TED2012 Fellowship applications open

This is a great opportunity for creative people from around the world to present their work. I've met a few TED Fellows and they are some of the most interesting people I know.

TED Fellows is an international fellowship program designed to nurture great ideas and help them spread around the world. Each year, we select a group of 40 individuals who show world-changing potential, inviting them to participate in either the TED or TEDGlobal Conference. At the end of the year, we select 10 of these Fellows to participate in an extended two-year Senior Fellowship, bringing them to five consecutive conferences. The principal goal of the program is to empower the Fellows to effectively communicate their work to the world.

The TED Fellows program focuses on attracting applicants living or working in five parts of the globe: the Asia-Pacific region, Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East, with consideration given to applicants from the rest of the world. (Applicants must be proficient in English.) The program seeks remarkable thinkers and doers who have shown unusual accomplishment, exceptional courage, moral imagination, and the potential to effect positive change in their respective fields. The program focuses on innovators in technology, entertainment, design, science, film, art, music, entrepreneurship, and the NGO community, among other fields.

As part of the Fellowship, TEDGlobal 2012 Fellows receive conference admission, round-trip transportation, and full accommodation for TEDGlobal 2012, June 25– June 29. Fellows also participate in a three-day pre-conference where they present a short talk about their work, which will be considered for TED.com. Other benefits include elite skill-building courses taught by world experts, social opportunities, and surprise extras.

Apply to TED Fellows


  1. I’m a big fan of TED, but you gotta love how ethnically diverse the graphic appears to be until you realize that the center person is still a white male. Perhaps this reflects the disproportionate number of white, male presenters.

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