engage in living occupation AS an eyesore and a conversation starter, while marching and making noise to attract the attention of our federal democratic republic, both its population and its institutions, to enact legal redress by those of us who have been elected to represent the concerns of their constituents, the people.  the American Civil Rights movement gained a majority of its momentum by marching en masse and taking control of the nation’s dinner tables and tv screens until it could not be ignored.

      this is the organizing principle of an occupation, to get in the way until you cannot be ignored, until the fish stop swimming around you asleep.  the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

    • skyhawk1 says:

      Don’t worry Congress phones lines and faxes are being hit. Besides everyday is OccupyDC. The protests varies.

  14. TimRowledge says:

    If they want a solution, why the hell aren’t they protesting in front of Congress and the White House?

    Perhaps because they live where it is practical to get to Wall St? Perhaps because it is a potent symbol of what is wrong? Perhaps because they see that the politicians are essentially irrelevant because they have become a wholly  owned subsidiary of the super rich? Time to review that whole Declaration of Independence thing.

  15. jtegnell says:

    Come on, Rhinoman, are you serious?

    It doesn’t occur to you that the vast majority of people protesting in NYC live in NYC?

  16. awjt says:

    I’m curious why the credit unions have remained silent. Isn’t a good credit union run by an elected slate? A credit union that hews to its constituents’ wishes could solve much of this woe. If people refused to participate in mass economics and instead kept their cash closer to home, we might see some real devaluation of the Evil Ones.

  17. Senor Schaffer says:

    Ha!  :15 seconds in.

    GREAT TIMES ARE WAITING

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7P0hrOU4Feo#t=15s

  18. shishudas says:

    I believe the way forward is 3-prong:

    1. Federal:  we need a Constitutional Convention to separate money from politics. See http://on.msnbc.com/qB9dZJ. Start organizing for this now.

    2. State:  pass Clean Election laws. Start with progressive states and build from there. New York already has one sponsored by 24 Assembly members, but stuck in committee (Bill A01267).

    3. Local:  New York City already has public campaign financing. Why can’t your town? Start convincing towns to pass local Clean Election laws. Start with progressive towns and build from there.

    Please spread these ideas around.  Thanks!

  19. JayByrd says:

    Cops are having their jobs cut, pensions looted like everyone else.
    The most abusive members of the NYPD that I’ve seen are the white shirts in management.

  20. kmoser says:

    I wonder if the tourists think this is an everyday occurrence.

  21. sideunes says:

    Anyone still questioning the motives of Occupy Wall Street…here is your answer in color, as plain as day. 

    http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2011/10/income-gain-distribution-1917-81-82-2000-2001-08/

  22. teapot says:

    Is anyone throwing water bombs at the police cordons from high balconies yet? This is NYC we’re talking about. I can’t imagine blocking protesters would be very fun when you’re saturated (in urine).

    ^Anyone in NYC: feel free to appropriate my suggestion.

  23. Iain Marcks says:

    the situation north of 42nd street was much more focused, possibly due to the presence of a marching band that was leading the revelers in song and dance.

    then there was the amazing moment (around 6:15PM EST) were 100′s of people lit sparklers & sang “This Little Light of Mine”. http://yfrog.com/hw3r7msj 

    then a declaration was made: “We are here to reignite the light of democracy. To celebrate the birth of a new world. A world by and for The 99 Percent.”

    at about 6:30PM EST the police asked us to leave and — using the peoples’ microphone — we asked the crowd to move east of Broadway, towards Rockefeller center. because the NYPD had the square’s pedestrian paths barricaded off into separate sections, I believe it was only our section who actually got the message and cleared the area without incident.

    (there was no need for tomatoes.)

  24. Mike Rose says:

    @Andrew Eisenberg: “The doctor may be 100 times happier than the hobo, but the CEO is not 100 times happier than the doctor”

    Following the US answer to the Arabs’ Spring, let’s hope then that after the American Fall some of these wretched CEO banksters start to enjoy life again  … as they become happy hobos

  25. n8zilla says:

    so glad to be in LA, where it seems we can protest without being hassled/assaulted by the cops. at least one large American city is taking the Bill of Rights as more than a mere list of suggestions.

    • Cowicide says:

      It seems some people in this country consider the Bill of Rights a nuisance to be avoided.  They spit on our American flag every time they ignore the Bill of Rights.  It’s the work of people who despise what America truly stands for or are just too ignorant to think for themselves and will blindly follow their masters down the road to hell.

      It’s time for the police to join the American public and show true courage in the face of injustice.  That would truly scare the living shit out of those in power.

      So how about it, good cops?  You wanna do something incredible in your lifetime?  

      Put aside your fear…. and join us.  A lot of you guys are adrenaline junkies anyway…. at least do it for the rush.  Don’t tell me you don’t get a tingle up your spine at just the thought of having this much audacity.  Many of you are already heros in the cities you live in for all your bravery in keeping citizens safe… now’s your chance to be an American hero.

      Once in a lifetime opportunity.  Be on the right side of history.  Cowards need not apply.

  26. Iain Marcks says:

    shit is about to go down at Washington Square Park. talk of an occupation was made, but the NYPD are closing in. looks like they may table the action for another day. park closes 12AM EST.

  27. mollyblue says:

    Thank you, Jeff! I’ve got one of your banners on my site now AND participated in the OWS protests last weekend. DON’T STOP!

  28. hapa says:

    mother jones’s josh harkinson stayed up late for this video of #ows washington square park voluntary arrests
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61AsYeJqfXg

  29. I was there and marched from Washington Square to Times Square. I really must say that the NYPD behavied professionally and courteously. There were a few tense moments where it seemed like they might react poorly, but they didn’t, even in the face of a few screamers who did their best to antagonize them.

    When I arrived with the crowd at 46th street, NYPD basically stopped us from entering the square, but it was the blue-jacketed community relations officers that courteously explained to us that there was no room, and it would be unsafe. So instead we went to 45th street and had no problem.

    Also, as we marched, I spoke with one officer briefly, when I said, you know we’re in this together, she said, oh I know it!

  30. D. Keith Higgs says:

    Wanting to participate in #Occupy protests. Instead I’m glad to have to occupy a cubicle. Wake up executives. Stockpiling cash in lieu of hiring people is extending the recession.

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